Topics

Scope Cameras

 

All,

I'm currently playing around with the Scope Hood models that were recently
posted on here (Thanks Michael). I'm starting to think about extending
these to make a modern scope camera, Polaroid film packs being made out of
pure unobtainium.



Has anyone got any experience of different digital cameras that would be
suitable: Electric release, able to extend exposure to max sweep on a 4
channel scope plus data painting, able to reduce exposure to fastest
position, plus any other frills that people can think of that are necessary.
The body would have to be suitable to mount on a hood, or possibly within
one. The lens would have to be able to focus down to a reasonable distance
and have a zoom that was adjustable to frame the screen.



Ideas anyone?



Robin



PS: I'd probably be putting this on a 7000 or a 468.

Mlynch001
 

I have already built a prototype that uses an I-Phone to take pictures. I have not done enough with this to answer most of these questions. The I-Phone does a presentable job. It can be done with some additional work.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR

 

Hadn’t thought of a phone. Was thinking more along the go pro sort of thing. Hmmm, have to think about that

Cheers

Robin

On 15 Mar 2020, at 20:05, Mlynch001 <@mlynch001> wrote:

I have already built a prototype that uses an I-Phone to take pictures. I have not done enough with this to answer most of these questions. The I-Phone does a presentable job. It can be done with some additional work.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


greenboxmaven
 

Polaroid film is not going quietly into the darkness. There are continual requests from photographers to re-open production of the peel apart film packs, there is a single photo single use cartridge for Polaroid pack cameras available from Austria but it costs almost $10.00 per exposure. The dual seperate roll film for the older cameras has not been made for over 25 years, there are also continual requests for it to be produced again. Adapting phones or digital cameras is one possibility, but depending on the speed of the sweep a real photograph is still the best. Analog photography is rebounding in popularity, and Polaroid has been bought out by another company that is making film for some of the cameras. Fuji refused to continue making Polaroid peel-apart packs, the pressure on the new Polaroid company to produce them again is intense. Whether these requests will be considered worthy is unknown. Fuji does make several instant cameras, their Instax series. The cameras are in production and easy to buy, the film packs usually cost about $1.25-2.00 per exposure. The film is very fast, ASA 800, so getting the exposure correct would require filters and alterations to the shutter. New Polaroid cameras and their film packs are easily available and not too expensive, but the same sort of filtering and shutter modifications would be needed. It could be interesting to get home brew photography mavens involved. The good thing about all of this is that scope traces are very bright, so less sensitive photo media could be used.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 3/15/20 3:31 PM, Robin_Birch wrote:
All,

I'm currently playing around with the Scope Hood models that were recently
posted on here (Thanks Michael). I'm starting to think about extending
these to make a modern scope camera, Polaroid film packs being made out of
pure unobtainium.

Ideas anyone?

Robin


PS: I'd probably be putting this on a 7000 or a 468.



Harvey White
 

Haven't done much more than to consider the idea.

However, my experience is with canon EOS products.

Canon EOS stuff is apparently worth *nothing* when a new model comes out (I certainly couldn't get much for a 60D when I bought a 70D).

So any of the older canon models should be a starting point.

I'd be tempted to use a canon 10D (not sure when that's going to happen yet), but it takes a 2.5 mm phone plug to trigger it.  I'd think that some minor electronics slaved to the Tek scope camera electronics (haven't looked at that yet but I'd consider it strongly).   I'd want to consider a 50mm lens with an extender, make sure that it carries the signals with it, and then rework the scope camera back (and lens, sadly, and likely the electronics) to get a decent coverage.  I would not expect the existing lens in the scope camera to work simply because of the distance between the focal plane and the lens.  Since the original camera used a standard shutter and the canons use a focal plane shutter, expect a few differences there.

I'd think that a standard camera with a remote release, a few bits of electronics to control the shutter, and a lens extension tube might just get the job done.  IF you can do this with a phone, or a point and shoot, that's good.  Haven't played with that although I could.  An advantage of the DSLR is that if you can dig live video out of them, then you have a way of getting straight video off the scope screen into a monitor.

Just ideas, though.

Harvey

On 3/15/2020 3:31 PM, Robin_Birch wrote:
All,

I'm currently playing around with the Scope Hood models that were recently
posted on here (Thanks Michael). I'm starting to think about extending
these to make a modern scope camera, Polaroid film packs being made out of
pure unobtainium.


Has anyone got any experience of different digital cameras that would be
suitable: Electric release, able to extend exposure to max sweep on a 4
channel scope plus data painting, able to reduce exposure to fastest
position, plus any other frills that people can think of that are necessary.
The body would have to be suitable to mount on a hood, or possibly within
one. The lens would have to be able to focus down to a reasonable distance
and have a zoom that was adjustable to frame the screen.


Ideas anyone?


Robin


PS: I'd probably be putting this on a 7000 or a 468.



John Williams
 

I have a Tektronix video camera that mounts directly on the crt the same as the Tek still Polaroid cameras. There was a camera for sale on eBay a while back, all that is required is a “brick” to supply power to the camera. I believe Dennis Tillman made a still camera mount for this purpose.

Brian
 

Hi , for a scope camera I use the C1001/C1002 cameras along with a CORTEX PCX200 frame grabber , it can also provide the 12v for the camera , the s/w for that may still be on their website .This camera is a video camera and the frame grabber allows getting a 'still' from the data stream . The frame grabber can be triggered much like a still camera and this is ok as long as the sweep rate is not fast .I pursued the Polaroid film path to be told by the new producers of the film that the production tools for the type 107 and the 665 film packs had not been saved after production ceased and they were not able to produce anything as a result , and may never as it would mean starting from scratch .

Brian

On Sunday, 15 March 2020, 23:21:34 GMT, John Williams <books4you@...> wrote:

I have a Tektronix video camera that mounts directly on the crt the same as the Tek still Polaroid cameras. There was a camera for sale on eBay a while back, all that is required is a “brick” to supply power to the camera. I believe Dennis Tillman made a still camera mount for this purpose.

Chuck Harris
 

The nice thing about the C1001/C1002 cameras is you
can sub out the original camera for something good.

Which you may as well, as the frame grabber cards
were all long obsolete ISA cards, that were separated
from the cameras when their PC's got scrapped.

-Chuck Harris

Brian via Groups.Io wrote:

Hi , for a scope camera I use the C1001/C1002 cameras along with a CORTEX PCX200 frame grabber , it can also provide the 12v for the camera , the s/w for that may still be on their website .This camera is a video camera and the frame grabber allows getting a 'still' from the data stream . The frame grabber can be triggered much like a still camera and this is ok as long as the sweep rate is not fast .I pursued the Polaroid film path to be told by the new producers of the film that the production tools for the type 107 and the 665 film packs had not been saved after production ceased and they were not able to produce anything as a result , and may never as it would mean starting from scratch .

Brian

Ed Breya
 

I think I've mentioned before, that I've rigged up old C-5 scope camera carcasses with "modern" USB webcams and such, over the years. You just have to delete the original Polaroid camera back and lens, and figure a way to mount a new video camera head in its place. In more recent times, I prefer to use cell phone cameras instead.

I have some C-5s that I had planned to make into holders for cell phones, such that the optics land in the right place and focus point. With the right mechanical arrangement, it can be set up so the phone just rests on a shelf type thing that aligns it, and blocks out background light reflections from the screen. I haven't built any yet, but in the meantime, I have had decent results - enough to get the message across - with totally open freehand screen shots on a phone camera. The trick is to take plenty of shots from slightly different positions and lighting, then sort them out to find an acceptable one. Some may be defective due to timing issues between the scope trace and camera scanning rates, leaving blank spots and other distortions, but with enough shots, it isn't too hard to find a good one. This does not work with single-sweep traces though, unless maybe the camera can be set up for it somehow.

Ed

Glydeck
 

Here is what I came up with using a C-12 body I picked up cheap.

http://glydeck.blogspot.com/2011/03/motorola-mystery.html

George

On Mar 15, 2020, at 10:02 PM, Ed Breya via Groups.Io <edbreya=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I think I've mentioned before, that I've rigged up old C-5 scope camera carcasses with "modern" USB webcams and such, over the years. You just have to delete the original Polaroid camera back and lens, and figure a way to mount a new video camera head in its place. In more recent times, I prefer to use cell phone cameras instead.

I have some C-5s that I had planned to make into holders for cell phones, such that the optics land in the right place and focus point. With the right mechanical arrangement, it can be set up so the phone just rests on a shelf type thing that aligns it, and blocks out background light reflections from the screen. I haven't built any yet, but in the meantime, I have had decent results - enough to get the message across - with totally open freehand screen shots on a phone camera. The trick is to take plenty of shots from slightly different positions and lighting, then sort them out to find an acceptable one. Some may be defective due to timing issues between the scope trace and camera scanning rates, leaving blank spots and other distortions, but with enough shots, it isn't too hard to find a good one. This does not work with single-sweep traces though, unless maybe the camera can be set up for it somehow.

Ed



Jean-Paul
 

Bonjour Robin:

I had many TEK cameras circa 1980s..1990s and use 7000 series and 2465/7B.

I used my compact Panasonic Lumix LX-5 and LX-7 at fiorst in macro mode.

I took the most basic camera, with the blue plastic housing fitting the 7000 bezel, removed the back and other parts and placed gaffers black tape to mask the rear opening.

The distance for camera to CRT is 4 1/2 ", exactly right to allow a full screen shot in macro mode.

Finally with the advent of great mobile phone sensors and apps, I use iPhone 7, etc.

You must get the intensity and sweep rate adjusted and leave the camer on long shutter, I have ASA+800.

You can see the results if you search my previous posts eg re transient response.

Will post more if asked


Bon Chance,


Jon

Brian
 

Hi , the PCX200 card that I currently use is a PCI card , probably still obsolete but fits in a more up to date pc.The polaroid film I nearly always used was the 665 as it had a negative as well , the 107 was used when I wanted to push the speed to its max for something very fast and likely single shot . The camera being only B/W is no problem as the films used were also .These days I have a TDS744 and hardly ever need the cameras .
Brian

On Monday, 16 March 2020, 02:59:14 GMT, Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

The nice thing about the C1001/C1002 cameras is you
can sub out the original camera for something good.

Which you may as well, as the frame grabber cards
were all long obsolete ISA cards, that were separated
from the cameras when their PC's got scrapped.

-Chuck Harris

Brian via Groups.Io wrote:
  Hi , for a scope camera I use the C1001/C1002 cameras along with a CORTEX PCX200 frame grabber , it can also provide the 12v for the camera , the s/w for that may still be on their website .This camera is a video camera and the frame grabber allows getting a 'still' from the data stream . The frame grabber can be triggered much like a still camera and this is ok as long as the sweep rate is not fast .I pursued the Polaroid film path to be told by the new producers of the film that the production tools for the type 107 and the 665 film packs had not been saved after production ceased and they were not able to produce anything as a result , and may never as it would mean starting from scratch .

Brian