Topics

New member intro


Joel B Walker
 

Hello all. My name is Joel B Walker. I have been interested in electronics all my life having grown up in my father's shop. I am a self employed repair tech, working on anything electronic plus any type of automotive mechanical repair. Also light machine shop and welding tasks.
My interest in Tektronix began just out of high school in the early 80's. Duke University Recycle and Sales was in it's heyday then and I bought my first Tektronix scope. It was a Type 555 with 21a and 22a timebases. It was on a scope mobile and had two Type B's in it. I learned about "real" oscilloscopes on that fine instrument. Now I have over 100 Tektronix items in my possession. I can list them if you want me to. I'm looking forward to a lot of good reading and conversation on here. I noticed an actual "Professor" replied to my crystal question. That is humbling. I am certainly not nearly as educated as most probably are on here. Everything I know about electronics I learned from my father or on my own. Thanks for allowing me to be here.


Tom Lee
 

Welcome to the group, Joel. The 555 is a beaut, isn't it? A real scope indeed! I think it probably served as set-dressing in more than one sci-fi movie from the 60s.

I'm sure you'll have fun here!

--Cheers,
Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 1/24/2021 18:00, Joel B Walker wrote:
Hello all. My name is Joel B Walker. I have been interested in electronics all my life having grown up in my father's shop. I am a self employed repair tech, working on anything electronic plus any type of automotive mechanical repair. Also light machine shop and welding tasks.
My interest in Tektronix began just out of high school in the early 80's. Duke University Recycle and Sales was in it's heyday then and I bought my first Tektronix scope. It was a Type 555 with 21a and 22a timebases. It was on a scope mobile and had two Type B's in it. I learned about "real" oscilloscopes on that fine instrument. Now I have over 100 Tektronix items in my possession. I can list them if you want me to. I'm looking forward to a lot of good reading and conversation on here. I noticed an actual "Professor" replied to my crystal question. That is humbling. I am certainly not nearly as educated as most probably are on here. Everything I know about electronics I learned from my father or on my own. Thanks for allowing me to be here.




snapdiode
 

He writes an entertaining textbook as well, take a look

http://www-smirc.stanford.edu/papers/chapter1.pdf

Worth a read even if you don't like electronics!


Gary Robert Bosworth
 

For 60 years, I only heard the name Tunnel Diode. It was only last year
that I heard the name Snap Diode for the first time. Where did this name
Snap come from???

On Sun, Jan 24, 2021, 18:27 Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:

Welcome to the group, Joel. The 555 is a beaut, isn't it? A real scope
indeed! I think it probably served as set-dressing in more than one
sci-fi movie from the 60s.

I'm sure you'll have fun here!

--Cheers,
Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 1/24/2021 18:00, Joel B Walker wrote:
Hello all. My name is Joel B Walker. I have been interested in
electronics all my life having grown up in my father's shop. I am a self
employed repair tech, working on anything electronic plus any type of
automotive mechanical repair. Also light machine shop and welding tasks.
My interest in Tektronix began just out of high school in the early
80's. Duke University Recycle and Sales was in it's heyday then and I
bought my first Tektronix scope. It was a Type 555 with 21a and 22a
timebases. It was on a scope mobile and had two Type B's in it. I learned
about "real" oscilloscopes on that fine instrument. Now I have over 100
Tektronix items in my possession. I can list them if you want me to. I'm
looking forward to a lot of good reading and conversation on here. I
noticed an actual "Professor" replied to my crystal question. That is
humbling. I am certainly not nearly as educated as most probably are on
here. Everything I know about electronics I learned from my father or on my
own. Thanks for allowing me to be here.










snapdiode
 

It snaps from conducting to non-conducting veeeeeery quickly. Also called a step-recovery diode.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Step_recovery_diode


Gary Robert Bosworth
 

I have used Tunnel Diodes since 1958. I still wonder who came up with the
name "snap"?

On Sun, Jan 24, 2021, 19:03 snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

It snaps from conducting to non-conducting veeeeeery quickly. Also called
a step-recovery diode.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Step_recovery_diode






Tom Lee
 

There was a bit of a naming competition within HP, and with the larger EE community. HP wanted to name it in honor of the discoverer, Frank Boff, but it didn't catch on (but I know several HP folks who still refer to it as a Boff diode). Since the diode phenomenon he discovered has a delayed, but superfast, turn-off, "snap-off" or the shorter "snap" diode seemed like a good descriptive name. As to who was the first to utter the word "snap" in this connection, I have no idea. But I imagine that many engineers probably uttered it around the same time. There aren't that many different ways that engineers would likely use to describe the fast transition from on to off.

I looked briefly through a few papers from that period, but I didn't find anything that would permit me to make a definite attribution.

-- Cheers,
Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 1/24/2021 19:07, Gary Robert Bosworth wrote:
I have used Tunnel Diodes since 1958. I still wonder who came up with the
name "snap"?

On Sun, Jan 24, 2021, 19:03 snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

It snaps from conducting to non-conducting veeeeeery quickly. Also called
a step-recovery diode.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Step_recovery_diode







Gary Robert Bosworth
 

"snap" is a better name than "tunnel". Noone remembers Esaki anyway.

On Sun, Jan 24, 2021, 19:33 Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:

There was a bit of a naming competition within HP, and with the larger
EE community. HP wanted to name it in honor of the discoverer, Frank
Boff, but it didn't catch on (but I know several HP folks who still
refer to it as a Boff diode). Since the diode phenomenon he discovered
has a delayed, but superfast, turn-off, "snap-off" or the shorter "snap"
diode seemed like a good descriptive name. As to who was the first to
utter the word "snap" in this connection, I have no idea. But I imagine
that many engineers probably uttered it around the same time. There
aren't that many different ways that engineers would likely use to
describe the fast transition from on to off.

I looked briefly through a few papers from that period, but I didn't
find anything that would permit me to make a definite attribution.

-- Cheers,
Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 1/24/2021 19:07, Gary Robert Bosworth wrote:
I have used Tunnel Diodes since 1958. I still wonder who came up with the
name "snap"?

On Sun, Jan 24, 2021, 19:03 snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

It snaps from conducting to non-conducting veeeeeery quickly. Also
called
a step-recovery diode.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Step_recovery_diode













Tom Lee
 

Yes, although they're two different types of diodes.

When Esaki won the Nobel for his discovery, his boss from that time was asked to comment. "Can you describe for a non-technical audience what the tunnel diode is good for?" The answer he gave was "Nothing."

Classic moment in live TV. Had he interviewed some trigger circuit designers at Tek, the reporter would have gotten a different answer.

-- Cheers,
Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 1/24/2021 19:37, Gary Robert Bosworth wrote:
"snap" is a better name than "tunnel". Noone remembers Esaki anyway.

On Sun, Jan 24, 2021, 19:33 Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:

There was a bit of a naming competition within HP, and with the larger
EE community. HP wanted to name it in honor of the discoverer, Frank
Boff, but it didn't catch on (but I know several HP folks who still
refer to it as a Boff diode). Since the diode phenomenon he discovered
has a delayed, but superfast, turn-off, "snap-off" or the shorter "snap"
diode seemed like a good descriptive name. As to who was the first to
utter the word "snap" in this connection, I have no idea. But I imagine
that many engineers probably uttered it around the same time. There
aren't that many different ways that engineers would likely use to
describe the fast transition from on to off.

I looked briefly through a few papers from that period, but I didn't
find anything that would permit me to make a definite attribution.

-- Cheers,
Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 1/24/2021 19:07, Gary Robert Bosworth wrote:
I have used Tunnel Diodes since 1958. I still wonder who came up with the
name "snap"?

On Sun, Jan 24, 2021, 19:03 snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

It snaps from conducting to non-conducting veeeeeery quickly. Also
called
a step-recovery diode.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Step_recovery_diode












Jim Ford
 

Welcome, Joel!  Some of the best engineers I've worked with in the past 30+ years didn't have degrees, so no worries.   Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Joel B Walker <joelandjoyce@esinc.net> Date: 1/24/21 6:00 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: [TekScopes] New member intro Hello all. My name is Joel B Walker. I have been interested in electronics all my life having grown up in my father's shop. I am a self employed repair tech, working on anything electronic plus any type of automotive mechanical repair. Also light machine shop and welding tasks. My interest in Tektronix began just out of high school in the early 80's. Duke University Recycle and Sales was in it's heyday then and I bought my first Tektronix scope. It was a Type 555 with 21a and 22a timebases. It was on a scope mobile and had two Type B's in it. I learned about "real" oscilloscopes on that fine instrument. Now I have over 100 Tektronix items in my possession. I can list them if you want me to. I'm looking forward to a lot of good reading and conversation on here. I noticed an actual "Professor" replied to my crystal question. That is humbling. I am certainly not nearly as educated as most probably are on here. Everything I know about electronics I learned from my father or on my own. Thanks for allowing me to be here.


Jim Ford
 

Yes, not the same as the tunnel or Esaki diode (after it's inventor Leo Esaki).   Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: "snapdiode via groups.io" <snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io> Date: 1/24/21 7:03 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] New member intro It snaps from conducting to non-conducting veeeeeery quickly. Also called a step-recovery diode.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Step_recovery_diode


Dave Seiter
 

Thanks for mentioning the book, looks like a fun read!  (I drove past Stanford today and realized I haven't been on campus in about 10 years)
-Dave

On Sunday, January 24, 2021, 06:50:36 PM PST, snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

He writes an entertaining textbook as well, take a look

http://www-smirc.stanford.edu/papers/chapter1.pdf

Worth a read even if you don't like electronics!