Searching for 2247A Front Foot


Wayne
 

I recently acquired a just-like-new 2247A from a friend that was a long-time Tek employee. It has had very little use, and you cannot tell it from a new one fresh out of the box except for one missing part. The only flaw in the entire scope, cosmetically or functionally, is one of the black polyurethane front feet is missing, 348-0659-00. As far as I have found so far, this part number was used only on the 2245A and 2247A The 2246 parts list shows the foot, but no part number, and the description says "Not replaceable at this time". The part was made by a company called Triquest according to the Tek manual, but a web search indicates they must be out of business.

The "further-down-the-line" 22xx scopes I looked at use a different part number. Wondering if anyone has a 2245A or 2247A parts mule that might be willing to sell me a foot to put this beautiful machine back into absolutely pristine condition.

Thank you!
Wayne


 

Wayne,

Did you ever find a source for the feet? I have a 2245A that also needs one.

Manuel


Wayne
 

Manuel,
Sorry, but no. This beautiful scope is still missing the foot. Perhaps some day I'll look into having one made, but I suspect it will be too costly to make only a few. I'll probably end up finding something close and modifying it to be "just about" like the other ones. If I ever do find or make one, I'll post it on this thread.

Wayne


Harvey White
 

many people with a 3D printer will make their own.

If you do not have a 3D printer, then if there's a makerspace near you, then you can join and print there.

You could buy your own 3D printer, they do have interesting uses.

To design the foot, if you know what it is to look like, you could use OpenSCAD (free).  It is not a "manipulate the graphic on the screen" type of program, it's a "program this shape using the OpenSCAD language" kind of program.  It's a very good program if you can program, or wish to learn to program.  It's a descriptive language, so there's no procedural flow (do this, then do that, then do something else).  It's a language that has you build a shape from primitives such as cube, sphere, cylinder, and so on. I like it because I can program.

However, there are many other ways of designing 3D objects.  Lots of those are free.

You could also check thingiverse.com, and see if https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4726857 manages to look right.

No connection to the designer, never tried it, didn't need one.

Perhaps it might help.

Harvey

On 1/15/2022 10:04 PM, Wayne via groups.io wrote:
Manuel,
Sorry, but no. This beautiful scope is still missing the foot. Perhaps some day I'll look into having one made, but I suspect it will be too costly to make only a few. I'll probably end up finding something close and modifying it to be "just about" like the other ones. If I ever do find or make one, I'll post it on this thread.

Wayne





 

Wayne,

If your in the US send me a PM with your mailing address and I’ll send you the one I have. Mine isn’t a beauty queen and I’ll just put a couple of generic feet on mine.

Manuel


Wayne
 

Harvey,
Thanks for the wealth of info. I don't do 3D printing and have so many other interests/projects, that I have resisted the strong urge to get into it--too old to bring in more interests! Family is already going to kill me after I'm dead when they have to get rid of all this stuff. :-)

Makerspace is a good idea, and there is one nearby, but it looks like Manuel has solved my immediate problem.

Will also check out the link you provided.

Thank You!!


Wayne
 

PM Sent. Thank you, Manuel.


Harvey White
 

You're quite welcome.  I'm trying an enclosure to make an illuminated touch pushbutton (boards assembled are less than 1.00 USD), but it needs (ideally), a combination of transparent and opaque printing to make a proper enclosure.

People do make knobs from them, and I've made PC board support brackets (and a front panel for a TM500).

They can be handy, and investing in one can be useful, but getting to know what it's all about is definitely a good idea at first.

It's additive machining, not subtractive machining.  Makes an interesting difference.

Harvey

On 1/16/2022 10:02 PM, Wayne via groups.io wrote:
Harvey,
Thanks for the wealth of info. I don't do 3D printing and have so many other interests/projects, that I have resisted the strong urge to get into it--too old to bring in more interests! Family is already going to kill me after I'm dead when they have to get rid of all this stuff. :-)

Makerspace is a good idea, and there is one nearby, but it looks like Manuel has solved my immediate problem.

Will also check out the link you provided.

Thank You!!