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Tektronix CRT and LCD color


greenboxmaven
 

I was wandering YouTube and found a demonstration of a JVC color video monitor that used a Tektronix invention- a B&W CRT with an LCD color filter over it to produce field sequential color. What scopes used this? Did Tektronix ever make a video monitor using the technology? The pictures looked very good on the monitor, and you would never have to deal with purity, convergence, and de-guassing. There was a similar idea sold in about 1971 that used a mechanical belt color filter in front of a small B&W tv. The video signal was picked off at the picture tube socket, decoded for NTSC, and returned to the tube for the color filter in place at the moment. It worked fairly well, but small color TVs were becoming more affordable by the minute and the converter did not sell.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


Chuck Harris <cfharris@...>
 

Tektronix used it on several digital scopes, but I have
run into in mostly on the logic analyzer 1241.

The problem with the LCD shutter, that makes me avoid them
like the plague, is if you move your eyes, they will
change color while your eyes are in motion. It is very
distracting.

Those that remember the Apollo Moon landing, that had
color TV sets, will likely remember seeing strange videos
from inside of the capsule where the camera burst into
primary color halos whenever it was moved.

NASA used a similar shutter technology to reduce the
bandwidth required to send live color video over slow
telemetry channels.

-Chuck Harris

greenboxmaven via groups.io wrote:

I was wandering YouTube and found a demonstration of a JVC color video monitor that
used a Tektronix invention- a B&W CRT with an LCD color filter over it to produce
field sequential color.  What scopes used this? Did Tektronix ever make a video
monitor using the technology?   The pictures looked very good on the monitor, and you
would never have to deal with purity, convergence, and de-guassing.  There was a
similar idea sold in about 1971 that used a mechanical belt color filter in front of
a small B&W tv. The video signal was picked off at the picture tube socket, decoded
for NTSC, and returned to the tube for the color filter in place at the moment. It
worked fairly well, but small color TVs were becoming more affordable by the minute
and the converter did not sell.

      Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY







snapdiode
 

It's the DLP rainbow effect.


n49ex
 

The TDS6xx and 7xx digital scopes used this approach for color.


David Kuhn
 

"The TDS6xx and 7xx digital scopes used this approach for color."

And they are some of the prettiest color scopes I have ever seen next to
new ones out today. Their contrast is outstanding! I have three of that
1ghz series in my junk room waiting repair of the power supplies and data
acq boards.

Dave

On Tue, Feb 2, 2021 at 11:32 AM n49ex via groups.io <n49ex=aol.com@groups.io>
wrote:

The TDS6xx and 7xx digital scopes used this approach for color.