Tek Scopes found in old picture book


Dave Peterson
 

Hi All,

Thought folks might be entertained by this picture I found. Currently helping my wife with downsizing her mothers household. Came across this book:

https://www.amazon.com/One-Digital-Day-Microchip-Changing/dp/0812930312

And inside found:

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/266495/3272287?p=Name,,,20,0,0,0

How many Tek Scopes can you find? Any guesses what they're working on? And any chance anyone knows who is in the picture?

There wasn't any specific information on the picture in the book. The subject was more general computers in technology. The book is currently on a slow boat back home, so I might be able to do more research once I'm able to dig it back out.

Dave


 

Great find. Few pictures of these actually performing their job in a
real environment.

On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 7:55 AM Dave Peterson via groups.io
<davidpinsf=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi All,

Thought folks might be entertained by this picture I found. Currently helping my wife with downsizing her mothers household. Came across this book:

https://www.amazon.com/One-Digital-Day-Microchip-Changing/dp/0812930312

And inside found:

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/266495/3272287?p=Name,,,20,0,0,0

How many Tek Scopes can you find? Any guesses what they're working on? And any chance anyone knows who is in the picture?

There wasn't any specific information on the picture in the book. The subject was more general computers in technology. The book is currently on a slow boat back home, so I might be able to do more research once I'm able to dig it back out.

Dave





Tim Phillips
 

From Tim P (UK)
Early computers, such as Colossus, EDVAC, EDSAC, Whirlwind etc. were built
on open relay racks. I wonder if the photo shows a reconstruction, or
'working model' of an early machine. Any guesses on the date from the
'scopes and PCs in use ?
Tim



On Tue, 27 Jul 2021 at 07:12, cheater cheater <cheater00social@gmail.com>
wrote:

Great find. Few pictures of these actually performing their job in a
real environment.

On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 7:55 AM Dave Peterson via groups.io
<davidpinsf=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Hi All,

Thought folks might be entertained by this picture I found. Currently
helping my wife with downsizing her mothers household. Came across this
book:

https://www.amazon.com/One-Digital-Day-Microchip-Changing/dp/0812930312

And inside found:

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/266495/3272287?p=Name,,,20,0,0,0

How many Tek Scopes can you find? Any guesses what they're working on?
And any chance anyone knows who is in the picture?

There wasn't any specific information on the picture in the book. The
subject was more general computers in technology. The book is currently on
a slow boat back home, so I might be able to do more research once I'm able
to dig it back out.

Dave









cmjones01
 

On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 7:55 AM Dave Peterson via groups.io
<davidpinsf=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Thought folks might be entertained by this picture I found. Currently helping my wife with downsizing her mothers household. Came across this book:

https://www.amazon.com/One-Digital-Day-Microchip-Changing/dp/0812930312

And inside found:

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/266495/3272287?p=Name,,,20,0,0,0

How many Tek Scopes can you find? Any guesses what they're working on? And any chance anyone knows who is in the picture?
Interesting picture. It looks like they're working on a
valve/tube-based computer of some sort, and there's an odd mixture of
technology in use. What look like mid-1980s PCs with 500 series scopes
as well as a 453 (or 454) and various 465s or similar. I'd guess it's
a restoration project of some sort but I can't identify the computer.

Chris


 

I think the modules in the racks look a bit too complex to be digital modules. Perhaps its not a digital computer but an analogue one?

cheers
Martin


Dave Brown
 

The book was a collection of photos taken on 11 July 1997 -all round the world. More info here- http://www.againstallodds.com/odd

I think that's a std 13 amp UK type plug and plug board on the ground - the racks are on a computer floor but not tied down-they are on an angle that is not lined up with the floor tiles and have horizontal steadying bars on the bottom. Looks like whatever it is was shifted there from elsewhere.
DaveB, NZ

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Peterson via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, July 27, 2021 17:56
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tek Scopes found in old picture book

Hi All,

Thought folks might be entertained by this picture I found. Currently helping my wife with downsizing her mothers household. Came across this book:

https://www.amazon.com/One-Digital-Day-Microchip-Changing/dp/0812930312

And inside found:

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/photo/266495/3272287?p=Name,,,20,0,0,0

How many Tek Scopes can you find? Any guesses what they're working on? And any chance anyone knows who is in the picture?

There wasn't any specific information on the picture in the book. The subject was more general computers in technology. The book is currently on a slow boat back home, so I might be able to do more research once I'm able to dig it back out.

Dave


Chris Wilkson
 

I have that book! Very much an oversized coffee table type book. It's a fun one.
Intel gifted it to us when it was first published. Back when large employers still valued their employees happiness, blah, blah, blah...

IIRC, Intel worked with the author directly to make the book happen? Memory is fuzzy.
I think everything in the book took place within the space of 24 hours, somewhere on the globe. So it very much is a time capsule from that day.

I count at least 6 scopes in that picture.


 

Seven - one in the open relay rack in the middle right. But that might
be a vector scope, too, or a distortion meter.

On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 5:57 PM Chris Wilkson via groups.io
<cwilkson=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have that book! Very much an oversized coffee table type book. It's a fun one.
Intel gifted it to us when it was first published. Back when large employers still valued their employees happiness, blah, blah, blah...

IIRC, Intel worked with the author directly to make the book happen? Memory is fuzzy.
I think everything in the book took place within the space of 24 hours, somewhere on the globe. So it very much is a time capsule from that day.

I count at least 6 scopes in that picture.





lilacbarn
 

I agree with DaveB. UK type power sockets.
Rack equipment looks like very old stuff for 1997 - so restoration project of some sort.
Where are the DSO's for 1997?
Engineers/technicians - no ties - so quite casual and appropriate for the times?
Age of the people implies a retirement/volunteer project of some sort.
Round cans on many racks - possibly coils and capacitors or canned relays a plenty - not many tubes visible- so maybe old fashioned transmission equipment for telecomms.
The building is big! huge column in view suggests tall building with very high floor to ceiling maybe in a city somewhere.
Raised floor system suggests a commercial premises - not a hut at Bletchley Park.
Geoff.


Carsten Bormann
 

On 2021-07-27, at 19:11, cheater cheater <cheater00social@gmail.com> wrote:

Seven - one in the open relay rack in the middle right. But that might
be a vector scope, too, or a distortion meter.
Williams tube.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williams_tube

Grüße, Carsten


 

Manchester (Baby or Mark I) fits the bill:
- UK (mains sockets)
- Modules (with big, vertical cans, orientation), see photographs on-line
- Williams Tube (memory, also visible in photographs on the web)
- Restoration project (age and looks of instrumentation and two guys working on it)
- See "Manchester Baby: world's first stored program computer" on YouTube. I think I may even see one of the guys in the photograph in that video.

Raymond


 

On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 07:59 PM, Raymond Domp Frank wrote:


I think I may even see one of the guys in the photograph in that video.
That'd be Chris Burton in the video, the person in front in the photograph.

Raymond


redarlington
 

Yep, Manchester Baby it is. It's easy to match up parts with what's on
screen at 0:28 with the photograph.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cozcXiSSkwE

-Bob N3XKB

On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 12:05 PM Raymond Domp Frank <hewpatek@gmail.com>
wrote:

Manchester (Baby or Mark I) fits the bill:
- UK (mains sockets)
- Modules (with big, vertical cans, orientation), see photographs on-line
- Williams Tube (memory, also visible in photographs on the web)
- Restoration project (age and looks of instrumentation and two guys
working on it)
- See "Manchester Baby: world's first stored program computer" on YouTube.
I think I may even see one of the guys in the photograph in that video.

Raymond






John Atwood
 

The upside-down black and aluminum cylinders look like British 9-pin loctal tubes, or more correctly, valves. The shorter aluminum ones are likely the famous EF50 <https://www.dos4ever.com/EF50/EF50.html> (also called a VR. 91 or 10E/92b). Most EF50s are red, but I have some military surplus ones that have clear aluminum cans. The longer black ones are likely the Mullard EF55 (also called CV 173). The assemblies in the photo could be parts of an early post-war computer, but due to the lack of triodes are more likely radiation counters or the like.

Due to the moderately recent Tek scopes (475?) and PC clones in the picture, this has to be a vintage restoration project. BTW, I count six Tek scopes in the picture.

- John Atwood


Dave Brown
 

If you could check your book I would be interested to know if that picture is actually in it - the copy of it on archive.org does NOT have that picture in it! I suspect there were multiple printings of the book with minor (?) differences in content...
DaveB, NZ

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Chris Wilkson via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2021 03:57
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek Scopes found in old picture book

I have that book! Very much an oversized coffee table type book. It's a fun one.
Intel gifted it to us when it was first published. Back when large employers still valued their employees happiness, blah, blah, blah...

IIRC, Intel worked with the author directly to make the book happen? Memory is fuzzy.
I think everything in the book took place within the space of 24 hours, somewhere on the globe. So it very much is a time capsule from that day.

I count at least 6 scopes in that picture.


 

On Tue, Jul 27, 2021 at 7:32 PM Carsten Bormann <cabocabo@gmail.com> wrote:

On 2021-07-27, at 19:11, cheater cheater <cheater00social@gmail.com> wrote:

Seven - one in the open relay rack in the middle right. But that might
be a vector scope, too, or a distortion meter.
Williams tube.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williams_tube

Grüße, Carsten
You might be talking about the loose tube in a box at the bottom of
the picture. I mean a rack mounted unit between the two PCs. There are
two scopes and a third thing, in the rack, that also looks like a
scope. A Williams tube device has no front display because the front
of the tube is covered by the read-out plate.

BTW I tried getting in touch off list but haven't heard back :) Would
you mind checking :) thanks


Carsten Bormann
 

Williams tube.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williams_tube

Grüße, Carsten
You might be talking about the loose tube in a box at the bottom of
the picture. I mean a rack mounted unit between the two PCs.
Yes. See the picture at https://tzi.de/~cabo/IMG_1834.JPG
(because of the inexplicable restriction on sending attachments on this list, I just put it up in a random location. Copy that into the groups.io archive if you can stomach navigating that entirely unneeded bureaucracy) — zoom in to see the faint green image of the bits.

There are
two scopes and a third thing, in the rack, that also looks like a
scope. A Williams tube device has no front display because the front
of the tube is covered by the read-out plate.
The problem is — how do you debug a Williams tube?
I seem to remember that the makers of the Manchester Baby (SSEM [1]) just put another tube on the same signals so they could see what was written to the storage tubes (ah, [2] has the details). During restoration, they couldn’t get the original size display tube, so they have a half-size in the rack now.

BTW I tried getting in touch off list but haven't heard back :) Would
you mind checking :) thanks
Everything is on its way, thank you.

Grüße, Carsten

[1]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manchester_Baby
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manchester_Baby#Development_and_design


mikecaa
 

Think it's a replica Manchester baby at the Manchester computer museum. See below;

https://www.i-programmer.info/news/82-heritage/6016-google-celebrates-babys-65-years.html

Regards - Mike


Dave Peterson
 

And are those 400 series scopes I see hints of (blue screens) on the far right of the racks?

I'm back from our travels, but the book is now packed away in the shipment bound for home. I'll look up the picture credits when it arrives.

I could be wrong, but in my scan of the text when I came across the picture didn't say anything about the Manchester Baby, restoration, or anything of note w.r.t. the picture. I'm curious to read it now to see what it does say. I'm glad I brought it up with you all. What a fascinating back story. I'd love to give credit to the photographer, and wonder what his involvement was. Perhaps there's more to be had there? Unfortunately it has been a few years since.

My wife and I both worked at Intel back in the 90s. Actually never knew each other while there, but that's another story. Talk about getting off topic! This book must have been a 30th anniversary thing, and I'd left by then. I suspect she gifted this to her parents - we'd just met, so I don't ever recall seeing it before. Well, maybe. I recall Intel being a pretty fun place to work, and recall being rewarded nicely at times, and chastised by Andy at other times. I appreciated the gifts. Still have one sitting right behind the monitor I'm looking at. As well as my office art which is a layout plot of my first design there. Intel was my first job out of school, so I guess left a lasting impression. Probably why we decided to keep the book. Now my kids can deal with it when it's time to clean out my house! Along with a few scopes.


Thanks all for the background.
Dave

On Wednesday, July 28, 2021, 2:02:00 AM PDT, mikecaa <4sumik@gmail.com> wrote:

Think it's a replica Manchester baby at the Manchester computer museum. See below;

https://www.i-programmer.info/news/82-heritage/6016-google-celebrates-babys-65-years.html

Regards - Mike


 

That makes perfect sense, thanks Carsten!

Looking forward to the goods :-)

On Wed, Jul 28, 2021 at 9:07 AM Carsten Bormann <cabocabo@gmail.com> wrote:

Williams tube.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Williams_tube

Grüße, Carsten
You might be talking about the loose tube in a box at the bottom of
the picture. I mean a rack mounted unit between the two PCs.
Yes. See the picture at https://tzi.de/~cabo/IMG_1834.JPG
(because of the inexplicable restriction on sending attachments on this list, I just put it up in a random location. Copy that into the groups.io archive if you can stomach navigating that entirely unneeded bureaucracy) — zoom in to see the faint green image of the bits.

There are
two scopes and a third thing, in the rack, that also looks like a
scope. A Williams tube device has no front display because the front
of the tube is covered by the read-out plate.
The problem is — how do you debug a Williams tube?
I seem to remember that the makers of the Manchester Baby (SSEM [1]) just put another tube on the same signals so they could see what was written to the storage tubes (ah, [2] has the details). During restoration, they couldn’t get the original size display tube, so they have a half-size in the rack now.

BTW I tried getting in touch off list but haven't heard back :) Would
you mind checking :) thanks
Everything is on its way, thank you.

Grüße, Carsten

[1]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manchester_Baby
[2]: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manchester_Baby#Development_and_design