P6065 probe


David Austerman
 

Anybody have a reasonably priced p6065 for sale that hasn't been run over by a train? The ones on eBay are a fortune and look like total crap. I don't think the 465s are too picky on input pF for the low freqs I would occasionally use it for, but would like an original one that was designated for it, unless the "collector's pricing" are all that's available out there. thx dave


Edward Prest
 

I bought Chinese ones when I restored my scope. They compensate fine. It seems there is only one big manufacturer and a million people selling the same thing. At the price they ask you can buy 2 or 3 sets for the price of used tek and have spares.


 

David,

You can also use the P6062/A/B and the P6105/A with the 465. Both have readout indicator pins, so they will properly light the range indicators on the VOLTS/DIV dials (if that matters to you). Both are more common on eBay than the P6065, and can be had for more reasonable prices (i.e. less than $30 US).

I've been very happy with my cheap Chinese probes that I bought on Amazon, with the caveat that they lack readout indicator pins. They are half the price of all but the cheapest Tek probes on eBay, seem to work quite well (contrary to some stories I've read on the web), and come with a nice selection of accessories. Some people don't like the switchable probes, and I have tripped myself up with them several times, but for the price I can't complain.

-- Jeff Dutky


 

On Thu, Sep 23, 2021 at 12:51 AM, Jeff Dutky wrote:


You can also use the P6062/A/B and the P6105/A with the 465. Both have readout
indicator pins, so they will properly light the range indicators on the
VOLTS/DIV dials (if that matters to you).
The P6105 is a fixed 10X probe with readout pin. The P6062 is a bit exceptional: Not only does it have a 1X/10X switch on the probe body, it also has a wire running to the BNC readout pin, controlling the resistor value. So, on 'scopes like the 465, the switch on the probe body also changes the light on the voltage scale. Unfortunately, the wire runs along the outside of the probe's coax screen, inside the plastic and is broken or shorted on almost all samples.

Raymond


 

Raymond Domp Frank wrote:

the [readout indicator] wire runs along the outside of the [P6062] probe's coax screen, inside the plastic and
is broken or shorted on almost all samples.
I appear to have been very lucky with the single sample I bought, then. I've thought about getting a couple more P6062s, to use with my 76xx scopes, since it's the one place where a switchable probe with readout indicator pin is actually functional, but maybe I should not press my luck.

-- Jeff Dutky


David Austerman
 

Thanks Edward. I have a few Chinese probes that work well. I was just thinking an original might be cool!


David Austerman
 

Thanks for the great insight on the 6062 and 6105. I really didn't know much about the pins and how they actually worked. I am going to include those into my searches. I really just need a 10x, but if a 6062 comes over the horizon, I will probably grab one of those. I'm glad I posted and received this info!


Harvey White
 

Tektronix probes either have a readout or not.  A scope that has a ring around the BNC connector is generally equippe3d with  a readout system.  The readout can be as simple as a light illuminating a number on a transparent ring around the (typically) vertical sensitivity knob, to a 5000 or 7000 series CRT readout.

If the probe is equipped with a readout, there is a pin to contact the ring on the scope's BNC.  Inside the probes BNC connector, there is a resistor to ground.  If you have such a scope, then put a resistor substitution box between that  ring and ground, vary the resistance, and watch the readout for any particular setting.  The range of the readout will change with respect to the vertical attenuation position.  You won't (generally) get a readout outside a particular range on a per plugin basis.       There were threads on this list about probes and resistors, but this is how it works.  Note that the same reading may be caused by two different resistances.

1.0 volt/s div may go to 10.0/div, 100.0/div, 1000 volts/div.

Note that with a probe that has a standard BNC without a pin, it'll all be in your head.


Harvey

On 9/22/2021 9:42 PM, David Austerman wrote:
Thanks for the great insight on the 6062 and 6105. I really didn't know much about the pins and how they actually worked. I am going to include those into my searches. I really just need a 10x, but if a 6062 comes over the horizon, I will probably grab one of those. I'm glad I posted and received this info!





Albert Otten
 

On Thu, Sep 23, 2021 at 03:42 AM, David Austerman wrote:
Thanks for the great insight on the 6062 and 6105.
Note that these probes (but not the 6105A) have compensation range up to 47 pF. Useful with some low frequency plugins, like the 7A22, and with some of the older scope types. (But beware that the pin is not damaged on a non-readout BNC connector.)
Albert


David Austerman
 

Thanks again to all for the information. This is how I learn! 73,dave