Relabelling push buttons on Tek 7603


Roy Kalawsky
 

Final job - can anyone recommend a good way to relabel faded/missing labels on push buttons? Many thanks Roy


Dave Peterson
 

I experimented with decals on a set of ruined 465 push buttons. I'd say the results are somewhere between great, and needs a little more work.

Getting the size right is quite a challenge. I think I got the font size correct in Word, but there appears to have been some shrinkage of the decal after printing. There are several other production details that I think need addressing:

Scale the font up 1pt (7 to 8) to accommodate for the shrinkage caused either by the clear coat or the decal wetting and setting solutions.

More coats of clear sealer needed. I used two. Should be 3 or 4. Some decals began to smudge, meaning the clear coat wasn't 100%.
My printed array of button texts should be more widely separated and marked with a cut line that results in a decal that covers the full face of the button. Otherwise the decal edges show.


If I'm remembering correctly, I think the scope used in this photo album is the one with the decals. Note the bleached white buttons: https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=264779

I can share some details of my experience if interested.

Dave

On Friday, September 24, 2021, 12:08:27 AM PDT, Roy Kalawsky <r.s.kalawsky@lboro.ac.uk> wrote:

Final job - can anyone recommend a good way to relabel faded/missing labels on push buttons? Many thanks Roy


Roy Kalawsky
 

Hi Dave

Further details would be appreciated. Did you use laser or ink jet water slide paper.

I’m not sure how thick the decal is at the edges having never used this stuff. Alternatively I could use dymo labels.

Cheers Roy


lawrence reiss
 

Hi Dave,The labels on your 465 look great!  I'm  very interested in what you did. 
I have an old 465 with worn text on several buttons, as well as a few other issues.I'd be grateful to learn from your experience with this...Thanks, 
Lawrence


Paul Amaranth
 

I once used a toner transfer method to relable a button on a 468.

Use your favorite graphics program to get an image of what the
label should be like. If you end up using 6pt fonts, you will
probably be able to find a font that's close enough.

Reverse the image and print it on toner transfer media. I used
PnP blue, but you could also use the slick side of some label
backing paper.

Heat transfer it onto the button (after it's been cleaned and
the old label removed).

If it's good (or good enough), spray it with a protective
fixative, then a couple of coats of lacquer.

If not, clean it off and repeat until good.

The details are in the technique, but you can get pretty good
results.

Using actual decal paper might be easier but I always worried about
the edge of the decal coming up, toner transfer makes it look like
it was printed right on the button.

Paul

On Fri, Sep 24, 2021 at 01:51:57AM -0700, Roy Kalawsky wrote:
Hi Dave

Further details would be appreciated. Did you use laser or ink jet water slide paper.

I’m not sure how thick the decal is at the edges having never used this stuff. Alternatively I could use dymo labels.

Cheers Roy







!DSPAM:614d91b412151954911623!
--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Manchester MI, USA
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC | Security, Systems & Software
paul@AuroraGrp.Com | Unix/Linux - We don't do windows


Dave Peterson
 

All,

I'll need to find the thread that was going here about the font of the buttons. It is Univers and is available in Word. There are variations in weight of the font in different locations. If I'm remembering correctly I used 7pt - several test prints on regular paper resulted in a good match. I'm away from home right now so don't have access to the Word doc. I'd upload it, but I'm not happy with it for reasons I mentioned earlier.

The thread was "Push button font" - https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/message/174803

The reason I'd change my method to cut the decals to the size and shape of the button face is that the edges are somewhat apparent. But I'm using scale modeling decal fixing solvents - Micro Sol and Micro Set. These "melt" the decal into place. Actually soften the decal carrier so that it sets into the fine details of the plastic. It softens the edges and makes them less apparent. Making them coincident with the button edge does a good job of making them disappear. In practice, I think it's also causing the decal to shrink slightly though.

Paul,
I don't know what the toner transfer method is. Could you provide some references you think are good descriptions? Sounds like this method might be easier than decals. Decals were quite a pain.

Dave

On Friday, September 24, 2021, 07:54:16 AM PDT, Paul Amaranth <paul@auroragrp.com> wrote:

I once used a toner transfer method to relable a button on a 468.

Use your favorite graphics program to get an image of what the
label should be like.  If you end up using 6pt fonts, you will
probably be able to find a font that's close enough.

Reverse the image and print it on toner transfer media.  I used
PnP blue, but you could also use the slick side of some label
backing paper.

Heat transfer it onto the button (after it's been cleaned and
the old label removed).

If it's good (or good enough), spray it with a protective
fixative, then a couple of coats of lacquer.

If not, clean it off and repeat until good.

The details are in the technique, but you can get pretty good
results.

Using actual decal paper might be easier but I always worried about
the edge of the decal coming up, toner transfer makes it look like
it was printed right on the button.

  Paul

On Fri, Sep 24, 2021 at 01:51:57AM -0700, Roy Kalawsky wrote:
Hi Dave

Further details would be appreciated. Did you use laser or ink jet water slide paper.

I’m not sure how thick the decal is at the edges having never used this stuff. Alternatively I could use dymo labels.

Cheers Roy







!DSPAM:614d91b412151954911623!
--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH            | Manchester MI, USA             
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC  |  Security, Systems & Software
paul@AuroraGrp.Com              |  Unix/Linux - We don't do windows


toby@...
 

On 2021-09-24 10:54 a.m., Paul Amaranth wrote:
I once used a toner transfer method to relable a button on a 468.

Use your favorite graphics program to get an image of what the
label should be like. If you end up using 6pt fonts, you will
probably be able to find a font that's close enough.
The actual font is Univers Condensed fwiw.

--T


...

Paul

On Fri, Sep 24, 2021 at 01:51:57AM -0700, Roy Kalawsky wrote:
Hi Dave

Further details would be appreciated. Did you use laser or ink jet water slide paper.

I’m not sure how thick the decal is at the edges having never used this stuff. Alternatively I could use dymo labels.

Cheers Roy







!DSPAM:614d91b412151954911623!


Paul Amaranth
 

On Fri, Sep 24, 2021 at 04:47:49PM +0000, Dave Peterson via groups.io wrote:

Paul,
I don't know what the toner transfer method is. Could you provide some references you think are good descriptions? Sounds like this method might be easier than decals. Decals were quite a pain.

Dave
A common method of DIY PCB construction. You use a laser printer to print an image of the board traces on
a transfer sheet, then iron it onto the board. The toner transfers to the board and acts as a resist when
you etch it.

However, the toner is black so it can also be used to replace labels. I've use the method a few times to
replace graphics on metal surfaces and that button. It's a bit fragile though so it's needs protection.

I'm not sure I'd call it easier. Decals would be easier to position properly.

Google "toner transfer pcb" and you should get a billion or so hits :-)

There's another process out there that allows you to make your own dry
transfer labels. At the time I was looking at that (a number of years
ago), there was one kit available, it was expensive, and it didn't work
well at all. Now I see that you can get dry transfer decal sheets for your
ink jet as well as laser printers and they look much more effective. I
think I would look at this route if I had to do it today.

Paul

--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Manchester MI, USA
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC | Security, Systems & Software
paul@AuroraGrp.Com | Unix/Linux - We don't do windows


Dave Seiter
 

I've used print-on waterslide paper for quite a few projects, and the only drawback I've come across is the thick edge.  All (or most of) the decals in model kits are tapered so that the edges are almost invisible, but you can't get that from a sheet of water slide paper.  A small decal on the end of a small push button will only accentuate the problem.  Lots of lacquer, I guess!
-Dave

On Friday, September 24, 2021, 07:54:18 AM PDT, Paul Amaranth <paul@auroragrp.com> wrote:

I once used a toner transfer method to relable a button on a 468.

Use your favorite graphics program to get an image of what the
label should be like.  If you end up using 6pt fonts, you will
probably be able to find a font that's close enough.

Reverse the image and print it on toner transfer media.  I used
PnP blue, but you could also use the slick side of some label
backing paper.

Heat transfer it onto the button (after it's been cleaned and
the old label removed).

If it's good (or good enough), spray it with a protective
fixative, then a couple of coats of lacquer.

If not, clean it off and repeat until good.

The details are in the technique, but you can get pretty good
results.

Using actual decal paper might be easier but I always worried about
the edge of the decal coming up, toner transfer makes it look like
it was printed right on the button.

  Paul

On Fri, Sep 24, 2021 at 01:51:57AM -0700, Roy Kalawsky wrote:
Hi Dave

Further details would be appreciated. Did you use laser or ink jet water slide paper.

I’m not sure how thick the decal is at the edges having never used this stuff. Alternatively I could use dymo labels.

Cheers Roy







!DSPAM:614d91b412151954911623!
--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH            | Manchester MI, USA             
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC  |  Security, Systems & Software
paul@AuroraGrp.Com              |  Unix/Linux - We don't do windows