[OT] Datasheet for NC7033 or NCR7033 NVRAM needed.


David Slipper
 

Sorry for the OT but I'm getting desperate - it's supposed to be a standard early NVRAM but it and it's data-sheet seem to be unobtanium.

Regards,
Dave


Tom Lee
 

Early yes, standard not so much.

The 7033 is an MNOS (sic) EAROM. The underlying enabling principle was discovered when Gordon Moore punked the entire industry into chasing nitride gates as the solution to MOS's notorious threshold shift problem. Nitrides turned out to be even more unstable then sodium-contaminated oxide (Intel had already pissed away big bucks finding that out; Moore helped everyone else experience the pain). That instability was exploited to make EAROMs, but they could never really stabilize the instability, if you get my meaning. These devices could not tolerate many write cycles. Their primary use was as channel memories in TVs and cable boxes, where reprogramming was a very rare event.

The datasheet is the last appendix of the following: http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/gtc/970005-001_GTC_SW10_Maintenance_Manual_198205.pdf

Hope this helps. Good luck!

-- Cheers,
Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 7/19/2021 16:48, David Slipper wrote:
Sorry for the OT but I'm getting desperate - it's supposed to be a standard early NVRAM but it and it's data-sheet seem to be unobtanium.

Regards,
Dave






Tom Lee
 

Aargh. "more unstable than", not "more unstable then", of course!

Aargh. Ptth.

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 7/19/2021 17:23, Tom Lee wrote:
Early yes, standard not so much.

The 7033 is an MNOS (sic) EAROM. The underlying enabling principle was discovered when Gordon Moore punked the entire industry into chasing nitride gates as the solution to MOS's notorious threshold shift problem. Nitrides turned out to be even more unstable then sodium-contaminated oxide (Intel had already pissed away big bucks finding that out; Moore helped everyone else experience the pain). That instability was exploited to make EAROMs, but they could never really stabilize the instability, if you get my meaning. These devices could not tolerate many write cycles. Their primary use was as channel memories in TVs and cable boxes, where reprogramming was a very rare event.

The datasheet is the last appendix of the following: http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/gtc/970005-001_GTC_SW10_Maintenance_Manual_198205.pdf

Hope this helps. Good luck!

-- Cheers,
Tom


Jim Ford
 

Yeah, Tom, I remember reading about Gordon Moore or somebody else at Intel meeting with a gentleman from another semiconductor house and revealing the sodium issue in exchange for the solution to another vexing process problem.  I don't remember the details, but the story was hilarious!  Laugh out loud funny!  Maybe you know the details?       Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> Date: 7/19/21 5:23 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] [OT] Datasheet for NC7033 or NCR7033 NVRAM needed. Early yes, standard not so much.The 7033 is an MNOS (sic) EAROM. The underlying enabling principle was discovered when Gordon Moore punked the entire industry into chasing nitride gates as the solution to MOS's notorious threshold shift problem. Nitrides turned out to be even more unstable then sodium-contaminated oxide (Intel had already pissed away big bucks finding that out; Moore helped everyone else experience the pain). That instability was exploited to make EAROMs, but they could never really stabilize the instability, if you get my meaning. These devices could not tolerate many write cycles. Their primary use was as channel memories in TVs and cable boxes, where reprogramming was a very rare event.The datasheet is the last appendix of the following: http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/gtc/970005-001_GTC_SW10_Maintenance_Manual_198205.pdfHope this helps. Good luck!-- Cheers,Tom-- Prof. Thomas H. LeeAllen Ctr., Rm. 205350 Jane Stanford WayStanford UniversityStanford, CA 94305-4070http://www-smirc.stanford.eduOn 7/19/2021 16:48, David Slipper wrote:> Sorry for the OT but I'm getting desperate - it's supposed to be a > standard early NVRAM but it and it's data-sheet seem to be unobtanium.>> Regards,> Dave>>>>> >>


Tom Lee
 

The story I'd heard was that Intel learned that silicon nitride is excellent at gettering or otherwise blocking sodium. They pissed away a fortune trying to make a good gate insulator out of the stuff, but threshold stability was even worse than for the oxide they were trying to replace. That Intel was experimenting with nitride was not a well-kept secret, and Moore was asked at a conference about it. His reply was "We found pretty much what we expected." Interpreting that as "nitride is good", AMD and others immediately ramped up their research into nitrides, pissed away fortunes, then angrily approached Moore at yet another conference about his earlier statement. His reply was, "Engineers always expect disappointment, and so we found pretty much what we expected."

-- Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 7/19/2021 18:19, Jim Ford wrote:
Yeah, Tom, I remember reading about Gordon Moore or somebody else at Intel meeting with a gentleman from another semiconductor house and revealing the sodium issue in exchange for the solution to another vexing process problem.  I don't remember the details, but the story was hilarious!  Laugh out loud funny!  Maybe you know the details?       Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> Date: 7/19/21 5:23 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] [OT] Datasheet for NC7033 or NCR7033 NVRAM needed. Early yes, standard not so much.The 7033 is an MNOS (sic) EAROM. The underlying enabling principle was discovered when Gordon Moore punked the entire industry into chasing nitride gates as the solution to MOS's notorious threshold shift problem. Nitrides turned out to be even more unstable then sodium-contaminated oxide (Intel had already pissed away big bucks finding that out; Moore helped everyone else experience the pain). That instability was exploited to make EAROMs, but they could never really stabilize the instability, if you get my meaning. These devices could not tolerate many write cycles. Their primary use was as channel memories in TVs and cable boxes, where reprogramming was a very rare event.The datasheet is the last appendix of the following: http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/gtc/970005-001_GTC_SW10_Maintenance_Manual_198205.pdfHope this helps. Good luck!-- Cheers,Tom-- Prof. Thomas H. LeeAllen Ctr., Rm. 205350 Jane Stanford WayStanford UniversityStanford, CA 94305-4070http://www-smirc.stanford.eduOn 7/19/2021 16:48, David Slipper wrote:> Sorry for the OT but I'm getting desperate - it's supposed to be a > standard early NVRAM but it and it's data-sheet seem to be unobtanium.>> Regards,> Dave>>>>> >>



David Slipper
 

Many thanks!!!

I am often amazed by the expertise and help available on the web.

Thanks again,

Dave

On 20/07/2021 01:23, Tom Lee wrote:
Early yes, standard not so much.

The 7033 is an MNOS (sic) EAROM. The underlying enabling principle was
discovered when Gordon Moore punked the entire industry into chasing
nitride gates as the solution to MOS's notorious threshold shift
problem. Nitrides turned out to be even more unstable then
sodium-contaminated oxide (Intel had already pissed away big bucks
finding that out; Moore helped everyone else experience the pain). That
instability was exploited to make EAROMs, but they could never really
stabilize the instability, if you get my meaning. These devices could
not tolerate many write cycles. Their primary use was as channel
memories in TVs and cable boxes, where reprogramming was a very rare event.

The datasheet is the last appendix of the following:
http://www.bitsavers.org/pdf/gtc/970005-001_GTC_SW10_Maintenance_Manual_198205.pdf

Hope this helps. Good luck!

-- Cheers,
Tom