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Tek video: A Precision CRT (1955)

toby@...
 

Maybe ebay shippers would pack CRTs more carefully if they realised that
nobody makes them like this any more:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5dhfhMItQc&feature=youtu.be

Like other Tektronix manufacture videos (PCBs etc), a window into a lost
world of manufacturing.

--Toby

Roy Thistle
 

Hi Toby:
I've watched that very carefully, many times.
It requires some extrapolation on what they don't discuss; but, the pictures are really worth a thousand words.
If you are interested in CRT technology it's really a good view.
Best regards.

John Williams
 

Wow that is amazing. Not only the actual building process but the design and engineering that went into it. It interests me to see how little protection for the workers was required in those days. I didn’t see anyone using gloves, eye protection or breathing protection. How different that would be today. I did note that the fellow soldering the base wires in place did have several bandaids on a few fingers. I also noticed the use of a primitive computer. I think it was called a “slide rule.” Thanks for the link.

stevenhorii
 

For precision CRTs, it's hard to beat the high-resolution CRTs made for
film recorders in the days before laser light sources for these. Film
recorders made by Celco were used to convert digital imaging to film for
movies. These tubes were not designed to display a whole image at once. The
spot size was on the order of 1 micrometer. Celco even built special tools
for the characterization of CRT spot size. The spot was scanned across the
phosphor face one spot at a time for exposure on the film. For color, a
color filter was used and three exposures made. Deflection was magnetic and
precision deflection coils were made. The innards of the Celco recorder was
basically an optical bench. Though I describe what I know about the Celco
unit it is because I had one, not because I have any financial interest in
the company or worked for them. I believe the CRTs were built by Litton.
Anyone else ever work with these?

On Fri, Mar 13, 2020 at 6:16 PM John Williams <books4you@...> wrote:

Wow that is amazing. Not only the actual building process but the design
and engineering that went into it. It interests me to see how little
protection for the workers was required in those days. I didn’t see anyone
using gloves, eye protection or breathing protection. How different that
would be today. I did note that the fellow soldering the base wires in
place did have several bandaids on a few fingers. I also noticed the use
of a primitive computer. I think it was called a “slide rule.” Thanks for
the link.



Paul Amaranth
 

I liked the mechanical calculator; we had one of those in the lab when
I was back in college. Also the analog simulation to map out the
electrostatic fields was very clever. The amount of skilled hand
work was absolutely amazing.

It was also clear that most, if not all, of the equipment was shop-built.
Nothing off the shelf back then. Working in their engineering shop must
have been great fun.

Paul

On Fri, Mar 13, 2020 at 03:16:22PM -0700, John Williams wrote:
Wow that is amazing. Not only the actual building process but the design and engineering that went into it. It interests me to see how little protection for the workers was required in those days. I didn’t see anyone using gloves, eye protection or breathing protection. How different that would be today. I did note that the fellow soldering the base wires in place did have several bandaids on a few fingers. I also noticed the use of a primitive computer. I think it was called a “slide rule.” Thanks for the link.





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Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Manchester MI, USA
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC | Security, Systems & Software
paul@... | Unix & Windows