Wanted: 5000 series extender(s)


Dave Peterson
 

If anyone has a line on a pair of 5000 series extenders, 067-0645-03, I'd appreciate the reference.

I do see a couple on eBay, but they are of course on the pricey side. For those prices I'm more inclined to research and build a DIY solution.

I've done a little research on here and I understand there have been some kits at times. That they also occasionally show up online for a reasonable price has led me to setup an automated notice should any more get listed. I'll keep any eye out. I have time.

If anyone has a parts list and/or Newark/Digikey/Mouser references that'd be appreciated too. I've already started my own research to better understand the variations between 5100, 5400, and TM500/5000 plug-ins. Not that I'm well versed yet. I figure next steps would be to find actual connector sockets to order, some ribbon cable, and then some plug-in boards. I recently saw a socket reference for the TM500, but I don't think that's the correct socket for the 5000 series. That's part of what I'm trying to figure out - are the 5000 series and TM500 sockets different?

Just thought I'd check before I start assembling my own.

Thanks,
Dave


Harvey White
 

The three series use the same connector, but with wildly different connections (at least between TMxxx and the 5xxx series scopes).  IIRC, there are keyways used to keep one piece of equipment out of an incompatible one.

Harvey

On 8/20/2021 4:06 PM, Dave Peterson via groups.io wrote:
If anyone has a line on a pair of 5000 series extenders, 067-0645-03, I'd appreciate the reference.

I do see a couple on eBay, but they are of course on the pricey side. For those prices I'm more inclined to research and build a DIY solution.

I've done a little research on here and I understand there have been some kits at times. That they also occasionally show up online for a reasonable price has led me to setup an automated notice should any more get listed. I'll keep any eye out. I have time.

If anyone has a parts list and/or Newark/Digikey/Mouser references that'd be appreciated too. I've already started my own research to better understand the variations between 5100, 5400, and TM500/5000 plug-ins. Not that I'm well versed yet. I figure next steps would be to find actual connector sockets to order, some ribbon cable, and then some plug-in boards. I recently saw a socket reference for the TM500, but I don't think that's the correct socket for the 5000 series. That's part of what I'm trying to figure out - are the 5000 series and TM500 sockets different?

Just thought I'd check before I start assembling my own.

Thanks,
Dave





Dave Peterson
 

Yes, I made a little spreadsheet of the interfaces for my own benefit, including the block-outs. Previously I quickly discovered the incompatibility of the 5400 plug-ins with the 5100's. Fortunately the keyways and RTFM Jeff D. showed me the error of my ways and kept me from damaging anything.

I am curious to know if the 5000 series 067-0645-03 would, in theory, work in the TM500 (067-0645-02), and vice-versa. Differing part numbers leads me to believe not. But I still don't know what the physical difference between the connector sockets is (aside from keyways).

On Friday, August 20, 2021, 1:29:37 PM PDT, Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info> wrote:

The three series use the same connector, but with wildly different
connections (at least between TMxxx and the 5xxx series scopes).  IIRC,
there are keyways used to keep one piece of equipment out of an
incompatible one.

Harvey


On 8/20/2021 4:06 PM, Dave Peterson via groups.io wrote:
If anyone has a line on a pair of 5000 series extenders, 067-0645-03, I'd appreciate the reference.

I do see a couple on eBay, but they are of course on the pricey side. For those prices I'm more inclined to research and build a DIY solution.

I've done a little research on here and I understand there have been some kits at times. That they also occasionally show up online for a reasonable price has led me to setup an automated notice should any more get listed. I'll keep any eye out. I have time.

If anyone has a parts list and/or Newark/Digikey/Mouser references that'd be appreciated too. I've already started my own research to better understand the variations between 5100, 5400, and TM500/5000 plug-ins. Not that I'm well versed yet. I figure next steps would be to find actual connector sockets to order, some ribbon cable, and then some plug-in boards. I recently saw a socket reference for the TM500, but I don't think that's the correct socket for the 5000 series. That's part of what I'm trying to figure out - are the 5000 series and TM500 sockets different?

Just thought I'd check before I start assembling my own.

Thanks,
Dave






SCMenasian
 

Since you might want a DIY solution, I can suggest 2 possibilities.

The first is to buy a JAMMA harness on eBay and modify it. This invoves separating a coupe of
bridge contacts and cutting a keying slot in the right position. In my case, I completely removed its cable since I had some nice multiconductor fat cable and reassembled it with the correct wiring. It's been working well ever since. I never got around to installing a key in the female side; so, I'm always careful to plug the module into it in the correct orientation.

After I did that, I found this on ebay:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/293628927428

You get a board with 2 male connectors, back to back. If you cut the board in half, you will have 2 male connectors. I will use it when I make custom modules; but, one can use a standard female connector with it to make an extender.


Ke-Fong Lin
 

If anyone has a parts list and/or Newark/Digikey/Mouser references that'd be
appreciated too. I've already started my own research to better understand the
variations between 5100, 5400, and TM500/5000 plug-ins.
5000 series scope plug-ins have two "notches" vs only one for TM500/5000. And the notches are at different place.
Other than that, they are the same PCB edge connector.
For TM500/5000 part lists and gerber take a look here : https://github.com/anotherlin/tek_tm_ext


 

Dave,

my layout for the TM500 protoboard could be easily modified to serve as a 5000-series extender. It would just require changing where the key slots are. I need to do a second run on that board with both the mods I’ve thought of, and with the proper production options to get gold plating. I could make a copy of the project and mod it for the 5000-series.

— Jeff Dutky


Dave Peterson
 

Jeff,

I tried your board on the 5110 (5103N) last night and it worked fine. When I tried it on one of the TM503s it would not fit the interface connector. I think you've said before it's a little too wide. It did make me want to look up the part numbers, and perhaps some data sheets to get exact dimensions.


I wouldn't hack up your proto-board to use as an extender - it's too nice for that! The eBay listing sent by SCMenasian is an excellent choice, but even further searching for JAMMA harness show that perhaps these can be used directly? I'll have to study their dimensions. Or perhaps just order one or two and try 'em out.


The real difference seems to boil down to the slots and blocks in the connectors that keep one from making potentially disastrous reversed connections. Or perhaps illegal plug-in mainframe mismatches. I'd like to think I'd be careful enough to avoid that. DIY doesn't have to be idiot proof.

On Friday, August 20, 2021, 3:30:08 PM PDT, Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Dave,

my layout for the TM500 protoboard could be easily modified to serve as a 5000-series extender. It would just require changing where the key slots are. I need to do a second run on that board with both the mods I’ve thought of, and with the proper production options to get gold plating. I could make a copy of the project and mod it for the 5000-series.

— Jeff Dutky


 

Dave,

That's odd. I tried every board in my TM504 and they all fit. They did seem to be a little too wide when I got them from the manufacturer, but I filed each of them down (if you look on your board there should be a check mark by the mounting hole next to pins #27 and #28 on the component side; that check means that I filed that board down and checked that it fit in the power module). They obviously only fit in one direction, with pin #1 at the bottom, so did you have the board inserted upside down?

That suggests a change I should make in revision 1.1: add a "this side UP" label.

The card edge contact spacing is standard, so those JAMMA boards should fit, if you can cut the proper key slots. I would think that this would be easy to do with a Dremel tool. The "standard JAMMA" side of the board may not fit in the TM500 backplane: the key slot is not BETWEEN positions #6 and #7, but actually takes the place of position #7 entirely.The other side of the adapter, however, can probably be made to work. That said, it would only be slightly more expensive to design your own extender cards and have them made by a PCB house. My proto cards only cost about $5 each. The hardest part was the waiting.

I would avoid cutting 5000-series slots in my proto boards because I would not want to have a board lying around that could accidentally be inserted into the wrong backplane after I'd built some circuitry on it for the other backplane. My proto boards have key slots cut so that they will fit into any TM500 slot, regardless of the slot's capabilities. If you also cut the key slots for the 5000-series you would have a card that could be truly dangerous.

That suggests another change for revision 1.1: leave a small part of the feature key slots (at positions 19/20, 21/22, 23/24, and 25/26) blocked so that you need to cut them specifically for the target slot.

-- Jeff Dutky


Dave Peterson
 

I'm studying the edge connector space right now. Specifically the similarity and compatibility of Tektronix 5000 series, TM500/5000, and the JAMMA edge connector specs At this point it appears that the two edge connector physical characteristic standards are the same. But I'd like something more along the lines of concrete specs before I go spending money.

Jarod Cabot recently (see post 8/13/21) recommended 305-056-520-201 for the TM500. That finally gives me some pitch and spacing numbers. So far I am having a difficult time nailing down a physical spec for the JAMMA connector. I suspect that body didn't specify physical implementation and that the industry came to some commonality in the use of a 56 pin edge connectors.

In fact, I just read the Wikipedia page for JAMMA, and sure enough, Tektronix use of the 56 pin edge connector is noted in that article. Ok, I think I'm convinced.

There's a super cheap $11.99 JAMMA harness on Amazon that I can get next Tuesday. That gets me a 2 foot extension with no slots in the male edge connector. Looks like I might have to rewire it some, but two for $24 and some rework sure beats > $80 for one 067-0645-03.

Thanks all for the advice and insights. Yet another facet of the Tektronix universe I'm functionally familiar with now. I'll have to report back on how it works out.

On Friday, August 20, 2021, 09:14:12 PM PDT, Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Dave,

That's odd. I tried every board in my TM504 and they all fit. They did seem to be a little too wide when I got them from the manufacturer, but I filed each of them down (if you look on your board there should be a check mark by the mounting hole next to pins #27 and #28 on the component side; that check means that I filed that board down and checked that it fit in the power module). They obviously only fit in one direction, with pin #1 at the bottom, so did you have the board inserted upside down?

That suggests a change I should make in revision 1.1: add a "this side UP" label.

The card edge contact spacing is standard,  so those JAMMA boards should fit, if you can cut the proper key slots. I would think that this would be easy to do with a Dremel tool. The "standard JAMMA" side of the board may not fit in the TM500 backplane: the key slot is not BETWEEN positions #6 and #7, but actually takes the place of position #7 entirely.The other side of the adapter, however, can probably be made to work. That said, it would only be slightly more expensive to design your own extender cards and have them made by a PCB house. My proto cards only cost about $5 each. The hardest part was the waiting.

I would avoid cutting 5000-series slots in my proto boards because I would not want to have a board lying around that could accidentally be inserted into the wrong backplane after I'd built some circuitry on it for the other backplane. My proto boards have key slots cut so that they will fit into any TM500 slot, regardless of the slot's capabilities. If you also cut the key slots for the 5000-series you would have a card that could be truly dangerous.

That suggests another change for revision 1.1: leave a small part of the feature key slots (at positions 19/20, 21/22, 23/24, and 25/26) blocked so that you need to cut them specifically for the target slot.

-- Jeff Dutky


Andy Warner
 

Watch out - some of the JAMMA extender cards have single copper pours
spanning multiple connector locations, where the power rails are in the
arcade game use case. For TM500 use, I don’t care, and just make sure those
align with the upper part of the slot, where the mainframe pins are
uncommitted.

On Sat, Aug 21, 2021 at 00:06 Dave Peterson via groups.io <davidpinsf=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I'm studying the edge connector space right now. Specifically the
similarity and compatibility of Tektronix 5000 series, TM500/5000, and the
JAMMA edge connector specs At this point it appears that the two edge
connector physical characteristic standards are the same. But I'd like
something more along the lines of concrete specs before I go spending money.

Jarod Cabot recently (see post 8/13/21) recommended 305-056-520-201 for
the TM500. That finally gives me some pitch and spacing numbers. So far I
am having a difficult time nailing down a physical spec for the JAMMA
connector. I suspect that body didn't specify physical implementation and
that the industry came to some commonality in the use of a 56 pin edge
connectors.

In fact, I just read the Wikipedia page for JAMMA, and sure enough,
Tektronix use of the 56 pin edge connector is noted in that article. Ok, I
think I'm convinced.

There's a super cheap $11.99 JAMMA harness on Amazon that I can get next
Tuesday. That gets me a 2 foot extension with no slots in the male edge
connector. Looks like I might have to rewire it some, but two for $24 and
some rework sure beats > $80 for one 067-0645-03.

Thanks all for the advice and insights. Yet another facet of the Tektronix
universe I'm functionally familiar with now. I'll have to report back on
how it works out.



On Friday, August 20, 2021, 09:14:12 PM PDT, Jeff Dutky <
jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Dave,

That's odd. I tried every board in my TM504 and they all fit. They did
seem to be a little too wide when I got them from the manufacturer, but I
filed each of them down (if you look on your board there should be a check
mark by the mounting hole next to pins #27 and #28 on the component side;
that check means that I filed that board down and checked that it fit in
the power module). They obviously only fit in one direction, with pin #1 at
the bottom, so did you have the board inserted upside down?

That suggests a change I should make in revision 1.1: add a "this side UP"
label.

The card edge contact spacing is standard, so those JAMMA boards should
fit, if you can cut the proper key slots. I would think that this would be
easy to do with a Dremel tool. The "standard JAMMA" side of the board may
not fit in the TM500 backplane: the key slot is not BETWEEN positions #6
and #7, but actually takes the place of position #7 entirely.The other side
of the adapter, however, can probably be made to work. That said, it would
only be slightly more expensive to design your own extender cards and have
them made by a PCB house. My proto cards only cost about $5 each. The
hardest part was the waiting.

I would avoid cutting 5000-series slots in my proto boards because I would
not want to have a board lying around that could accidentally be inserted
into the wrong backplane after I'd built some circuitry on it for the other
backplane. My proto boards have key slots cut so that they will fit into
any TM500 slot, regardless of the slot's capabilities. If you also cut the
key slots for the 5000-series you would have a card that could be truly
dangerous.

That suggests another change for revision 1.1: leave a small part of the
feature key slots (at positions 19/20, 21/22, 23/24, and 25/26) blocked so
that you need to cut them specifically for the target slot.

-- Jeff Dutky











--
Andy


SCMenasian
 

A Dremel (or similar) tool will make quick work of these connections.


Andy Warner
 

True, but I thought it worth pointing out that you can choose to try and
buy one without that problem.

On Sat, Aug 21, 2021 at 08:18 SCMenasian <scm@menasians.com> wrote:

A Dremel (or similar) tool will make quick work of these connections.





--
Andy


Harvey White
 

What I did to replicate a TM500 plugin was to measure the connector finger width.  Then, knowing that the spacing is 0.156 inches, replicated the connector.  Since the connector is symmetric, notching the board required little more effort.  What you'd also want to do is to measure the slot on the TM500 motherboard, and make sure that your connector size and slot agree.  Printing out a paper copy and fitting it to a TM500 slot would be a good idea, ditto with the 5000 series scopes.

Perhaps a bit crude, but it works.

I found that the PC board house I use (SeeedStudio) can cut the key slot between pins without difficulty.

Since this was to be part of a project, I added a 5 volt regulator on the board, and brought out all the pins to two ribbon connectors.

Harvey

On 8/21/2021 1:06 AM, Dave Peterson via groups.io wrote:
I'm studying the edge connector space right now. Specifically the similarity and compatibility of Tektronix 5000 series, TM500/5000, and the JAMMA edge connector specs At this point it appears that the two edge connector physical characteristic standards are the same. But I'd like something more along the lines of concrete specs before I go spending money.

Jarod Cabot recently (see post 8/13/21) recommended 305-056-520-201 for the TM500. That finally gives me some pitch and spacing numbers. So far I am having a difficult time nailing down a physical spec for the JAMMA connector. I suspect that body didn't specify physical implementation and that the industry came to some commonality in the use of a 56 pin edge connectors.

In fact, I just read the Wikipedia page for JAMMA, and sure enough, Tektronix use of the 56 pin edge connector is noted in that article. Ok, I think I'm convinced.

There's a super cheap $11.99 JAMMA harness on Amazon that I can get next Tuesday. That gets me a 2 foot extension with no slots in the male edge connector. Looks like I might have to rewire it some, but two for $24 and some rework sure beats > $80 for one 067-0645-03.

Thanks all for the advice and insights. Yet another facet of the Tektronix universe I'm functionally familiar with now. I'll have to report back on how it works out.



On Friday, August 20, 2021, 09:14:12 PM PDT, Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:
Dave,

That's odd. I tried every board in my TM504 and they all fit. They did seem to be a little too wide when I got them from the manufacturer, but I filed each of them down (if you look on your board there should be a check mark by the mounting hole next to pins #27 and #28 on the component side; that check means that I filed that board down and checked that it fit in the power module). They obviously only fit in one direction, with pin #1 at the bottom, so did you have the board inserted upside down?

That suggests a change I should make in revision 1.1: add a "this side UP" label.

The card edge contact spacing is standard,  so those JAMMA boards should fit, if you can cut the proper key slots. I would think that this would be easy to do with a Dremel tool. The "standard JAMMA" side of the board may not fit in the TM500 backplane: the key slot is not BETWEEN positions #6 and #7, but actually takes the place of position #7 entirely.The other side of the adapter, however, can probably be made to work. That said, it would only be slightly more expensive to design your own extender cards and have them made by a PCB house. My proto cards only cost about $5 each. The hardest part was the waiting.

I would avoid cutting 5000-series slots in my proto boards because I would not want to have a board lying around that could accidentally be inserted into the wrong backplane after I'd built some circuitry on it for the other backplane. My proto boards have key slots cut so that they will fit into any TM500 slot, regardless of the slot's capabilities. If you also cut the key slots for the 5000-series you would have a card that could be truly dangerous.

That suggests another change for revision 1.1: leave a small part of the feature key slots (at positions 19/20, 21/22, 23/24, and 25/26) blocked so that you need to cut them specifically for the target slot.

-- Jeff Dutky










Harvey White
 

Be careful with those shorted pins.  Various plugins do use those pins and you can and will short out some things if the connector pins are shorted.

Harvey

On 8/21/2021 9:09 AM, Andy Warner wrote:
Watch out - some of the JAMMA extender cards have single copper pours
spanning multiple connector locations, where the power rails are in the
arcade game use case. For TM500 use, I don’t care, and just make sure those
align with the upper part of the slot, where the mainframe pins are
uncommitted.

On Sat, Aug 21, 2021 at 00:06 Dave Peterson via groups.io <davidpinsf=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I'm studying the edge connector space right now. Specifically the
similarity and compatibility of Tektronix 5000 series, TM500/5000, and the
JAMMA edge connector specs At this point it appears that the two edge
connector physical characteristic standards are the same. But I'd like
something more along the lines of concrete specs before I go spending money.

Jarod Cabot recently (see post 8/13/21) recommended 305-056-520-201 for
the TM500. That finally gives me some pitch and spacing numbers. So far I
am having a difficult time nailing down a physical spec for the JAMMA
connector. I suspect that body didn't specify physical implementation and
that the industry came to some commonality in the use of a 56 pin edge
connectors.

In fact, I just read the Wikipedia page for JAMMA, and sure enough,
Tektronix use of the 56 pin edge connector is noted in that article. Ok, I
think I'm convinced.

There's a super cheap $11.99 JAMMA harness on Amazon that I can get next
Tuesday. That gets me a 2 foot extension with no slots in the male edge
connector. Looks like I might have to rewire it some, but two for $24 and
some rework sure beats > $80 for one 067-0645-03.

Thanks all for the advice and insights. Yet another facet of the Tektronix
universe I'm functionally familiar with now. I'll have to report back on
how it works out.



On Friday, August 20, 2021, 09:14:12 PM PDT, Jeff Dutky <
jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Dave,

That's odd. I tried every board in my TM504 and they all fit. They did
seem to be a little too wide when I got them from the manufacturer, but I
filed each of them down (if you look on your board there should be a check
mark by the mounting hole next to pins #27 and #28 on the component side;
that check means that I filed that board down and checked that it fit in
the power module). They obviously only fit in one direction, with pin #1 at
the bottom, so did you have the board inserted upside down?

That suggests a change I should make in revision 1.1: add a "this side UP"
label.

The card edge contact spacing is standard, so those JAMMA boards should
fit, if you can cut the proper key slots. I would think that this would be
easy to do with a Dremel tool. The "standard JAMMA" side of the board may
not fit in the TM500 backplane: the key slot is not BETWEEN positions #6
and #7, but actually takes the place of position #7 entirely.The other side
of the adapter, however, can probably be made to work. That said, it would
only be slightly more expensive to design your own extender cards and have
them made by a PCB house. My proto cards only cost about $5 each. The
hardest part was the waiting.

I would avoid cutting 5000-series slots in my proto boards because I would
not want to have a board lying around that could accidentally be inserted
into the wrong backplane after I'd built some circuitry on it for the other
backplane. My proto boards have key slots cut so that they will fit into
any TM500 slot, regardless of the slot's capabilities. If you also cut the
key slots for the 5000-series you would have a card that could be truly
dangerous.

That suggests another change for revision 1.1: leave a small part of the
feature key slots (at positions 19/20, 21/22, 23/24, and 25/26) blocked so
that you need to cut them specifically for the target slot.

-- Jeff Dutky











--
Andy





 

My approach to designing the TM500 proto board was similar to Harvey’s, except I skipped the paper template. I just measured the board from a TM500 plug-in and drew it up in my EDA package. The key slots were just a matter of drawing them into the board outline. I did do multiple measurements of the contact spacing and card edge finger dimensions with calipers before I drew anything on the computer, just to be sure (it did not occur to me to look up the connector and see what the specs were, for some fool reason). Once the board was drawn up I did multiple validation measurements using the EDA package’s measurement tool, to verify contact and key slot spacing against my sample plug-in.

To layout the contacts I first drew a single contact position, copied and pasted it, and then carefully arranged it for my measured spacing. With a pair of contacts created I then repeated the process with the pair, then the quad, octet, etc, until I had 32 contacts with the correct spacing, then I deleted the unneeded contacts. It would have been smarter to set the package’s grid spacing to the connector’s spec beforehand, but I didn’t think of that (for some fool reason, again).

When I got the boards from my PCB house (I used JLCPCB) I discovered that they had changed the width of the boards very slightly, adding a fraction of a mm for some reason. The cards were very hard to insert into the backplane, as a result. I used a hand file to take tiny fraction of a mm off either side of the card edge connector fingers and that seemed to do the trick, even though the change was barely visible to the naked eye (you could feel it pretty well with a finger nail, however). This is why I marked the modified boards with check marks, because I’d never be sure I had corrected them otherwise,

Using the same method to make 5000-series extender would be easy enough. I don’t expect there will be much difficulty finding a card edge slot on Mouser of Digi-Key to fit the plug-ins, but I don’t think I’ve actually looked for those yet.

— Jeff Dutky


Harvey White
 

For equipment of this vintage, the standard spacing was 0.156. Higher density went to 0.1 inches, and there was a 0.125 in there somewhere.

A quick look at mouser shows 44 pin dual readout (not what we need) for 11 dollars or so.  All others are not in stock.

Amazon seems more reasonable, the JAMMA female connectors look decent enough, but check shipping and check prices for everything.


Harvey

On 8/21/2021 10:50 AM, Jeff Dutky wrote:
My approach to designing the TM500 proto board was similar to Harvey’s, except I skipped the paper template. I just measured the board from a TM500 plug-in and drew it up in my EDA package. The key slots were just a matter of drawing them into the board outline. I did do multiple measurements of the contact spacing and card edge finger dimensions with calipers before I drew anything on the computer, just to be sure (it did not occur to me to look up the connector and see what the specs were, for some fool reason). Once the board was drawn up I did multiple validation measurements using the EDA package’s measurement tool, to verify contact and key slot spacing against my sample plug-in.

To layout the contacts I first drew a single contact position, copied and pasted it, and then carefully arranged it for my measured spacing. With a pair of contacts created I then repeated the process with the pair, then the quad, octet, etc, until I had 32 contacts with the correct spacing, then I deleted the unneeded contacts. It would have been smarter to set the package’s grid spacing to the connector’s spec beforehand, but I didn’t think of that (for some fool reason, again).

When I got the boards from my PCB house (I used JLCPCB) I discovered that they had changed the width of the boards very slightly, adding a fraction of a mm for some reason. The cards were very hard to insert into the backplane, as a result. I used a hand file to take tiny fraction of a mm off either side of the card edge connector fingers and that seemed to do the trick, even though the change was barely visible to the naked eye (you could feel it pretty well with a finger nail, however). This is why I marked the modified boards with check marks, because I’d never be sure I had corrected them otherwise,

Using the same method to make 5000-series extender would be easy enough. I don’t expect there will be much difficulty finding a card edge slot on Mouser of Digi-Key to fit the plug-ins, but I don’t think I’ve actually looked for those yet.

— Jeff Dutky





Vince Vielhaber
 

On 08/21/2021 09:09 AM, Andy Warner wrote:
Watch out - some of the JAMMA extender cards have single copper pours
spanning multiple connector locations, where the power rails are in the
arcade game use case. For TM500 use, I don’t care, and just make sure those
align with the upper part of the slot, where the mainframe pins are
uncommitted.
Be careful there. I did the same thing and one module was using a couple of those pins and the tops blew off of a few ICs.


Vince.
--
Michigan VHF Corporation -- nobucks dot net
K8ZW - http://www.hamradio.fun


Jim Ford
 

About 20 years ago we used ITW Paktron 0.156 inch spacing connectors for lines that needed to pass more current than we were comfortable passing through those 0.1 inch spacing connectors with the 0.025 inch square pins.  Don't know if they are still made.  HTH.             Jim Ford  Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info> Date: 8/21/21 10:17 AM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Wanted: 5000 series extender(s) For equipment of this vintage, the standard spacing was 0.156. Higher density went to 0.1 inches, and there was a 0.125 in there somewhere.A quick look at mouser shows 44 pin dual readout (not what we need) for 11 dollars or so.  All others are not in stock.Amazon seems more reasonable, the JAMMA female connectors look decent enough, but check shipping and check prices for everything.HarveyOn 8/21/2021 10:50 AM, Jeff Dutky wrote:> My approach to designing the TM500 proto board was similar to Harvey’s, except I skipped the paper template. I just measured the board from a TM500 plug-in and drew it up in my EDA package. The key slots were just a matter of drawing them into the board outline. I did do multiple measurements of the contact spacing and card edge finger dimensions with calipers before I drew anything on the computer, just to be sure (it did not occur to me to look up the connector and see what the specs were, for some fool reason). Once the board was drawn up I did multiple validation measurements using the EDA package’s measurement tool, to verify contact and key slot spacing against my sample plug-in.>> To layout the contacts I first drew a single contact position, copied and pasted it, and then carefully arranged it for my measured spacing. With a pair of contacts created I then repeated the process with the pair, then the quad, octet, etc, until I had 32 contacts with the correct spacing, then I deleted the unneeded contacts. It would have been smarter to set the package’s grid spacing to the connector’s spec beforehand, but I didn’t think of that (for some fool reason, again).>> When I got the boards from my PCB house (I used JLCPCB) I discovered that they had changed the width of the boards very slightly, adding a fraction of a mm for some reason. The cards were very hard to insert into the backplane, as a result. I used a hand file to take tiny fraction of a mm off either side of the card edge connector fingers and that seemed to do the trick, even though the change was barely visible to the naked eye (you could feel it pretty well with a finger nail, however). This is why I marked the modified boards with check marks, because I’d never be sure I had corrected them otherwise,>> Using the same method to make 5000-series extender would be easy enough. I don’t expect there will be much difficulty finding a card edge slot on Mouser of Digi-Key to fit the plug-ins, but I don’t think I’ve actually looked for those yet.>> — Jeff Dutky>>> >>>


Harvey White
 

There are some molex connectors with that spacing, and heavier pins and sockets.  Far enough back <grin> they used to be used for PC (and apple) power connectors.

finding them may be fun, though.

Harvey

On 8/21/2021 4:58 PM, Jim Ford wrote:
About 20 years ago we used ITW Paktron 0.156 inch spacing connectors for lines that needed to pass more current than we were comfortable passing through those 0.1 inch spacing connectors with the 0.025 inch square pins.  Don't know if they are still made.  HTH.             Jim Ford  Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info> Date: 8/21/21 10:17 AM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Wanted: 5000 series extender(s) For equipment of this vintage, the standard spacing was 0.156. Higher density went to 0.1 inches, and there was a 0.125 in there somewhere.A quick look at mouser shows 44 pin dual readout (not what we need) for 11 dollars or so.  All others are not in stock.Amazon seems more reasonable, the JAMMA female connectors look decent enough, but check shipping and check prices for everything.HarveyOn 8/21/2021 10:50 AM, Jeff Dutky wrote:> My approach to designing the TM500 proto board was similar to Harvey’s, except I skipped the paper template. I just measured the board from a TM500 plug-in and drew it up in my EDA package. The key slots were just a matter of drawing them into the board outline. I did do multiple measurements of the contact spacing and card edge finger dimensions with calipers before I drew anything on the computer, just to be sure (it did not occur to me to look up the connector and see what the specs were, for some fool reason). Once the board was drawn up I did multiple validation measurements using the EDA package’s measurement tool, to verify contact and key slot spacing against my sample plug-in.>> To layout the contacts I first drew a single contact position, copied and pasted it, and then carefully arranged it for my measured spacing. With a pair of contacts created I then repeated the process with the pair, then the quad, octet, etc, until I had 32 contacts with the correct spacing, then I deleted the unneeded contacts. It would have been smarter to set the package’s grid spacing to the connector’s spec beforehand, but I didn’t think of that (for some fool reason, again).>> When I got the boards from my PCB house (I used JLCPCB) I discovered that they had changed the width of the boards very slightly, adding a fraction of a mm for some reason. The cards were very hard to insert into the backplane, as a result. I used a hand file to take tiny fraction of a mm off either side of the card edge connector fingers and that seemed to do the trick, even though the change was barely visible to the naked eye (you could feel it pretty well with a finger nail, however). This is why I marked the modified boards with check marks, because I’d never be sure I had corrected them otherwise,>> Using the same method to make 5000-series extender would be easy enough. I don’t expect there will be much difficulty finding a card edge slot on Mouser of Digi-Key to fit the plug-ins, but I don’t think I’ve actually looked for those yet.>> — Jeff Dutky>>> >>>



Andy Warner
 

I should clarify. This can happen if you use the the pcb that plugs into
the mainframe on a TM500, when you simply use the JAMMA extender as
bought, or when you would use it in a 5000 series scope (as per the OP.)

For the 5000 series scope, I would expect that:

1. The high speed signals would use coax (not present on JAMMA cables), so
you are likely to make a new cable harness.
2. Almost all the pins are used, unlike the TM500, that really leaves the
top pins uncommitted (until someone commits them.)

I was simply warning against buying the kind of JAMMA extenders that shorts
a bunch of pins out, that is all. As others have pointed out, it isn’t
fatal, and can be fixed, but I recommend taking the effort to avoid that
(and the resulting FR4 dust.)


On Sat, Aug 21, 2021 at 15:24 Vince Vielhaber <vev@michvhf.com> wrote:


On 08/21/2021 09:09 AM, Andy Warner wrote:
Watch out - some of the JAMMA extender cards have single copper pours
spanning multiple connector locations, where the power rails are in the
arcade game use case. For TM500 use, I don’t care, and just make sure
those
align with the upper part of the slot, where the mainframe pins are
uncommitted.
Be careful there. I did the same thing and one module was using a
couple of those pins and the tops blew off of a few ICs.


Vince.
--
Michigan VHF Corporation -- nobucks dot net
K8ZW - http://www.hamradio.fun





--
Andy