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Understanding drawings done using text characters

 

On Friday 5/15/2020 2:39PM in "Looking for a better in circuit ESR meter"
Chuck Harris posted a "text sketch" of an Engineer's ESR Meter. The text
sketch format created a lot confusion, left all but a few of you scratching
your heads, and required a flurry of follow-up posts to explain what was
meant by Chuck's sketch. Text sketches are a very simple method of drawing
using ASCII characters and a fixed-space font that probably originated on
Teletypes almost 100 years ago.

I'll bet most of the initial confusion was due to our members reading our
posts in a proportional font. First, you must display a text sketch in a
fixed space font like Courier or it is meaningless. Next, it helps
enormously if you know what each symbol means until you become literate at
reading these text sketches.

I created this key for your sketch which clarifies the meaning or purpose of
each symbol Chuck used. I recommend that everyone take a minute to display
Chuck's original text sketch (which I included below) in Courier font and
refer to my key to understand it.

Symbol Key for Chuck Harris' Engineer's ESR Meter
* This OS is an oscilloscope
* This FUNC is a Function Generator
* This O) is a BNC Connector (a capital O followed by a closed
parenthesis)
* This ==== is coax cable (a row of equal signs)
* This /// is a ground (three slashes in a row)
* This @ is a junction (the at symbol)
* This .. is a place holder symbol (a row of periods) to keep
everything lined up
* This | is a vertical wire or a lead for a component (the
vertical bar symbol)

Here is Chuck's original text sketch:
......................................
FUNC o)=======@.......................
......|.......|.......................
......|......10K......................
......|.......|.......................
OS...o)=======@============@===========> To cap
......|....................|..........
......|................. DIODE........
......|..................CLAMP.......@=>
......|....................|.........|
.....///..................///.......///

Dennis Tillman W7pF

victor.silva
 

Chuck's drawing could have been done on a napkin, probably in 1/10 the time.
Taken a picture with a smartphone and added as an attachment to his post.
Perfect example of the use of attachments, something to clarify the message at hand but probably doesn't belong in the pictures folder because it's only germane to the attached message.

--Victor

Chuck Harris
 

"==" is actually just a wire. Ordinarily I would use just a row of "--",
but for whatever reason, I thought it was clearer with the "==" signs.

The @ is there to pretty up turns in the wire, or to show junctions.

Ordinarily I would just use "+".

It is really too simple for us to spend all of this time on.

As to shooting a napkin sketch. Yes, in some ways that would be
easier, but not really, unless you are set up in just the right way
for doing so.

I can't use the email address that is registered with groups.io with
my cell phone, as it garf's up my archives. So, I don't. And groups.io
won't let me post from more than one email address (will it?). So, I would
have to set my phone's camera for low resolution photos, shoot the picture,
email it to my desk computer, go to my desk computer, download the picture,
write the post, and attach it.

I know that many of you would just use the google cloud for everything,
and bippity boppity boo, everything would just work. But I don't like
to make my life, and my records that easy to access. I don't like
google (READ: You kids get off of my lawn!).

And, yes, I have been doing simple schematics this way since I was using
teletypes on the ham bands... Since email didn't have mime types... I didn't
have to worry about groups.io ignoring my type font choices, and substituting
a hyper proportional font.

Imagine 10 periods taking less space than two characters.

All that for a simple schematic that caused more trouble than I ever
intended.

-Chuck Harris

Dennis Tillman W7pF wrote:

On Friday 5/15/2020 2:39PM in "Looking for a better in circuit ESR meter"
Chuck Harris posted a "text sketch" of an Engineer's ESR Meter. The text
sketch format created a lot confusion, left all but a few of you scratching
your heads, and required a flurry of follow-up posts to explain what was
meant by Chuck's sketch. Text sketches are a very simple method of drawing
using ASCII characters and a fixed-space font that probably originated on
Teletypes almost 100 years ago.

I'll bet most of the initial confusion was due to our members reading our
posts in a proportional font. First, you must display a text sketch in a
fixed space font like Courier or it is meaningless. Next, it helps
enormously if you know what each symbol means until you become literate at
reading these text sketches.

I created this key for your sketch which clarifies the meaning or purpose of
each symbol Chuck used. I recommend that everyone take a minute to display
Chuck's original text sketch (which I included below) in Courier font and
refer to my key to understand it.

Symbol Key for Chuck Harris' Engineer's ESR Meter
* This OS is an oscilloscope
* This FUNC is a Function Generator
* This O) is a BNC Connector (a capital O followed by a closed
parenthesis)
* This ==== is coax cable (a row of equal signs)
* This /// is a ground (three slashes in a row)
* This @ is a junction (the at symbol)
* This .. is a place holder symbol (a row of periods) to keep
everything lined up
* This | is a vertical wire or a lead for a component (the
vertical bar symbol)

Here is Chuck's original text sketch:
......................................
FUNC o)=======@.......................
......|.......|.......................
......|......10K......................
......|.......|.......................
OS...o)=======@============@===========> To cap
......|....................|..........
......|................. DIODE........
......|..................CLAMP.......@=>
......|....................|.........|
.....///..................///.......///

Dennis Tillman W7pF



Ralph Hartwell
 

All that for a simple schematic that caused more trouble than I ever intended.

-Chuck Harris

No good deed goes unpunished...