Tek 7103 found at auction in NM


John Griessen
 

On 8/22/21 1:09 PM, Clark Foley wrote:
I am not surprised that you found that unit in New Mexico. It was likely the property of Sandia National Labs or Los Alamos National Labs. The nuclear testing facilities in Nevada hosted many contractors such as EG&G and national lab personnel for conducting destructive transient measurements.
Yes, this had EG&G cal tags. Not sure if Sandia or Los Alamos origin though. The stuff comes form multiple companies wanting it off their books, some comes in oversize cardboard containers bigger than washing machine size, piled with microscopes and boxes and ??. Then Bentley Auction folks go through and photograph it for online only auctioning.

There were about 10 tons of env. chambers that disappeared between 7PM auction close and 2PM the next day when I picked up the 7103 scope -- some serious heavy buyers here in ABQ. Some of the old chambers with obsolete refrigerant may have gone to the scrap metal heap. Some nice controlled ovens got end user prices -- I missed out on a 575 deg F one with 40 step sequence ramp temp. controller.

The sticker on an Olympus BH microscope I won said US DOE contract xxxyyyxxx 1972 on a paper sticker that was done with a Selectric...
;-)


WA2VNV George
 

You should check that scope with a radiation detector. I know it's been used a long time ago. I worked at Brookhaven Labs in the past and we got a few surplus scopes from Sandia that slipped thru somehow and had radiation detected when we got them. We raised he'll with them! YMMV.Sent from my T-Mobile 5G Device


Dave Seiter
 

I got a geiger counter about 2008 because I was curious if any of the gear I was amassing at the time was hot.  None ever was.  I have a scintillator I've been meaning to restore that's much more sensitive, but I don't expect to find anything with that either.
-Dave

On Sunday, August 22, 2021, 03:08:45 PM PDT, WA2VNV George <wa2vnv@optonline.net> wrote:

You should check that scope with a radiation detector. I know it's been used a long time ago. I worked at Brookhaven Labs in the past and we got a few surplus scopes from Sandia that slipped thru somehow and had radiation detected when we got them. We raised he'll with them! YMMV.Sent from my T-Mobile 5G Device


Ke-Fong Lin
 

I got myself a geiger counter when I bought some TM500/5000 plug-ins with "PG&E Nuclear department" stickers.
I was scared of contamination!
It came handy when I came across a 7L5 with a french atomic energy sticker on it.
In both cases, nothing, just peace of mind.
Now I check all used gear I buy with it.


Roy Thistle
 

On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 03:08 PM, WA2VNV George wrote:


You should check that scope with a radiation detector.
Hi WA2VNV:
What type of radiation detector, and why? ( IMO... because I can get a GM tube, and it might be radioactive, doesn't seem a good answer?)

--
Roy Thistle


Jeff Kruth
 

Yeah, more worrying about nothing. I have bought loads of stuff from national labs, including actual radiation sensors from Oak Ridge that have been used with radioactive materials. My scintillation tube says all good. Remember, a scope is used in a lab to remotely monitor stuff, where people actually work. Health Physicists are very diligent in making sure stuff is clean.... Thats their job and the ones I have met are very serious people. Nice to make sure, of course, but nothing to worry over. Jeff Kruth In a message dated 8/23/2021 1:35:34 PM Eastern Standard Time, roy.thistle@mail.utoronto.ca writes: 
On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 03:08 PM, WA2VNV George wrote:


You should check that scope with a radiation detector.
Hi WA2VNV:
What type of radiation detector, and why? ( IMO... because I can get a GM tube, and it might be radioactive, doesn't seem a good answer?)

--
Roy Thistle


redarlington
 

Our process for salvaging old equipment from LANL requires us to state if
equipment has a known history and is not contaminated, or has an unknown
history, etc. Radiation work areas typically have portal monitors of
various sorts, but no process is perfect. If it has a known history,
equipment typically heads out to Bentley's Auction. I suspect Sandia may
have a similar process, but have no idea about WSMR.

-Bob

On Mon, Aug 23, 2021 at 4:00 AM Ke-Fong Lin <anotherlin@gmail.com> wrote:

I got myself a geiger counter when I bought some TM500/5000 plug-ins with
"PG&E Nuclear department" stickers.
I was scared of contamination!
It came handy when I came across a 7L5 with a french atomic energy sticker
on it.
In both cases, nothing, just peace of mind.
Now I check all used gear I buy with it.






Jim Ford
 

Yes, I have to wonder how different radiation detectors work. I'd assume they cover different wavelength/frequency/particle energy bands, however one is inclined to look at it. One size does not fit all, no doubt. Somebody more knowledgeable will need to reply.

Thanks.

Jim Ford in Southern California, where (some of) the solar radiation is being blocked by clouds at the moment.

------ Original Message ------
From: "Roy Thistle" <roy.thistle@mail.utoronto.ca>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 8/23/2021 12:35:28 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 7103 found at auction in NM

On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 03:08 PM, WA2VNV George wrote:


You should check that scope with a radiation detector.
Hi WA2VNV:
What type of radiation detector, and why? ( IMO... because I can get a GM tube, and it might be radioactive, doesn't seem a good answer?)

--
Roy Thistle





Zentronics42@...
 

Also with detectors that at TOO sensitive there are some tubes that measure "hot" just from the tube its self. They used uranium in the seals of the glass envelope. However these tubes tended to be on the larger side of things. Not what I would call signal or amplification tubes. These were more RF transmitter final tubes. Not a real danger they measure about as hot as a thoriated welding rod. Enough to set off a more sensitive counter. But never a bad Idea to check scopes that have been used in atomic research. I remember reading some where that Tek was one of the few companies that had to create a " Official decontamination procedure" for units that were exposed but they needed to be used again. 1 Ghz scopes would fall in this category I am sure due to cost to acquire.

Zen

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Ford
Sent: Monday, August 23, 2021 11:47 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 7103 found at auction in NM

Yes, I have to wonder how different radiation detectors work. I'd assume they cover different wavelength/frequency/particle energy bands, however one is inclined to look at it. One size does not fit all, no doubt. Somebody more knowledgeable will need to reply.

Thanks.

Jim Ford in Southern California, where (some of) the solar radiation is being blocked by clouds at the moment.

------ Original Message ------
From: "Roy Thistle" <roy.thistle@mail.utoronto.ca>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 8/23/2021 12:35:28 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 7103 found at auction in NM

On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 03:08 PM, WA2VNV George wrote:


You should check that scope with a radiation detector.
Hi WA2VNV:
What type of radiation detector, and why? ( IMO... because I can get a
GM tube, and it might be radioactive, doesn't seem a good answer?)

--
Roy Thistle





Clark Foley
 

It is true that these hygiene and safety guys are indeed diligent. They also investigate nearby junk yards and construction sites for illegally scavenged and contaminated equipment and tools. Beatty, NV has the occasionally hot item.
As for lab equipment, in those days people were not present during the event. Only after certifying that the area is safe did technicians return to gather data. Once a fully underground vault of test equipment was contaminated/destroyed due to a door failure. Everything was entombed for safety. We (Tek) got an urgent request for an immediate replacement of 10 or so R7103/7104s. That was a big task given that these were not high inventory items.

On Mon, Aug 23, 2021 at 10:44 AM, Jeff Kruth wrote:


Remember, a scope is used in a lab to remotely monitor stuff, where people
actually work. Health Physicists are very diligent in making sure stuff is
clean.... Thats their job and the ones I have met are very serious people.


stevenhorii
 

OK - this is OT, but members have been posting about radiation detectors
and detection.

A simple Geiger-Mueller (GM) detector is likely sufficient for most
checking of equipment for any intrinsic radioactivity or contamination my
radioactive materials. They are good at detecting gamma radiation. Some
will also detect beta, but requires a detector with thinner window than for
gamma detection because of the lower penetrability of beta particles. Beta
radiation (basically electrons) does have an energy spectrum, so high
energy electrons can actually result in radiation being produced by
shielding - the electrons result in x-ray generation. Alpha particles
(helium nuclei) are the easiest to shield against which can make detection
difficult. Some GM detectors use a detector tube that has a very thin
window to allow beta and alpha detection as well as gamma. Some detector
probes with a GM counter will have an end window for alpha and beta and the
side of the tube (which is thicker) for gamma. Scintillation detectors are
more sensitive and some portable units incorporate energy discrimination.
There are some interesting add-ons for a laptop or tablet that you download
the software, plug the device into a USB port, and connect the device to a
scintillator probe (usually the expensive part of the system). They usually
have either a built-in high-voltage supply for the scintillator probe (most
use a photomultiplier tube) or an outboard one. But these things turn your
laptop or tablet into a pretty full-featured radiation energy spectrum
system. You can actually identify what isotopes may be present with one of
these. I wonder if Tek or a third-party manufacturer ever made a plug-in
for one of the Tek scopes that would turn it into a gamma spectrometer. I
know some nuclear medicine systems had Tek displays with custom electronics
that did this.

There is also a question of what you are trying to measure. If all you want
to know is whether or not something is radioactive, then a counter (just
counts the emitted radiation) that displays counts/second would usually
suffice. To see whether something is "hotter" than background radiation,
you can simply move to where you know there is nothing potentially
radioactive and see what the count rate is. Of more interest is a meter
that displays dose. This is also complicated as there are measures of
exposure and dose. The former tells you what the exposure rate is, usually
measured in roentgens (R) or sometimes Coulomb/Kg. Absorbed dose is how
much radiation you would absorb given a dose rate. This is the unit of
importance as it is related to risk. Some GM systems provide a scale in
these units based on the detector and the calibrated absorption of the
detector. Units are the RAD (radiation absorbed dose) and Gray (Gy). Then
there are the units that those of us who use radiation (I'm a radiologist)
are most concerned about - the equivalent dose or effective dose. This
factors in both the absorbed dose and the medical effects. The units are
the rem (RAD equivalent man) or, because a full rem is a pretty sizeable
dose, millirem or mrem. For beta and gamma, it's usually assumed that 1 R =
1 RAD = 1 rem. Alpha is different. Though alpha radiation does not
penetrate very far in shielding materials, in the body it is potentially
very dangerous. While gamma radiation usually travels through the body and
betas are stopped by superficial soft tissues (the low energy ones anyway),
alphas have a comparatively large mass and so do not travel very far - that
means in their short distance traveled in the body, they can cause a lot of
damage. It is one of the reasons radon is dangerous - it is primarily an
alpha emitter (though its decay process does emit other radiation as well).
The same for thorium, mainly because radium and radon are part of the decay
chain of thorium and they are alpha emitters.

For those who use SI units for radiation measurement, the gray (Gy) is one
- the absorbed dose. The equivalent for the rem is the Sievert (Sv). One
gray (Gy) = 100 R and 1 Sievert (Sv) = 100 rem. For reference, background
radiation at sea level is about 300 mrem or 3 mSv per year.

Besides WW II aircraft instruments with radium paint on the dials (by the
way, just because they don't glow in the dark does not mean they do not
have radium paint or are non-radioactive - the phosphor mixed with the
radium usually breaks down over time, but the radium itself is still there)
and most WW II aircraft sextants, other surplus can be radioactive. Some
aerospace stuff used thoriated magnesium (improved the structural
properties) - including parts of the Apollo spacecraft. Gas lamp mantles
used thorium as well. I think the meters on the classic R-390A receiver had
radium - tipped pointers. I understood that some Nixie tubes (at least the
US- made ones) included a small tube of a radioactive gas to lower the
ionization threshold. I see a small tube in the base of some of the tubes,
but my radiation survey meters do not show any radiation getting out of the
tube.

Oh, and you can turn your cell phone (if it has a camera in it) into a
radiation detector:

https://hackaday.com/2012/01/15/turn-your-camera-phone-into-a-geiger-counter/

I showed this to my health physics guys and they said it would certainly
work, but they would not use it for any critical dose measurement stuff.
But to see if something is radioactive? Yep - it should work (note: I have
not tried it).

Steve H.

On Mon, Aug 23, 2021 at 2:14 PM <Zentronics42@gmail.com> wrote:

Also with detectors that at TOO sensitive there are some tubes that
measure "hot" just from the tube its self. They used uranium in the seals
of the glass envelope. However these tubes tended to be on the larger side
of things. Not what I would call signal or amplification tubes. These were
more RF transmitter final tubes. Not a real danger they measure about as
hot as a thoriated welding rod. Enough to set off a more sensitive counter.
But never a bad Idea to check scopes that have been used in atomic
research. I remember reading some where that Tek was one of the few
companies that had to create a " Official decontamination procedure" for
units that were exposed but they needed to be used again. 1 Ghz scopes
would fall in this category I am sure due to cost to acquire.

Zen

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Ford
Sent: Monday, August 23, 2021 11:47 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 7103 found at auction in NM

Yes, I have to wonder how different radiation detectors work. I'd assume
they cover different wavelength/frequency/particle energy bands, however
one is inclined to look at it. One size does not fit all, no doubt.
Somebody more knowledgeable will need to reply.

Thanks.

Jim Ford in Southern California, where (some of) the solar radiation is
being blocked by clouds at the moment.

------ Original Message ------
From: "Roy Thistle" <roy.thistle@mail.utoronto.ca>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 8/23/2021 12:35:28 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 7103 found at auction in NM

On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 03:08 PM, WA2VNV George wrote:


You should check that scope with a radiation detector.
Hi WA2VNV:
What type of radiation detector, and why? ( IMO... because I can get a
GM tube, and it might be radioactive, doesn't seem a good answer?)

--
Roy Thistle
















WA2VNV George
 

Hi WA2VNV:
What type of radiation detector, and why? ( IMO... because I can get a GM tube, and it might be radioactive, doesn't seem a good answer?)

Roy. If you read my message, I said, "I worked at Brookhaven Labs (BNL) in the past and we got a few surplus scopes from Sandia that slipped thru somehow and had radiation detected when we got them."

The scopes were HOT! Do you understand that?

George


Jeff Kruth
 

Hi Steve!Yep, third party folks bought 5000 series scopes and made multichannel analyzers (MCA's) out of them for energy spectrum. I have a couple in the back room. They have died and I dont want to troubleshoot early '70's uP units.... Jeff Kruth In a message dated 8/23/2021 3:47:55 PM Eastern Standard Time, sonodocsch@gmail.com writes: 
I wonder if Tek or a third-party manufacturer ever made a plug-in
for one of the Tek scopes that would turn it into a gamma spectrometer. I
know some nuclear medicine systems had Tek displays with custom electronics
that did this.


Jim Ford
 

I figured you would have the scoop, Steven, since you're a radiologist.          JimSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: stevenhorii <sonodocsch@gmail.com> Date: 8/23/21 12:47 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 7103 found at auction in NM OK - this is OT, but members have been posting about radiation detectorsand detection.A simple Geiger-Mueller (GM) detector is likely sufficient for mostchecking of equipment for any intrinsic radioactivity or contamination myradioactive materials. They are good at detecting gamma radiation. Somewill also detect beta, but requires a detector with thinner window than forgamma detection because of the lower penetrability of beta particles. Betaradiation (basically electrons) does have an energy spectrum, so highenergy electrons can actually result in radiation being produced byshielding - the electrons result in x-ray generation. Alpha particles(helium nuclei) are the easiest to shield against which can make detectiondifficult. Some GM detectors use a detector tube that has a very thinwindow to allow beta and alpha detection as well as gamma. Some detectorprobes with a GM counter will have an end window for alpha and beta and theside of the tube (which is thicker) for gamma. Scintillation detectors aremore sensitive and some portable units incorporate energy discrimination.There are some interesting add-ons for a laptop or tablet that you downloadthe software, plug the device into a USB port, and connect the device to ascintillator probe (usually the expensive part of the system). They usuallyhave either a built-in high-voltage supply for the scintillator probe (mostuse a photomultiplier tube) or an outboard one. But these things turn yourlaptop or tablet into a pretty full-featured radiation energy spectrumsystem. You can actually identify what isotopes may be present with one ofthese. I wonder if Tek or a third-party manufacturer ever made a plug-infor one of the Tek scopes that would turn it into a gamma spectrometer. Iknow some nuclear medicine systems had Tek displays with custom electronicsthat did this.There is also a question of what you are trying to measure. If all you wantto know is whether or not something is radioactive, then a counter (justcounts the emitted radiation) that displays counts/second would usuallysuffice. To see whether something is "hotter" than background radiation,you can simply move to where you know there is nothing potentiallyradioactive and see what the count rate is. Of more interest is a meterthat displays dose. This is also complicated as there are measures ofexposure and dose. The former tells you what the exposure rate is, usuallymeasured in roentgens (R) or sometimes Coulomb/Kg. Absorbed dose is howmuch radiation you would absorb given a dose rate. This is the unit ofimportance as it is related to risk. Some GM systems provide a scale inthese units based on the detector and the calibrated absorption of thedetector. Units are the RAD (radiation absorbed dose) and Gray (Gy). Thenthere are the units that those of us who use radiation (I'm a radiologist)are most concerned about - the equivalent dose or effective dose. Thisfactors in both the absorbed dose and the medical effects. The units arethe rem (RAD equivalent man) or, because a full rem is a pretty sizeabledose, millirem or mrem. For beta and gamma, it's usually assumed that 1 R =1 RAD = 1 rem. Alpha is different. Though alpha radiation does notpenetrate very far in shielding materials, in the body it is potentiallyvery dangerous. While gamma radiation usually travels through the body andbetas are stopped by superficial soft tissues (the low energy ones anyway),alphas have a comparatively large mass and so do not travel very far - thatmeans in their short distance traveled in the body, they can cause a lot ofdamage. It is one of the reasons radon is dangerous - it is primarily analpha emitter (though its decay process does emit other radiation as well).The same for thorium, mainly because radium and radon are part of the decaychain of thorium and they are alpha emitters.For those who use SI units for radiation measurement, the gray (Gy) is one- the absorbed dose. The equivalent for the rem is the Sievert (Sv). Onegray (Gy) = 100 R and 1 Sievert (Sv) = 100 rem. For reference, backgroundradiation at sea level is about 300 mrem or 3 mSv per year.Besides WW II aircraft instruments with radium paint on the dials (by theway, just because they don't glow in the dark does not mean they do nothave radium paint or are non-radioactive - the phosphor mixed with theradium usually breaks down over time, but the radium itself is still there)and most WW II aircraft sextants, other surplus can be radioactive. Someaerospace stuff used thoriated magnesium (improved the structuralproperties) - including parts of the Apollo spacecraft. Gas lamp mantlesused thorium as well. I think the meters on the classic R-390A receiver hadradium - tipped pointers. I understood that some Nixie tubes (at least theUS- made ones) included a small tube of a radioactive gas to lower theionization threshold. I see a small tube in the base of some of the tubes,but my radiation survey meters do not show any radiation getting out of thetube.Oh, and you can turn your cell phone (if it has a camera in it) into aradiation detector:https://hackaday.com/2012/01/15/turn-your-camera-phone-into-a-geiger-counter/I showed this to my health physics guys and they said it would certainlywork, but they would not use it for any critical dose measurement stuff.But to see if something is radioactive? Yep - it should work (note: I havenot tried it).Steve H.On Mon, Aug 23, 2021 at 2:14 PM <Zentronics42@gmail.com> wrote:> Also with detectors that at TOO sensitive there are some tubes that> measure "hot" just from the tube its self. They used uranium in the seals> of the glass envelope. However these tubes tended to be on the larger side> of things. Not what I would call signal or amplification tubes. These were> more RF transmitter final tubes. Not a real danger they measure about as> hot as a thoriated welding rod. Enough to set off a more sensitive counter.> But never a bad Idea to check scopes that have been used in atomic> research. I remember reading some where that Tek was one of the few> companies that had to create a " Official decontamination procedure" for> units that were exposed but they needed to be used again. 1 Ghz scopes> would fall in this category I am sure due to cost to acquire.>> Zen>> -----Original Message-----> From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of Jim Ford> Sent: Monday, August 23, 2021 11:47 AM> To: TekScopes@groups.io> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 7103 found at auction in NM>> Yes, I have to wonder how different radiation detectors work.  I'd assume> they cover different wavelength/frequency/particle energy bands, however> one is inclined to look at it.  One size does not fit all, no doubt.> Somebody more knowledgeable will need to reply.>> Thanks.>> Jim Ford in Southern California, where (some of) the solar radiation is> being blocked by clouds at the moment.>> ------ Original Message ------> From: "Roy Thistle" <roy.thistle@mail.utoronto.ca>> To: TekScopes@groups.io> Sent: 8/23/2021 12:35:28 PM> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 7103 found at auction in NM>> >On Sun, Aug 22, 2021 at 03:08 PM, WA2VNV George wrote:> >> >>> >>  You should check that scope with a radiation detector.> >>> >Hi WA2VNV:> >What type of radiation detector, and why? ( IMO... because I can get a> >GM tube, and it might be radioactive, doesn't seem a good answer?)> >> >--> >Roy Thistle> >> >> >> >> >>>>>>>>>>> >>>


Dave Seiter
 

Some neon lamps also have/had radioactive material added to ensure that the lamp will light at the strike voltage regardless of the amount of ambient light.
-Dave
---------------------
I understood that some Nixie tubes (at least the
US- made ones) included a small tube of a radioactive gas to lower the
ionization threshold.


greenboxmaven
 

Voltage regulator or reference tubes also contained radioactive materials.  0A2,0D3, 5651, and others were regulated in the Air Force as to how many could be in one place and what to do if one was broken. As for sensitivety to light, there were some musical instruments in the 1950s and 60s that used neon relaxation oscillators as synchronized frequency dividers. If the compartment with the neon bulbs was opened for troubleshooting or tuning, it had to be done in very subdued lighting.

   Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 8/23/21 22:17, Dave Seiter wrote:
Some neon lamps also have/had radioactive material added to ensure that the lamp will light at the strike voltage regardless of the amount of ambient light.
-Dave
---------------------
I understood that some Nixie tubes (at least the
US- made ones) included a small tube of a radioactive gas to lower the
ionization threshold.




Dave Wise
 

A notorious case in HP land is the ZZ1000 tube used in early production of the 141T spectrum analyzer mainframe power supply. Its atmosphere was doped with Krypton-85 to speed up ignition. It’s well past its ~10y half-life now, and the tube is slow to start. Meanwhile the supply rails overshoot and at best trigger a fuse-blowing crowbar; at worst they burn out plugins.
I perfected Ed Breya’s suggestion of replacing it with a TL431 plus excess-voltage-absorbing zener.

Dave Wise

From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of greenboxmaven via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, August 24, 2021 6:59 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 7103 found at auction in NM

Voltage regulator or reference tubes also contained radioactive
materials. 0A2,0D3, 5651, and others were regulated in the Air Force as
to how many could be in one place and what to do if one was broken. As
for sensitivety to light, there were some musical instruments in the
1950s and 60s that used neon relaxation oscillators as synchronized
frequency dividers. If the compartment with the neon bulbs was opened
for troubleshooting or tuning, it had to be done in very subdued lighting.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY







On 8/23/21 22:17, Dave Seiter wrote:
Some neon lamps also have/had radioactive material added to ensure that the lamp will light at the strike voltage regardless of the amount of ambient light.
-Dave
---------------------
I understood that some Nixie tubes (at least the
US- made ones) included a small tube of a radioactive gas to lower the
ionization threshold.





Roy Thistle
 

Hi George:
I read your message.
Well... if your mad at me... why?
The scopes were "hot" and you were at Brookhaven: and likely got NRC training.
Given that... a natural question is... what radionuclide(s) containing particulates were the scopes contaminated with? (Or, was it neutron activation?)
If it isn't known what the exposure was, and the dose... saying the scopes were "hot" ... IMO... isn't saying anything meaningful.
There is a lot of nonsense, and fear generated, around the mentioning of radiation.
People ought to ask about it.
Perhaps... since your job was working with radiation... if you get a chance... you'd like to explain.

--
Roy Thistle


ChrisBeee
 

Jeff,

I got one of these plug-ins (very rare over here in Germany) a while ago. It's an Ino-tech 5200 Multichannel Scaler / Integrator and it is intended to live in a 5000 series scope. One modification in particular, necessary to make it work, is 'ambitious' to say the least! There are a couple of unused pins in the upper area of the plug-in edge connector and the plug-in asks for 220VAC because it has its own transformer. Obviously, the 5000 series power supplies did not have enough oomph to feed this plug-in. Bet what you need to do? Route mains AC from the primary AC windings to these contacts (I have created the album 'Ino-tech 5200 plug-in for 5000 series scopes', see the twisted yellow wires going to the right plug-in edge connector in one of the pictures). Don't want to know if you insert whatever 5000-series plug-in that has these contacts used in a different way...Very scary! I have fixed the plug-in to the frame and put a sticker on it in case someone else screws around with this apparatus once I'm six feet under.
Found the necessary wiring to feed the horizontal section, but still could not figure out how to connect the vertical amp. Either there was additional circuitry necessary or a modification in the scope directly to bring it to life. Dunno...

BTW: if anybody is in the possession of an Ino-tech 5200 schematic: I would be very grateful if I could obtain an (electronic) copy!

Chris

On Mon, Aug 23, 2021 at 10:35 PM, Jeff Kruth wrote:


Hi Steve!Yep, third party folks bought 5000 series scopes and made
multichannel analyzers (MCA's) out of them for energy spectrum. I have a
couple in the back room. They have died and I dont want to troubleshoot early
'70's uP units.... Jeff Kruth In a message dated 8/23/2021 3:47:55 PM
Eastern Standard Time, sonodocsch@gmail.com writes:
I wonder if Tek or a third-party manufacturer ever made a plug-in
for one of the Tek scopes that would turn it into a gamma spectrometer. I
know some nuclear medicine systems had Tek displays with custom electronics
that did this.


nonIonizing EMF
 

Dave, or anyone else with experience with the TL431 VR tube replacement designs, which Kick Start or other version is you perfected design?

I haven't studied tube designs much and have no hands on experience. However, seems like great info to know for the 141 and possible others I might find in the future.

Reads like this link has the design iterations: https://groups.io/g/HP-Agilent-Keysight-equipment/photo/68333/2?p=Name,,,20,1,0,0

Figured I'd ask for future reference.

James

On Tue, Aug 24, 2021 at 07:46 AM, Dave Wise wrote:


I perfected Ed Breya’s suggestion of replacing it with a TL431 plus
excess-voltage-absorbing zener.