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was 549 transformer question


Tom Lee
 

The CTC-4 used a 6CB5. I can't recall ever having seen an 807 in a color set, so I was very intrigued by your post. Indeed, I only saw a few in very old B&W sets, lots of 6BG6s in later (but still early) B&W sets. I was always on the lookout for 807s, settled for 6BG6s.

Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 2/8/2021 19:41, Michael A. Terrell wrote:
Tom Lee wrote:
Hi Michael,

I think you meant to say that 807s were used in early B&W sets, not color ones. The 6BG6 was very popular in the early sets, and was basically an 807 in octal form.
I think that it was used in the RCA CTC4 chassis. I gave that set away in 1972, when I went into the Army so I could be wrong. Early TVs like the small electrostaticly deflected Pilot TVs didn't use a flyback, so it was a free running oscillator for the HV supply. It was basically a low grade X/Y scope with video applied to the Z axis. They used a three inch round CRT with a P4 phosphor.It was the mid '60s, the last time that I saw a Pilot TV.




Michael A. Terrell
 

Tom Lee wrote:
The CTC-4 used a 6CB5. I can't recall ever having seen an 807 in a color set, so I was very intrigued by your post. Indeed, I only saw a few in very old B&W sets, lots of 6BG6s in later (but still early) B&W sets. I was always on the lookout for 807s, settled for 6BG6s.

Tom
I only saw two CTC4 based chassis, and both were in the early '70s. The first was mine, which I gave to a collector when he bought all of my antique radios before I left for the Army. The second was a rare, video only version that RCA built for TV stations. It was still in use at one of the two TV stations in Fairbanks, Alaska. Most of the station was still early '50s RCA TV equipment. I was shocked that the AFRTS station at Ft. Greely was better equipped, even if my station was Monochrome.

BTW, I transmitted our station ID in color, with no color equipment. I borrowed a Heathkit color bar generator, and fed it into the Genlock input of our dual, Grass Valley Sync Generator. I hand made a 35m slide to position two lines over the color bars. I did it because an ID10T Second Lt. was telling everyone that the station could not be converted to color even though we were waiting for the delivery of new equipment. 15 seconds after I did it live, he was on the phone screaming, "Soldier! You just made a fool of me!" I laughed and said, "Sir, you brag that you are a self made man" and I hung up. He was the base PIO, and a real idiot.


Tom Lee
 

Hilarious! Nice improvisation with the Heathkit.

Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 2/9/2021 03:08, Michael A. Terrell wrote:
Tom Lee wrote:
The CTC-4 used a 6CB5. I can't recall ever having seen an 807 in a color set, so I was very intrigued by your post. Indeed, I only saw a few in very old B&W sets, lots of 6BG6s in later (but still early) B&W sets. I was always on the lookout for 807s, settled for 6BG6s.

Tom
I only saw two CTC4 based chassis, and both were in the early '70s. The first was mine, which I gave to a collector when he bought all of my antique radios before I left for the Army. The second was a rare, video only version that RCA built for TV stations. It was still in use at one of the two TV stations in Fairbanks, Alaska. Most of the station was still early '50s RCA TV equipment. I was shocked that the AFRTS station at Ft. Greely was better equipped, even if my station was Monochrome.

BTW, I transmitted our station ID in color, with no color equipment. I borrowed a Heathkit color bar generator, and fed it into the Genlock input of our dual, Grass Valley Sync Generator. I hand made a 35m slide to position two lines over the color bars. I did it because an ID10T Second Lt. was telling everyone that the station could not be converted to color even though we were waiting for the delivery of new equipment. 15 seconds after I did it live, he was on the phone screaming, "Soldier! You just made a fool of me!" I laughed and said, "Sir, you brag that you are a self made man" and I hung up. He was the base PIO, and a real idiot.




Michael A. Terrell
 

Tom Lee wrote:
Hilarious! Nice improvisation with the Heathkit.

Tom
My motto is, Never piss off the Engineer!. When I got to basic I was told I could be a cook or a truck driver. I told off an E8 and a Captain. I had five medical 4F ratings, but was drafted because I worked in Electronics. They told me I would be given the hardest electronics test in the Army and that I would fail because no one had ever passed. It was 110 questions, and you were given two hours, 15 minutes. The average score was 22/110, and passing was 42/110. They gave me a copy with only 88 questions and laughed. I finished it in 17 minutes, and my score was 82/88. The school was a mix of Electrical and Broadcast engineering that could be converted to the then FCC first phone. My sccore was higher than recent graduates of that school, but I was self taught. I pissed off a lot of people because of it.

I had built theĀ  Heathkit for one of the operators at the station. He was trying to learn TV repair, but was still learning to solder. That station was my first use and repair of Tektronix scopes. I had for RM529 Waveform monitors, and an old scope that I had to repair before I could repair anything else.

I not only worked at the TV station, I did CATV and RADARĀ  work at Ft. Rucker. They were short handed, so my section loaned me to RADAR for a week. The jerk I was to work with tried to talk down to me, "You might know a little Electronics, working on TVs." I smiled and informed him that RADAR was a stripped down TV, since it had no Chroma or Aural circuitry. When the week ended, the section chief was angry. "RADAR has put in a transfer request, because you did too good! The same happened when I showed the A/V section how to make a custom control panel for the General's conference room. Our section had been asked to design and install the sound system, and they were in my way. My section leader sighed, "You've done it again. A/V is trying to take you from us."

Maybe we should take this to E-mail?


Roy Thistle
 

On Tue, Feb 9, 2021 at 03:32 AM, Michael A. Terrell wrote:


I was self taught
We're all self taught ... eventually.
Some people learn about that sooner than later.


Michael A. Terrell
 

Tom Lee wrote:

Hilarious! Nice improvisation with the Heathkit.

Tom

My motto is, Never piss off the Engineer!. When I got to basic I was told I
could be a cook or a truck driver. I told off an E8 and a Captain. I had
five medical 4F ratings, but was drafted because I worked in Electronics.
They told me I would be given the hardest electronics test in the Army and
that I would fail because no one had ever passed. It was 110 questions, and
you were given two hours, 15 minutes. The average score was 22/110, and
passing was 42/110. They gave me a copy with only 88 questions and laughed.
I finished it in 17 minutes, and my score was 82/88. The school wa