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Real Colors on 7000 Series Modules and Mainframes.

Egge Siert
 

Hi to All,

We all know the influence of sunlight on the red lettering and knobs of Modules. A spectrum of dark red to orange or even yellowish brown is sometimes the endresult. But I think the other colors are also vulnerable for much sunlight. During the years I saw several 7000 Modules with deep green and gray colors on their Timebases. Recently a "New" 7104 was sold on eBay and its 7B15 Timebase is a good example of this. I have several NOS 7000 Series Modules, but none of them has this deep colors. Does anybody know more of this?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tektronix-7104-Oscilloscope-Microchannel-Plate-CRT-034-New-034-With-Manual-/153818472955?nma=true&si=ZvGiEAfQU3k53Iauo1AI3OO36oY%253D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557


Greetings,

Egge Siert

Dave Seiter
 

I can't add anything except that I thought those colors were too deep, but since the "tek" logo is blue, it's a later model.  My 7B15s are all pretty washed out, and my later 7104s are as well.  In fact, all the units in my office now seem really washed out, even though the sun never shines directly in, and the metal blinds are usually closed.  Besides sunlight, I wonder if the dyes were effected by fluorescent light as well.
-Dave

On Monday, February 24, 2020, 09:49:17 AM PST, Egge Siert <eggeja2@...> wrote:

Hi to All,

We all know the influence of sunlight on the red lettering and knobs of Modules. A spectrum of dark red to orange or even yellowish brown is sometimes the endresult. But I think the other colors are also vulnerable for much sunlight. During the years I saw several 7000 Modules with deep green and gray colors on their Timebases. Recently a "New" 7104 was sold on eBay and its 7B15 Timebase is a good example of this. I have several NOS 7000 Series Modules, but none of them has this deep colors. Does anybody know more of this?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tektronix-7104-Oscilloscope-Microchannel-Plate-CRT-034-New-034-With-Manual-/153818472955?nma=true&si=ZvGiEAfQU3k53Iauo1AI3OO36oY%253D&orig_cvip=true&nordt=true&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2557


Greetings,

Egge Siert

stevenhorii
 

I have a number of 7000-series plug-ins of varying ages. The intensity of the colors (silk screened? anodized?) definitely varies, but not always "oldest are most faded". I suspect it has to do with light exposure has been noted. This is particularly noticeable on the "paired plug-ins" that sit next to each other in the mainframe. If the plug-ins were from different sources, I have seen the color highlighted areas that cross over between the two plug-ins do not match in intensity though they are clearly the same color. Even the gray that crosses over between plug-ins (e.g., the 7L5 and Options 32 and 33) can vary in intensity. Because the areas are gray, the shades of gray appear different between the two plug-ins.

stevenhorii
 

Dave,

Since fluorescent lamps use mercury vapor to generate UV which then excites the phosphor lining the tube, they do produce some UV output as the phosphor absorbs and converts most of it. The IV output is quite low, but museums and other places that use fluorescent lamps and display artwork or documents often install UV filters around the tubes to block almost all of what UV gets through the phosphor.

Chuck Harris
 

Fluorescent lamps are mercury vapor lamps, and mercury vapor, when
ionized, emits predominantly blue and ultraviolet. The phosphors
that coat the tube turn this high energy UV into visible light, but
at only about 30% efficiency, as I recall.

Ordinary window glass, and the flint glass in the fluorescent lamp
bulb's envelope are almost opaque to UV, so they stop most of it,
but not even close to all.

Before I replaced the 7" circuline fluorescent bulb in my magnifier
lamp with LED, I used to get sunburn on my hands from all of the work
I did close to the fluorescent bulb. I could feel the backs of my
hands tingle from the UV.

-Chuck Harris

Dave Seiter wrote:

I can't add anything except that I thought those colors were too deep, but since the "tek" logo is blue, it's a later model.  My 7B15s are all pretty washed out, and my later 7104s are as well.  In fact, all the units in my office now seem really washed out, even though the sun never shines directly in, and the metal blinds are usually closed.  Besides sunlight, I wonder if the dyes were effected by fluorescent light as well.
-Dave