Topics

T900 photo


donlcramer@...
 

Hi Doug,

There is a photo of a T912 on ebay at:

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1622982027

The style is similar on all the T900 scopes. Blue plastic case, tube to
upper right and controls at left and below. My foggy memory says the T912
was the lowest cost one in the line and was a single channel, therefore I
wonder if the scope pictured is actually a T922. This is a question I bet
Stan could clear up in a heartbeat. I'm getting out on a limb here but I
recollect the T92x was a 20MHz scope and the T935 was the top of the line at
35MHz, dual channel and might have had delayed sweep, too. There was also a
storage scope in the middle there somewhere (10MHz BW?).

T900 was definitely a Beaverton product. Look close and you can see
components similar to the other scopes. After my stint in DSI/portable
scopes, I moved to Tek Labs where I came across both early production and
also some engineering boards for the T935. That was in Bldg 50, so I assume
that the scope line was either designed in 50 or perhaps the eval team which
followed it was in 50. I almost had enough parts scrounged to build one but
with the impatience of youth, I gave them away to another Tek employee. I'm
not sure whether he ever got it all together....

Telequipment was an entity unto themselves as far as the product line was
concerned, not having any connection with Beaverton in design or parts
sourcing. We had a bunch of them at the local community college and they
were ok, but no Tek 500 series, which we also had access to. For trivia
buffs out there, a Telequipment scope features prominently in the cockpit of
the Zero-X spacecraft in Gerry and Sylvia Anderson's "Thunderbirds are Go"
movie, which was British made.

Don


Doug Hale <DougHale@...>
 

Don,
Thanks for the picture and descriptions. This is not the scope I used. The
one I used had the Telequipment name on it. It was horizontally layed out. The
tube was on the left, then the vertical section with the horizontal on the
right, but that was so long ago.
After college I worked as a technician for HP. And we, of coarse, used HP
scopes. Man, I hated those things. These were the 180 series mainframes with
plug-ins. Triggering just was not stable. You had to have one hand on the probe
and one on the trigger knob to see anything. At a following job, I used both Tek
7704s and HP 1740 ???. I'd go to great lengths not to have to use the HP.
That reminds me of a story. At the job mentioned above, in about 1979 I
designed a video lookup table in 10K ecl. It ran at about 17.5 ns. With over 450
ICs on one card, it went though quite a thermal cycle powering up and down. The
prototype PC cards were over-etched and the traces would pull away from the pads
from the thermal cycling. So I'm in the lab with the scope and every 15 minutes
the VP runs in and sayes "how's it goin', when can I ship it?". After a couple
of hours of this, I've gotten maybe a halve an hours work done. He runs into the
lab again and I just stand up and hand him the scope probe and run off to the
rest room. When I come back I get a good couple of hours of uninterrupted work
in and the board is ready to ship.


Doug


donlcramer@cs.com wrote:

Hi Doug,

There is a photo of a T912 on ebay at:

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1622982027

The style is similar on all the T900 scopes. Blue plastic case, tube to
upper right and controls at left and below. My foggy memory says the T912
was the lowest cost one in the line and was a single channel, therefore I
wonder if the scope pictured is actually a T922. This is a question I bet
Stan could clear up in a heartbeat. I'm getting out on a limb here but I
recollect the T92x was a 20MHz scope and the T935 was the top of the line at
35MHz, dual channel and might have had delayed sweep, too. There was also a
storage scope in the middle there somewhere (10MHz BW?).

T900 was definitely a Beaverton product. Look close and you can see
components similar to the other scopes. After my stint in DSI/portable
scopes, I moved to Tek Labs where I came across both early production and
also some engineering boards for the T935. That was in Bldg 50, so I assume
that the scope line was either designed in 50 or perhaps the eval team which
followed it was in 50. I almost had enough parts scrounged to build one but
with the impatience of youth, I gave them away to another Tek employee. I'm
not sure whether he ever got it all together....

Telequipment was an entity unto themselves as far as the product line was
concerned, not having any connection with Beaverton in design or parts
sourcing. We had a bunch of them at the local community college and they
were ok, but no Tek 500 series, which we also had access to. For trivia
buffs out there, a Telequipment scope features prominently in the cockpit of
the Zero-X spacecraft in Gerry and Sylvia Anderson's "Thunderbirds are Go"
movie, which was British made.

Don




To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
TekScopes-unsubscribe@egroups.com



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


dhuster@...
 

Don, that is a T912 in the ebay photo, and it is a dual-channel,
single-timebase, bistable storage scope with a bandwidth of 10MHz.
The T921 was the least-expensive, but didn't didn't sell very well.

Dean