Topics

Tek 475A transformer replacement


Jim Hall
 

Hello. I am new to this group, but am very interested in the discussions. As a hobby, I have restored some Tek 465 and 475 scopes. My latest 475A has a bad low voltage transformer. It plows the main fuse even when all of the secondary windings are disconnected. To replace it, I need a pin removal tool (Tek 003-0707-00), but have been unable to locate one. I would appreciate any suggestions where I can acquire one. Thanks.


aldue
 

Hi Jim, I have some pin removal tools that work on various Molex style
connectors. They amount to a thin tube that slides over the pin which
disengages the exterior spurs plus, a piston plunger to eject the pin.
The pin diameter needs to be near the tools size.
I shall send a photo in a few minutes. They require more muscle than you
expect however, they work neatly with a bit of persistence. Wish you
success with the project, Gary

On Thu, Jun 4, 2020, 5:55 AM <jim.hall@...> wrote:

Hello. I am new to this group, but am very interested in the discussions.
As a hobby, I have restored some Tek 465 and 475 scopes. My latest 475A has
a bad low voltage transformer. It plows the main fuse even when all of the
secondary windings are disconnected. To replace it, I need a pin removal
tool (Tek 003-0707-00), but have been unable to locate one. I would
appreciate any suggestions where I can acquire one. Thanks.




aldue
 

Hi Jim, I sent photos but, attachments are disallowed. Most are made by
AMP. You may find them at Newark Electronics. The look a bit like a syringe
with a tube instead of a needle.
They punch pins out of plastic blocks. If this is similar to your Tektronix
connector, try to measure the diameter of the holes molded into the
plastic blocks. Send me the data and I shall check for the correct tool.
Ebay has the cheap tool kits but, I haven't been able to make them work.,
aldue = Gary

On Thu, Jun 4, 2020, 5:55 AM <jim.hall@...> wrote:

Hello. I am new to this group, but am very interested in the discussions.
As a hobby, I have restored some Tek 465 and 475 scopes. My latest 475A has
a bad low voltage transformer. It plows the main fuse even when all of the
secondary windings are disconnected. To replace it, I need a pin removal
tool (Tek 003-0707-00), but have been unable to locate one. I would
appreciate any suggestions where I can acquire one. Thanks.




Chuck Harris
 

It all becomes easier if you first push the wire
in the direction of insertion.

I have successfully made removal tools using tin snips,
a tin can, pliers, and a nail around which to roll the
tin can material.

Form a tube that is the same size as the plastic shell's
opening, insert the tube, at the same time push the wire
towards the tube. When the tube passes the connector's
retaining fingers, pull the wire out of the shell.

-Chuck Harris

aldue wrote:

Hi Jim, I have some pin removal tools that work on various Molex style
connectors. They amount to a thin tube that slides over the pin which
disengages the exterior spurs plus, a piston plunger to eject the pin.
The pin diameter needs to be near the tools size.
I shall send a photo in a few minutes. They require more muscle than you
expect however, they work neatly with a bit of persistence. Wish you
success with the project, Gary

On Thu, Jun 4, 2020, 5:55 AM <jim.hall@...> wrote:

Hello. I am new to this group, but am very interested in the discussions.
As a hobby, I have restored some Tek 465 and 475 scopes. My latest 475A has
a bad low voltage transformer. It plows the main fuse even when all of the


Ed Breya
 

If you have any junk telescopic antennas around, they are a handy source of assorted hard brass tubing sizes. Look for a section about the right diameter, and cut a piece and file an end square. I've always managed to find a piece the right size for any connector pin removal. It's good to also wind up a handle at the cold end out of many layers of tape, to get enough axial force and torque without gouging your hand.

I also use them to make rotary punches for making holes in thin, soft materials, by putting a cutting edge on the tip - just spin a drill bit (larger than the tube OD) in the end until the outer edge is nice and sharp. To punch a hole just push and twist it through. It can also be chucked in a drill. These wear out fast, so need to be resharpened as needed. They can make nice clean holes, especially in rubbery type materials, much better than a drill bit.

Ed


Harvey White
 

If you don't have any spare antennas, and the neighbors' cars don't have any either, then a good hobby shop has brass and aluminum stock, perhaps steel as well, of various fractional inch sizes.

Harvey

On 6/4/2020 12:39 PM, Ed Breya via groups.io wrote:
If you have any junk telescopic antennas around, they are a handy source of assorted hard brass tubing sizes. Look for a section about the right diameter, and cut a piece and file an end square. I've always managed to find a piece the right size for any connector pin removal. It's good to also wind up a handle at the cold end out of many layers of tape, to get enough axial force and torque without gouging your hand.

I also use them to make rotary punches for making holes in thin, soft materials, by putting a cutting edge on the tip - just spin a drill bit (larger than the tube OD) in the end until the outer edge is nice and sharp. To punch a hole just push and twist it through. It can also be chucked in a drill. These wear out fast, so need to be resharpened as needed. They can make nice clean holes, especially in rubbery type materials, much better than a drill bit.

Ed



WB6GHK
 

Hi,

Here's a possible pin removal tool solution:

https://www.amazon.com/s?k=pin+removal+tool&ref=nb_sb_noss_1

You're most welcome!


Daveolla
 

Greetings, on pin removal tools, I have a box full of old telescopic TV and radio antennas collected over the years and another box of ones that have been taken apart and cut into various lengths over the years. Perhaps you might have one in just the right diameter to use as a pin remover.

I often use some of these short length ones as punches. If you run the pointed end of an exacto blade (duh, the other end would be the handle) or even the kitchen steak knives into the end of the tubing and scrape, or a deburring action on the edge, it will sharpen up near razor sharp, it should take less than 10 seconds. It will punch great holes in rubber, card, paper etc. Sometimes with thick rubber a bit of lube (spit is usually available) and spin in a drill chuck for better holes without the squishing from punching effect on the holes. You can easily spin and do lovely binder holes in a phone book. Sometimes a small triangular needle file can put some saw teeth on the end of the tube if need be. Ive even used them for banana jacks on occasion, a taper end of a punch or ball bearing easily with a bit of hammering will flare the end, or flare and then flatten for a nice flush end if pushed into a panel hole

The telescopic pins in old watch straps are another source for some handy tubing

You find you will want them right near your bench so you don't have to go far to utilize their handyness.

Dave

At 08:49 AM 6/04/2020, you wrote:
Hi Jim, I have some pin removal tools that work on various Molex style
connectors. They amount to a thin tube that slides over the pin which
disengages the exterior spurs plus, a piston plunger to eject the pin.
The pin diameter needs to be near the tools size.
I shall send a photo in a few minutes. They require more muscle than you
expect however, they work neatly with a bit of persistence. Wish you
success with the project, Gary

On Thu, Jun 4, 2020, 5:55 AM <jim.hall@...> wrote:

Hello. I am new to this group, but am very interested in the discussions.
As a hobby, I have restored some Tek 465 and 475 scopes. My latest 475A has
a bad low voltage transformer. It plows the main fuse even when all of the
secondary windings are disconnected. To replace it, I need a pin removal
tool (Tek 003-0707-00), but have been unable to locate one. I would
appreciate any suggestions where I can acquire one. Thanks.




Jim Hall
 

Many thanks to those who posted useful advise for my search for a pin extractor for the power transformer replacement in a Tek 475A. I had previously purchased a set of extractors on eBay, but had not used enough pressure to free the pins. With the help of a hammer and the correct size extractor, the pins were freed; now to the task of complete reassembly of the scope. I am repairing several 400-series Tek scopes for donation to the Physics Departments at small colleges, since most physics and EE graduates at these colleges have no exposure to use of a scope - a must for many industrial jobs.