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Tek 466 and a noob's lack of experience...


thenrz@...
 

I bought this off of Offerup for $20. I wouldn't have even bothered, but the woman had a lot of good dealings, and I don't feel like she had any reason to lie. The scope among other things were her late husband's. As I have been kick starting my atrophied comp sci brain compartments lately to get back into circuit design with my new desktop CNC that is precise enough to cut some nice tightly pitched boards and a plethora of 3D printers for making whatever else I feel at the time. For the most part, I just want to get myself back to the days of prototyping and beta testing all kinds of electronics for a company I worked for over about eight years.

This Tek seems to be dead. I get a soft green illumination over some of the CRT, but other than that, I cannot make it do anything. There is some semblance of a focused beam when turning on and off the second time. A maybe 1/4" circle shoots in from the left middle and that's all I get to see of anything illuminated beyond the soft glow of about half the screen.

I have nice soldering irons, hot air reworks, a hot air and infrared BGA station, etc. so repair work is something I do a lot of on the side... but as I move into development again, I'm going to need a nice scope along with something I can learn the nitty gritty like with this one...

If this is worth working on, then by all means whatever advice for such an open ended problem would be amazing. If it isn't worth the time/money, *please* let me know so I can more effectively manage my time...

Thanks!


Leanna L Erickson <lle@...>
 

Suggest acquire service manual.
Then check all PS rails for correct voltages.
Probably PS capacitors need replacing.

GL
Keith Wayzata, MN

On Jan 6, 2021, at 9:33 AM, thenrz@gmail.com wrote:

I bought this off of Offerup for $20. I wouldn't have even bothered, but the woman had a lot of good dealings, and I don't feel like she had any reason to lie. The scope among other things were her late husband's. As I have been kick starting my atrophied comp sci brain compartments lately to get back into circuit design with my new desktop CNC that is precise enough to cut some nice tightly pitched boards and a plethora of 3D printers for making whatever else I feel at the time. For the most part, I just want to get myself back to the days of prototyping and beta testing all kinds of electronics for a company I worked for over about eight years.

This Tek seems to be dead. I get a soft green illumination over some of the CRT, but other than that, I cannot make it do anything. There is some semblance of a focused beam when turning on and off the second time. A maybe 1/4" circle shoots in from the left middle and that's all I get to see of anything illuminated beyond the soft glow of about half the screen.

I have nice soldering irons, hot air reworks, a hot air and infrared BGA station, etc. so repair work is something I do a lot of on the side... but as I move into development again, I'm going to need a nice scope along with something I can learn the nitty gritty like with this one...

If this is worth working on, then by all means whatever advice for such an open ended problem would be amazing. If it isn't worth the time/money, *please* let me know so I can more effectively manage my time...

Thanks!





 

The 466 is a very nice, fast-storing analog storage 'scope. It's well worth restoring.

Please make sure that brightness (once you get there) isn't too high. These CRT's are much more sensitive to burn-in (may happen within a few seconds) than regular CRT's. It may be a good idea to defocus the trace by setting the focus pot either completely CW or CCW until you watch the screen and have control over it. The image cannot normally become anywhere near as bright as that of a regular 'scope, like its little brother, the 465.

Also, make sure that you put the 'scope in the non-storage mode for fault finding. In essence, it's very much like a regular 465 plus storage, both technically and in operation.

As Keith said, get yourself a Service Manual. Pay attention to the serial number group your 'scope is in. Get it from Artek Manuals (no affiliation) if you can't get a good copy elsewhere.

I wouldn't be surprised if something simple would be wrong, like one of the PS voltages, because of one or more shorted dipped Tantalum caps. Their most common colors are orange/red in these models.

Do *not* adjust any pots until the 'scope is operating and especially, do not re-adjust the internal storage control pots until the non-storage functions are OK.

Raymond