OT IEEE Spectrum article cipher machine spy case


Jean-Paul
 

Hello all: My IEEE Spectrum article about a 1963 cipher machine and a huge espionage case Rubicon just went online

https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-scandalous-history-of-the-last-rotor-cipher-machine

about a yers work. Last photo has some HP and TEK equipment.

Your thoughts appreciated!


Jon


Miguel Work
 

After a career as an electrical engineer and inventor, author Jon D. Paul now researches, writes, and lectures on the history of digital technology, especially encryption. In the 1970s he began collecting vintage electronic instruments, such as the Tektronix oscilloscopes and Hewlett-Packard spectrum analyzers seen here


John Griessen
 

On 8/31/21 15:05, Jean-Paul wrote:
Hello all: My IEEE Spectrum article about a 1963 cipher machine and a huge espionage case Rubicon just went online
https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-scandalous-history-of-the-last-rotor-cipher-machine
Merci pour cette article ecrit si bien M. Jon.

John


Clark Foley
 

Formidable!
I have long fascinated by rotor encryption and the carelessness that can lead to discovering the key. I read that one such key for Enigma during WW2 was an easy to remember code that was not changed often enough. It was A. Hitler’s birthday! Maybe its not true but it made for a good lesson in password protection.
I also learned of NSAs backdoor requirement and that it was illegal for USA manufacturers to create encryption that the NSA could not access. It came to third hand when a mathematician acquaintance created encryption for HBO satellite transmission. A company trying to transition from black government projects got the commercial job to encrypt HBO transmission. They did such a good job that the NSA stopped deployment when they realized the level of sophistication was a lot more than just inverting the vertical synch of the video.


Vince Vielhaber
 

Very interesting article, Jean-Paul.

Vince.

On 08/31/2021 05:05 PM, Jean-Paul wrote:
Hello all: My IEEE Spectrum article about a 1963 cipher machine and a huge espionage case Rubicon just went online

https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-scandalous-history-of-the-last-rotor-cipher-machine

about a yers work. Last photo has some HP and TEK equipment.

Your thoughts appreciated!


Jon



--
Michigan VHF Corporation -- nobucks dot net
K8ZW - http://www.hamradio.fun


teamlarryohio
 

Excellent article on what must have been a fun and rewarding project.
Thanks!
-ls-


 

Thank you Jean-Paul. I enjoyed the article immensely. Electro-mechanical systems are endlessly fascinating, and that must have a very entertaining restoration project.

— Jeff Dutky


Roy Thistle
 

On Tue, Aug 31, 2021 at 02:05 PM, Jean-Paul wrote:


Your thoughts appreciated!
Well... it looks like he's got a row (at least 5) of 2467Bs... all with the cases removed. (The cases are under the bench?)
He doesn't look very happy.
Maybe mostly analog doesn't make a mostly digital engineer happy.
But doesn't he portray the quintessential collector?

--
Roy Thistle


 

Roy,

Only three of those are 2467s or 2467Bs, the other two must be 2465As or 2465Bs. The 2467s have a wider bezel around the screen.

-- Jeff Dutky


Jean-Paul
 

Roy and Jeff:

Many thanks for the notes, I had all the 246x opened up for CAL and repair years ago.
Ran into deep issues on #5, a 2465B CTT/GPIB/WR with PSU and other problems.

With the IEEE article and travel, other projects, these five scopes occupied one bench all these years! Yes the covers, shields and cases are under the bench.
In the background you can see the HP spec analyzer, also 4195A, and TEK TM500 CAL sets.
This is one of 4 benches i have setup. Originally one for power electronics, one for audio, one for mechanical work and a bench for measurements, eg inductance, LCR, HyPot, 30 kV insulation....

The IEEE pro photographer photo shoot lasted nine hours, and the lab shot at the end of a very long day.
Super Pro photographer Peter Adams shot 100s over about 2 hours for this ONE shot! and I was very tired.
I was not thrilled with the setup or view of the lab, but the session was controlled by Peter and the IEEE.

Anyway glad you liked the article!

Bon Soiree,

Jon


Clark Foley
 

I was following a thread for passive/cavity transmitters a la the Great Seal Bug (a.k.a. The Thing) and found a web site with a very good summary of covert gadgets and cipher machines. I was tickled by the Mattel Barbie(TM) toy typewriter that includes a simple encryption feature, hidden of course, for the enjoyment of the more curious 5 year old.

https://www.cryptomuseum.com/crypto/index.htm


saipan59 (Pete)
 

On Thu, Sep 9, 2021 at 12:54 PM, Clark Foley wrote:


I was following a thread for passive/cavity transmitters a la the Great Seal
Bug (a.k.a. The Thing) and found a web site with a very good summary of covert
gadgets and cipher machines. I was tickled by the Mattel Barbie(TM) toy
typewriter that includes a simple encryption feature, hidden of course, for
the enjoyment of the more curious 5 year old.
https://www.cryptomuseum.com/crypto/index.htm
I'm acquainted with Paul and Marc that run CryptoMuseum - they have likely the best site around for clandestine-related electronics and crypto gear - great photos, detailed description and history.
Also in The Netherlands is Louis Meulstee, who has an awesome amount of data on clandestine radios (and other military radios, especially British). For example, see the pages here, where there are over 300 descriptions for download, starting on this page: http://www.wftw.nl/supplement%20part1.html .
I contributed to the original "Volume 4" book described here: http://www.wftw.nl/volumes.html .
My own site is becoming a bit obsolete these days, but still has some details not found on other sites:
http://militaryradio.com/spyradio/

Pete