Transporting a 500-Series Scope without Breaking the CRT


 

Any advice on what to check before transporting a 500-series scope? I know that there's some kind of clamp or brace for the CRT on these old scopes that can deteriorate with time. I'm planning to takes some closed-cell foam sheets tto brace the CRT if necessary, but I haven't found any pictures of how the CRT is mounted and would like some advanced warning.

I'll be picking the scope up tomorrow (Sunday, May 2nd), so quicker answers would be appreciated.

Thanks.

-- Jeff Dutky


Ed Breya
 

If carrying it yourself, it should be just fine if not banged around or dropped. Keep it upright in its normal operating position - never haul with the face down. Ed


 

Cool. Thanks Ed.

So I'll strap it right-side-up in the front seat, next to me. That should provide enough cushioning for the drive home.

I think there's a scope-mobile cart, as well, but that will fit in the back with room to spare, if the scope is up front.

-- Jeff Dutky


Paul Amaranth
 

As long as it's strapped in so it doesn't shift on a panic stop you should be fine.

Paul

On Sat, May 01, 2021 at 03:59:38PM -0700, Jeff Dutky wrote:
Cool. Thanks Ed.

So I'll strap it right-side-up in the front seat, next to me. That should provide enough cushioning for the drive home.

I think there's a scope-mobile cart, as well, but that will fit in the back with room to spare, if the scope is up front.

-- Jeff Dutky







!DSPAM:608ddd7617561784314281!
--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Manchester MI, USA
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC | Security, Systems & Software
paul@AuroraGrp.Com | Unix/Linux - We don't do windows


 

Paul,

I used to haul large CRTs (21" computer displays) this way, which are admittedly less finicky than an old tek scope, at least they never seemed to care about orientation, and I would seatbelt them in. They were all deep enough that the seatbelt was near its limit, so they were held in pretty securely that way. For this, however, I will try to pick up some bungie cords or something, to get a good strap around the seat back. I was going to bring some larger blocks of closed cell foam to give it some cushioning in case I had to put it in back, but I can use the same foam to wedge against the dash in front.

I'm still a little worried about the CRT mounting in the case. I can't seem to find the thread now (and maybe it wasn't in this group; maybe it was in a Facebook group I also belong to) where someone had moved a 500-series scope but some part of the CRT mounting hardware had failed and the neck had shattered. I'd really like to avoid that sort of tragedy if at all possible.

-- Jeff Dutky


Greg Muir
 

I'd be more worried abut my dashboard if the item weren't strapped in the seat.

As for hauling it in your seat, if you have a nice vehicle grab a couple of fluffy bath towels and throw them on the seat beforehand by placing one under the item and one between it and the seat back. That way you won't end up with permanent crush marks in your upholstery if it is that (to use the term of a Detroit car CEO) "mouse hair" style of fabric.

I frequently haul equipment in my vehicle by placing it in the rider's seat. The towels have saved the seat plus have prevented it from becoming dirty. And the seat belt works well for capturing big items.

Greg


David Holland
 

The rotator ring mechanism in the 575, and perhaps other scopes of that era
was made of nylon. The nylon splits, and the back end of the tube can
flop around a bit. Not alot mind you, it's still in a metal shield.

As Ed said, if you take care, don't drop it, don't knock it about, you
should be fine - at least till you can get it down on the bench and see
what state the mounting hardware is in.

I do agree to keep it off its face. If there's any loose bits of glass in
the tube, they'll for certain mark the phosphorus, but if that's the case,
the CRT will be suspect anyways.

Short of removing the CRT, and transporting it separately, I'm not sure
there's much else you can do - beyond being careful - of course.

David

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 8:19 PM Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Paul,

I used to haul large CRTs (21" computer displays) this way, which are
admittedly less finicky than an old tek scope, at least they never seemed
to care about orientation, and I would seatbelt them in. They were all deep
enough that the seatbelt was near its limit, so they were held in pretty
securely that way. For this, however, I will try to pick up some bungie
cords or something, to get a good strap around the seat back. I was going
to bring some larger blocks of closed cell foam to give it some cushioning
in case I had to put it in back, but I can use the same foam to wedge
against the dash in front.

I'm still a little worried about the CRT mounting in the case. I can't
seem to find the thread now (and maybe it wasn't in this group; maybe it
was in a Facebook group I also belong to) where someone had moved a
500-series scope but some part of the CRT mounting hardware had failed and
the neck had shattered. I'd really like to avoid that sort of tragedy if at
all possible.

-- Jeff Dutky






Dave Seiter
 

It should be fine as long as you don't pretend you work for UPS and toss it onto your porch or over a fence!
-Dave
--------------------
Short of removing the CRT, and transporting it separately, I'm not sure
there's much else you can do - beyond being careful - of course.

David

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 8:19 PM Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Paul,

I used to haul large CRTs (21" computer displays) this way, which are
admittedly less finicky than an old tek scope, at least they never seemed
to care about orientation, and I would seatbelt them in. They were all deep
enough that the seatbelt was near its limit, so they were held in pretty
securely that way. For this, however, I will try to pick up some bungie
cords or something, to get a good strap around the seat back. I was going
to bring some larger blocks of closed cell foam to give it some cushioning
in case I had to put it in back, but I can use the same foam to wedge
against the dash in front.

I'm still a little worried about the CRT mounting in the case. I can't
seem to find the thread now (and maybe it wasn't in this group; maybe it
was in a Facebook group I also belong to) where someone had moved a
500-series scope but some part of the CRT mounting hardware had failed and
the neck had shattered. I'd really like to avoid that sort of tragedy if at
all possible.

-- Jeff Dutky






Liam Perkins
 

Here' a page on the last of 7 Tek 570s I've owned and sold:


https://www.pearl-hifi.com/07_Facility_Tour/Tek_570_005580/Tek_570_005580.html

and a page on it being crated to go to Japan:


https://www.pearl-hifi.com/07_Facility_Tour/Tek_570_005580/Crating/index.html

Note that the fan is well secured.

I once bought a 575 off eBay that looked and sounded for all the world
like it'd been handled by Ace Ventura in, "The Pet Detective":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xicKEpMJz58

Hearing the UPS truck pull up I went to the front door and heard poor
old Bob my good guy, UPS guy come up the front walk with it and sitting
down on the stoop he was embarrassed.

I said, "Old son, you're havin' a hang while I open this trash, I need
you to see it for the shipping claim I'll be making while you're driving
away."

He said, "For this one I have the rest of the afternoon."

UPS had dropped it on every corner, off every loading dock between Ft.
Lauderdale, FL and Calgary, AB and it was -junk- inside.

The world class coup de grace however was that the fan had broken free
of its 60yo mounts to flail around inside like a Morning Star in a Medieval
horror flick, like so:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xicKEpMJz58

Even the CRT was smashed. I called the seller asking, in short, "WTF ?"

They immediately refunded saying, "Keep the scrap, maybe there's
something useful left." which I did and which there was.

Best,
Liam

On Sat, May 1, 2021 at 4:35 PM Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Any advice on what to check before transporting a 500-series scope? I know
that there's some kind of clamp or brace for the CRT on these old scopes
that can deteriorate with time. I'm planning to takes some closed-cell foam
sheets tto brace the CRT if necessary, but I haven't found any pictures of
how the CRT is mounted and would like some advanced warning.

I'll be picking the scope up tomorrow (Sunday, May 2nd), so quicker
answers would be appreciated.

Thanks.

-- Jeff Dutky






Harvey White
 

Remember that this was after shipping with Gorillas 'R' Us.

Where if it can't withstand a 7 foot drop off a loading dock (especially if it's labeled fragile) it becomes your problem.

Harvey

On 5/1/2021 8:19 PM, Jeff Dutky wrote:
Paul,

I used to haul large CRTs (21" computer displays) this way, which are admittedly less finicky than an old tek scope, at least they never seemed to care about orientation, and I would seatbelt them in. They were all deep enough that the seatbelt was near its limit, so they were held in pretty securely that way. For this, however, I will try to pick up some bungie cords or something, to get a good strap around the seat back. I was going to bring some larger blocks of closed cell foam to give it some cushioning in case I had to put it in back, but I can use the same foam to wedge against the dash in front.

I'm still a little worried about the CRT mounting in the case. I can't seem to find the thread now (and maybe it wasn't in this group; maybe it was in a Facebook group I also belong to) where someone had moved a 500-series scope but some part of the CRT mounting hardware had failed and the neck had shattered. I'd really like to avoid that sort of tragedy if at all possible.

-- Jeff Dutky





Steve Hendrix
 

At 2021-05-01 06:59 PM, Jeff Dutky via groups.io wrote:
So I'll strap it right-side-up in the front seat, next to me.
Better to strap it top-side-up instead of right-side-up <grin>.


Leon Robinson
 

Jeff

Take a screwdriver to remove the cover & a handfull of 8 or 11 inch tyraps just in case there is something wrong you can then secure it.


Leon Robinson  K5JLR

-------- Original message --------
From: Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com>
Date: 05/01/2021 7:19 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Transporting a 500-Series Scope without Breaking the CRT

Paul,

I used to haul large CRTs (21" computer displays) this way, which are admittedly less finicky than an old tek scope, at least they never seemed to care about orientation, and I would seatbelt them in. They were all deep enough that the seatbelt was near its limit, so they were held in pretty securely that way. For this, however, I will try to pick up some bungie cords or something, to get a good strap around the seat back. I was going to bring some larger blocks of closed cell foam to give it some cushioning in case I had to put it in back, but I can use the same foam to wedge against the dash in front.

I'm still a little worried about the CRT mounting in the case. I can't seem to find the thread now (and maybe it wasn't in this group; maybe it was in a Facebook group I also belong to) where someone had moved a 500-series scope but some part of the CRT mounting hardware had failed and the neck had shattered. I'd really like to avoid that sort of tragedy if at all possible.

-- Jeff Dutky


ChuckA
 

I've been reading this thread and am wondering what 500 scope are you moving and how far?

I've moved many of them in the back of my truck just wrapped in a moving blanket and secured so they can't slide around with no problems. This includes three 555's, shortest trip was about 40 miles the longest was 400 miles. I never opened them up when picked up, just wrap them up. I've either been really lucky or they are much more rugged then most people realize.

I do follow common sense, don't throw them in the truck and don't drop them.

 Chuck

On 5/2/2021 11:23 AM, Leon Robinson wrote:
Jeff

Take a screwdriver to remove the cover & a handfull of 8 or 11 inch tyraps just in case there is something wrong you can then secure it.


Leon Robinson  K5JLR

-------- Original message --------
From: Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com>
Date: 05/01/2021 7:19 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Transporting a 500-Series Scope without Breaking the CRT
Paul,

I used to haul large CRTs (21" computer displays) this way, which are admittedly less finicky than an old tek scope, at least they never seemed to care about orientation, and I would seatbelt them in. They were all deep enough that the seatbelt was near its limit, so they were held in pretty securely that way. For this, however, I will try to pick up some bungie cords or something, to get a good strap around the seat back. I was going to bring some larger blocks of closed cell foam to give it some cushioning in case I had to put it in back, but I can use the same foam to wedge against the dash in front.

I'm still a little worried about the CRT mounting in the case. I can't seem to find the thread now (and maybe it wasn't in this group; maybe it was in a Facebook group I also belong to) where someone had moved a 500-series scope but some part of the CRT mounting hardware had failed and the neck had shattered. I'd really like to avoid that sort of tragedy if at all possible.

-- Jeff Dutky








--
See Early TV at:

www.myvintagetv.com


Dave Seiter
 

They can be pretty rugged.  I bought a RM502 years ago and when it arrived there was almost no packing material in the box, and one corner of the front panel had breached the cardboard a little and was bent (not badly, but based on the listing photos, it was new damage).  After hearing so many tragic stories, I feared the worst, but the CRT was fine, and it worked great.  
-Dave

On Sunday, May 2, 2021, 09:07:11 AM PDT, ChuckA <chuck@myvintagetv.com> wrote:

I've been reading this thread and am wondering what 500 scope are you
moving and how far?

I've moved many of them in the back of my truck just wrapped in a moving
blanket and secured so they can't slide around with no problems. This
includes three 555's, shortest trip was about 40 miles the longest was
400 miles. I never opened them up when picked up, just wrap them up.
I've either been really lucky or they are much more rugged then most
people realize.

I do follow common sense, don't throw them in the truck and don't drop them.

 Chuck



On 5/2/2021 11:23 AM, Leon Robinson wrote:
Jeff

Take a screwdriver to remove the cover & a handfull of 8 or 11 inch tyraps just in case there is something wrong you can then secure it.


Leon Robinson  K5JLR

-------- Original message --------
From: Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com>
Date: 05/01/2021  7:19 PM  (GMT-06:00)
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Transporting a 500-Series Scope without Breaking the CRT
 
Paul,

I used to haul large CRTs (21" computer displays) this way, which are admittedly less finicky than an old tek scope, at least they never seemed to care about orientation, and I would seatbelt them in. They were all deep enough that the seatbelt was near its limit, so they were held in pretty securely that way. For this, however, I will try to pick up some bungie cords or something, to get a good strap around the seat back. I was going to bring some larger blocks of closed cell foam to give it some cushioning in case I had to put it in back, but I can use the same foam to wedge against the dash in front.

I'm still a little worried about the CRT mounting in the case. I can't seem to find the thread now (and maybe it wasn't in this group; maybe it was in a Facebook group I also belong to) where someone had moved a 500-series scope but some part of the CRT mounting hardware had failed and the neck had shattered. I'd really like to avoid that sort of tragedy if at all possible.

-- Jeff Dutky









--
See Early TV at:

www.myvintagetv.com


-
 

The biggest problem is that most shippers don't use common sense!
Especially UPS! I just shipped a well packed 575 from Maryland to Florida
via FedEx and it arrived fine. Many years ago I used to ship stuff via UPS
but I went into their shipping center one day and watched them throwing and
kicking boxes around and I said to myself "never again!". I briefly worked
for another company that also ships a LOT of TE via UPS and I've seen UPS
actually drive one of the forks on a forklift THROUGH packages and then
deny paying the insurance claim and claiming that the box wasn't properly
packed! No, Never Again! If I buy something and the seller only has an
account with UPS, as many of them do, I send them my FedEx account number
and tell them to drop the package off at FedEx and give them my account
number and FedEx takes it from there. I've only had one claim with FedEx
and they paid it quickly and with no difficulty. OTOH UPS has damaged
dozens of packages and has never paid a claim. Never Again!

On Sun, May 2, 2021 at 2:47 PM Dave Seiter <d.seiter@att.net> wrote:

They can be pretty rugged. I bought a RM502 years ago and when it
arrived there was almost no packing material in the box, and one corner of
the front panel had breached the cardboard a little and was bent (not
badly, but based on the listing photos, it was new damage). After hearing
so many tragic stories, I feared the worst, but the CRT was fine, and it
worked great.
-Dave
On Sunday, May 2, 2021, 09:07:11 AM PDT, ChuckA <chuck@myvintagetv.com>
wrote:

I've been reading this thread and am wondering what 500 scope are you
moving and how far?

I've moved many of them in the back of my truck just wrapped in a moving
blanket and secured so they can't slide around with no problems. This
includes three 555's, shortest trip was about 40 miles the longest was
400 miles. I never opened them up when picked up, just wrap them up.
I've either been really lucky or they are much more rugged then most
people realize.

I do follow common sense, don't throw them in the truck and don't drop
them.

Chuck



On 5/2/2021 11:23 AM, Leon Robinson wrote:
Jeff

Take a screwdriver to remove the cover & a handfull of 8 or 11 inch
tyraps just in case there is something wrong you can then secure it.


Leon Robinson K5JLR

-------- Original message --------
From: Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com>
Date: 05/01/2021 7:19 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Transporting a 500-Series Scope without
Breaking the CRT

Paul,

I used to haul large CRTs (21" computer displays) this way, which are
admittedly less finicky than an old tek scope, at least they never seemed
to care about orientation, and I would seatbelt them in. They were all deep
enough that the seatbelt was near its limit, so they were held in pretty
securely that way. For this, however, I will try to pick up some bungie
cords or something, to get a good strap around the seat back. I was going
to bring some larger blocks of closed cell foam to give it some cushioning
in case I had to put it in back, but I can use the same foam to wedge
against the dash in front.

I'm still a little worried about the CRT mounting in the case. I can't
seem to find the thread now (and maybe it wasn't in this group; maybe it
was in a Facebook group I also belong to) where someone had moved a
500-series scope but some part of the CRT mounting hardware had failed and
the neck had shattered. I'd really like to avoid that sort of tragedy if at
all possible.

-- Jeff Dutky









--
See Early TV at:

www.myvintagetv.com












 

Chuck,

I was picking up a 533A, and moving it about 15-20 miles, about half of that "highway" travel (this being the DC area, the highway travel averaged less they 40 mph).

I got the scope home without incident. I need to put some work into it before I can power it up, but it looks like it's in good condition. It's been in storage for something like 45 years, and it's a low serial number (003969) so it's easily 60 years old. The caps are likely dry as a bone. Some of the pots and switches could use some exercise and DeOxit.

It's a bit dusty (though I've seen much, much worse), and I'm working up my courage to clean it using Stan Griffiths' method. Of course I don't have an oven to bake it in afterwards (I could tent it with a dehumidifier, though, and let the DC summer provide the heat), so maybe the hose isn't the best idea.

I'm excited to get it working and experience a 500-series scope. My grandfather had one (I think) but it never worked in my lifetime, something about a bad transformer (maybe it was a 547?). I was also having an itch to try working on some vacuum tube equipment.

-- Jeff Dutky


ChuckA
 

Jeff

Most of the scopes I've picked up have been in storage for many years and lots of dust. I usually just do cleaning with a compressor for dust and loose dirt and lots of elbow grease for stubborn dirt.

Never tried to clean a complete one with a hose. I have used the dishwasher for cleaning plugins with good results.

Chuck

On 5/2/2021 7:38 PM, Jeff Dutky wrote:
Chuck,

I was picking up a 533A, and moving it about 15-20 miles, about half of that "highway" travel (this being the DC area, the highway travel averaged less they 40 mph).

I got the scope home without incident. I need to put some work into it before I can power it up, but it looks like it's in good condition. It's been in storage for something like 45 years, and it's a low serial number (003969) so it's easily 60 years old. The caps are likely dry as a bone. Some of the pots and switches could use some exercise and DeOxit.

It's a bit dusty (though I've seen much, much worse), and I'm working up my courage to clean it using Stan Griffiths' method. Of course I don't have an oven to bake it in afterwards (I could tent it with a dehumidifier, though, and let the DC summer provide the heat), so maybe the hose isn't the best idea.

I'm excited to get it working and experience a 500-series scope. My grandfather had one (I think) but it never worked in my lifetime, something about a bad transformer (maybe it was a 547?). I was also having an itch to try working on some vacuum tube equipment.

-- Jeff Dutky





--
See Early TV at:

www.myvintagetv.com


Dave Seiter
 

These days it really doesn't matter who you ship through- they're all the same.  Everyone uses robots/conveyors for sorting, and UPS/USPS share some facilities.  A few months ago I shipped a (well packed) delicate item via Fedex, and asked them to put a fragile sticker on it.  The guy did, but warned me that it only applied to human handlers; the robots don't care and will still toss them around.   If you want careful shipping, it's got to be on a pallet with shockwatch, etc.  At least then you'll know it if was dropped and/or tipped over.
Of course it's not just shippers- one of my 7104s was hit by a forklift at Telogy.  It just kissed the left front of the unit, but that was all it needed, the CRT was toast.
-Dave

On Sunday, May 2, 2021, 12:48:19 PM PDT, - <rrrr6789@gmail.com> wrote:

  The biggest problem is that most shippers don't use common sense!
Especially UPS! I just shipped a well packed 575 from Maryland to Florida
via FedEx and it arrived fine.  Many years ago I used to ship stuff via UPS
but I went into their shipping center one day and watched them throwing and
kicking boxes around and I said to myself "never again!".  I briefly worked
for another company that also ships a LOT of TE via UPS and I've seen UPS
actually drive one of the forks on a forklift THROUGH packages and then
deny paying the insurance claim and claiming that the box wasn't properly
packed!  No, Never Again! If I buy something and the seller only has an
account with UPS, as many of them do, I send them my FedEx account number
and tell them to drop the package off at FedEx and give them my account
number and FedEx takes it from there.  I've only had one claim with FedEx
and they paid it quickly and with no difficulty.  OTOH UPS has damaged
dozens of packages and has never paid a claim.  Never Again!

On Sun, May 2, 2021 at 2:47 PM Dave Seiter <d.seiter@att.net> wrote:

  They can be pretty rugged.  I bought a RM502 years ago and when it
arrived there was almost no packing material in the box, and one corner of
the front panel had breached the cardboard a little and was bent (not
badly, but based on the listing photos, it was new damage).  After hearing
so many tragic stories, I feared the worst, but the CRT was fine, and it
worked great.
-Dave
    On Sunday, May 2, 2021, 09:07:11 AM PDT, ChuckA <chuck@myvintagetv.com>
wrote:

  I've been reading this thread and am wondering what 500 scope are you
moving and how far?

I've moved many of them in the back of my truck just wrapped in a moving
blanket and secured so they can't slide around with no problems. This
includes three 555's, shortest trip was about 40 miles the longest was
400 miles. I never opened them up when picked up, just wrap them up.
I've either been really lucky or they are much more rugged then most
people realize.

I do follow common sense, don't throw them in the truck and don't drop
them.

  Chuck



On 5/2/2021 11:23 AM, Leon Robinson wrote:
Jeff

Take a screwdriver to remove the cover & a handfull of 8 or 11 inch
tyraps just in case there is something wrong you can then secure it.


Leon Robinson  K5JLR

-------- Original message --------
From: Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com>
Date: 05/01/2021  7:19 PM  (GMT-06:00)
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Transporting a 500-Series Scope without
Breaking the CRT

Paul,

I used to haul large CRTs (21" computer displays) this way, which are
admittedly less finicky than an old tek scope, at least they never seemed
to care about orientation, and I would seatbelt them in. They were all deep
enough that the seatbelt was near its limit, so they were held in pretty
securely that way. For this, however, I will try to pick up some bungie
cords or something, to get a good strap around the seat back. I was going
to bring some larger blocks of closed cell foam to give it some cushioning
in case I had to put it in back, but I can use the same foam to wedge
against the dash in front.

I'm still a little worried about the CRT mounting in the case. I can't
seem to find the thread now (and maybe it wasn't in this group; maybe it
was in a Facebook group I also belong to) where someone had moved a
500-series scope but some part of the CRT mounting hardware had failed and
the neck had shattered. I'd really like to avoid that sort of tragedy if at
all possible.

-- Jeff Dutky









--
See Early TV at:

www.myvintagetv.com












Greg Muir
 

Back in the late 90’s I had a small piece of equipment that was captured in a military shipping container consisting of 2” closed cell stiff foam shock absorbers around each corner of the unit faced with an aluminum layer on each one. The transit container consisted of .062” aluminum walls both inside and outside with a 3/8” layer of plywood sandwiched in between the aluminum. The unit itself weighed around 20 pounds with the container coming in a close second.

When received from UPS Ground the knobs (or at least the parts of them with the control shafts) were sticking out through the exterior aluminum. Needless to say the unit was toast. The UPS inspector tried to tell me that the unit was “inadequately packed.” I told him that my impression was that the container must have been dropped from at least a 10 foot height onto a concrete floor.

UPS begrudgingly reimbursed the cost of the unit but would not refund the shipping charges.

Greg


-
 

Greg,

I'm surprised to hear you say that UPS even sent an inspector out to look
at the item. I've never even heard of a UPS inspector and UPS has never
sent anyone to look at any of my damaged packages. They just automatically
say that the package wasn't packed properly.

UPS inspectors probably sub as Tooth Fairies or Unicorns when they're
not busy (sarcasm intended) inspecting packages for UPS.

On Mon, May 3, 2021 at 10:56 AM Greg Muir via groups.io <big_sky_explorer=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Back in the late 90’s I had a small piece of equipment that was captured
in a military shipping container consisting of 2” closed cell stiff foam
shock absorbers around each corner of the unit faced with an aluminum layer
on each one. The transit container consisted of .062” aluminum walls both
inside and outside with a 3/8” layer of plywood sandwiched in between the
aluminum. The unit itself weighed around 20 pounds with the container
coming in a close second.

When received from UPS Ground the knobs (or at least the parts of them
with the control shafts) were sticking out through the exterior aluminum.
Needless to say the unit was toast. The UPS inspector tried to tell me
that the unit was “inadequately packed.” I told him that my impression
was that the container must have been dropped from at least a 10 foot
height onto a concrete floor.

UPS begrudgingly reimbursed the cost of the unit but would not refund the
shipping charges.

Greg