Topics

treasures (was: Tektronix 570)

John Griessen
 

On 1/12/20 2:06 PM, peter bunge wrote:
I think the best way to dispose of treasures is to sell as a lot really
cheap and not worry about how much you paid for it or how much it "could"
fetch. For now I am happy to upgrade, buy, sell, and trade if it is not too
much trouble.
That's the spirit. I'm 62, and having to reduce stuff a lot to move out of
an increasingly expensive city, Austin TX, to more enjoy outdoor life with
my wife. Some of the reduced stuff is going cheap and that's OK. I do enjoy
getting some of it to good homes even though it's not very cash rewarding.
The internet sales tax is quite a damper on that.

After the move, I'm looking forward to getting some MTA modules and a 70004A frame for them
especially after all this good guiding info Peter B And Paul B and Dave M
have been publishing on the HP list!

bill K7WXW
 

I started fixing test equipment because I had a soft spot for the Tektronix 485 and needed a scope when I started building electronics again. Someone that knew I had refurbished that scope, introduced me to someone else with a garage full of stuff destined for the dumpster. I couldn't bear to see that happen and took home twenty or thirty pieces of test equipment and RTTY gear. After the second rescue mission, I figured out that maybe I should stop telling people I repaired old test equipment for fun.

Truth is, my actual test equipment needs are relatively simple, so much of what I have acquired I will never use or, realistically, get around to refurbishing. After a lot of hemming and hawing I decided to separate the collection into two piles, one big and one very small. The big pile will be offered or sold. The small pile will be stuff I can reasonably say I will use.

As folks on this list can imagine, making the big pile big is difficult, as is coming to terms with the idea that, no matter what I'd like to see happen, much of this stuff will get dismantled and scrapped. When I feel sad about that I try to remember that everything comes to end and just enjoy my predilection for what is: an aging nerd's odd affection for a particular expression of long-past design and craftsmanship.

Eric
 

It does not strike me to wright often but in reading the treasures thread I though I shoul. So I would like to say thanks from one who is most likely the youngest guy in the room for creating a space where one can learn and expand on knowledge that is far to rapidly being lost. Also Thank you to those that have designed and build such wonderful equipment that is art in its design and construction. I am sure that this equipment could not be built today. I have several TM plugins that I have not been able to find modern equivalents for (SG 505’s). I am one of the few people my age that even had an oscilloscope in the house growing up. Dad had a 20 Mhz heath kit analog. But I was mainly a digital/computer guy through collage. 3 years ago, I decided to set up my bench. I had a cheap soldering iron and cheap power supply. And an industrial fluke DMM. I hit the deep end hard deciding I was going to restore and fully calibrate an analog scope. That scope was a 485. I had always wanted a scope but was too nervous to try especially, with the young person fear of anything over 120V. I know some people my age that are scared of a 9V battery cause It is 9V. Some one with that mentality is terrified of the 350V to 600V B+ in tube gear partly because the mentality of society it seems has gone from, we can and we will, to you cant it is dangerous. I do not share this handicap given my time as at tech for an amusement park working on everything from relay logic to animatronics and anything in between. I don’t know what it is now a days but I run in to techs who are scared of anything over 5V. I have also run in to techs that did not know how to use a DMM to check a battery if it was charged or not… hell I have run in to techs that think soldering is an advanced skill.

In short thank you for keeping the knowledge alive and be willing to pass it along. Along with the amazing gear to go with it. At least on ONE bench the treasures will remain that way and functional for another generation. I only hope when I am on the other side of that fence there is some one willing to continue. So if there are any instruments out there that I should have on the bench I am still building the lab/shop let me know and I will defiantly take a look.

Thanks again from most likely the youngest guy in the room.

On 1/13/2020 1:12 PM, bill K7WXW wrote:
I started fixing test equipment because I had a soft spot for the Tektronix 485 and needed a scope when I started building electronics again. Someone that knew I had refurbished that scope, introduced me to someone else with a garage full of stuff destined for the dumpster. I couldn't bear to see that happen and took home twenty or thirty pieces of test equipment and RTTY gear. After the second rescue mission, I figured out that maybe I should stop telling people I repaired old test equipment for fun.

Truth is, my actual test equipment needs are relatively simple, so much of what I have acquired I will never use or, realistically, get around to refurbishing. After a lot of hemming and hawing I decided to separate the collection into two piles, one big and one very small. The big pile will be offered or sold. The small pile will be stuff I can reasonably say I will use.

As folks on this list can imagine, making the big pile big is difficult, as is coming to terms with the idea that, no matter what I'd like to see happen, much of this stuff will get dismantled and scrapped. When I feel sad about that I try to remember that everything comes to end and just enjoy my predilection for what is: an aging nerd's odd affection for a particular expression of long-past design and craftsmanship.

Harvey White
 

Hmmm, well, I can guarantee I'm not the youngest one in the group.  I had an oscilloscope when I was in the 8th grade.  Not sure that I needed one, but I had one anyway.  Spent a lot of time doing video, TV cameras, and odd things during the next 4 years. Digital didn't properly exist (for me) until I was in college, then ended up going into microprocessors once through college (and a bit after).  Spent a bit of time playing with some high voltage circuits, so I'm not in the "OMG 12 volts!!!" school.

Soldering for some, *is* an advanced skill, because most of what they do is plug modules together.  If nothing can be replaced at the individual parts level, then you'll start to think modules.

If you design stuff, you think functional modules, and if you can, make *those* work.  That's specialized now.  Had a 512 and a 513D (P11 phosphor) when I was developing my own computer (yes... TTL, yes.. self designed... yes it worked, parts thereof....  Then the 6502 came along for 30 dollars (a lot!) but far cheaper than $100 (8080) and I went down that way.

The TM500 and TM5000 series are nice, somewhat dated, and still decent.  You can find some of the functions in other equipment, and then again, some you can't.

You've noticed that.  The scope calibration plugins I have not seen equivalents at all.  The audio analyzer plugins I have seen standalone audio analyzers.  DMMS and the like, power supplies, easy to come by.  Little modular scopes?  nope.

Harvey

On 1/13/2020 5:43 PM, Eric wrote:
It does not strike me to wright often but in reading the treasures thread I though I shoul. So I would like to say thanks from one who is most likely the youngest guy in the room for creating a space where one can learn and expand on knowledge that is far to rapidly being lost. Also Thank you to those that have designed and build such wonderful equipment that is art in its design and construction. I am sure that this equipment could not be built today. I have several TM plugins that I have not been able to find modern equivalents for (SG 505’s). I am one of the few people my age that even had an oscilloscope in the house growing up. Dad had a 20 Mhz heath kit analog. But I was mainly a digital/computer guy through collage. 3 years ago, I decided to set up my bench. I had a cheap soldering iron and cheap power supply. And an industrial fluke DMM. I hit the deep end hard deciding I was going to restore and fully calibrate an analog scope. That scope was a 485. I had always wanted a scope but was too nervous to try especially, with the young person fear of anything over 120V. I know some people my age that are scared of a 9V battery cause It is 9V. Some one with that mentality is terrified of the 350V to 600V B+ in tube gear partly because the mentality of society it seems has gone from, we can and we will, to you cant it is dangerous. I do not share this handicap given my time as at tech for an amusement park working on everything from relay logic to animatronics and anything in between. I don’t know what it is now a days but I run in to techs who are scared of anything over 5V. I have also run in to techs that did not know how to use a DMM to check a battery if it was charged or not… hell I have run in to techs that think soldering is an advanced skill.

In short thank you for keeping the knowledge alive and be willing to pass it along. Along with the amazing gear to go with it. At least on ONE bench the treasures will remain that way and functional for another generation. I only hope when I am on the other side of that fence there is some one willing to continue. So if there are any instruments out there that I should have on the bench I am still building the lab/shop let me know and I will defiantly take a look.

Thanks again from most likely the youngest guy in the room.

On 1/13/2020 1:12 PM, bill K7WXW wrote:
I started fixing test equipment because I had a soft spot for the Tektronix 485 and needed a scope when I started building electronics again. Someone that knew I had refurbished that scope, introduced me to someone else with a garage full of stuff destined for the dumpster. I couldn't bear to see that happen and took home twenty or thirty pieces of test equipment and RTTY gear. After the second rescue mission, I figured out that maybe I should stop telling people I repaired old test equipment for fun.

Truth is, my actual test equipment needs are relatively simple, so much of what I have acquired I will never use or, realistically, get around to refurbishing.  After a lot of hemming and hawing I decided to separate the collection into two piles, one big and one very small. The big pile will be offered or sold.  The small pile will be stuff I can reasonably say I will use.

As folks on this list can imagine, making the big pile big is difficult, as is coming to terms with the idea that, no matter what I'd like to see happen, much of this stuff will get dismantled and scrapped.  When I feel sad about that I try to remember that everything comes to end and just enjoy my predilection for what is: an aging nerd's odd affection for a particular expression of long-past design and craftsmanship.