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looking for internal photos of Input RC Normalizer (067-0537-00)


Jared Cabot
 

Does anyone here have an Input RC Normalizer to hand they can open the lid and take some happy snaps for me?

I'm dealing with a seller who sent me a gutted unit with a crystal in place of the proper components and I need to prove what it is supposed to look like inside as the manual doesn't show the actual compoments in the exploded diagram....

Thanks in advance!
Jared


 

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 09:45 AM, Jared Cabot wrote:


Does anyone here have an Input RC Normalizer to hand they can open the lid and
take some happy snaps for me
OK, find it here: www.hakanh.com/dl/temp/537.jpg

/Håkan


Colin Herbert
 

Further to Håkan's kind provision of this photo, apart from the fixed capacitor and (1M0) resistor in parallel, the other side of the Normalizer has an adjustable trimmer capacitor. If this is present, removal of the white plastic cap on the opposite side (if present) should reveal the screwdriver slot for its adjustment. If you cannot see a screwdriver slot, then the trimmer is absent. Don't fiddle with the trimmer if it is present, check out the instructions for the use and (possible) adjustment of Normalizers on TekWiki.

While I note that this particular Normalizer is 15pF, all normalizers look pretty much the same inside. The differences being the value of the capacitance(s) and the words on the cover. I think all the resistors are 1M0.

There are a number of different models with differing capacitances; some common, some less so. I received a "modified" Normalizer a little while ago (it had been converted into an attenuator for some reason!) and the supplier replaced it free of charge and with no argument. The peculiarity here is that Normalizers for 47pF, 30pf, 24pf and 20 pf are relatively common, but the odd values such as 15pf and 22pF seem to be butchered by some people. Why would anyone want to modify an unusual Normalizer and not a more common one?

Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of zenith5106
Sent: 07 August 2020 11:31
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] looking for internal photos of Input RC Normalizer (067-0537-00)

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 09:45 AM, Jared Cabot wrote:


Does anyone here have an Input RC Normalizer to hand they can open the lid and
take some happy snaps for me
OK, find it here: www.hakanh.com/dl/temp/537.jpg

/Håkan


Jared Cabot
 

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 07:58 PM, Colin Herbert wrote:


Further to Håkan's kind provision of this photo, apart from the fixed
capacitor and (1M0) resistor in parallel, the other side of the Normalizer has
an adjustable trimmer capacitor. If this is present, removal of the white
plastic cap on the opposite side (if present) should reveal the screwdriver
slot for its adjustment. If you cannot see a screwdriver slot, then the
trimmer is absent. Don't fiddle with the trimmer if it is present, check out
the instructions for the use and (possible) adjustment of Normalizers on
TekWiki.

While I note that this particular Normalizer is 15pF, all normalizers look
pretty much the same inside. The differences being the value of the
capacitance(s) and the words on the cover. I think all the resistors are 1M0.

There are a number of different models with differing capacitances; some
common, some less so. I received a "modified" Normalizer a little while ago
(it had been converted into an attenuator for some reason!) and the supplier
replaced it free of charge and with no argument. The peculiarity here is that
Normalizers for 47pF, 30pf, 24pf and 20 pf are relatively common, but the odd
values such as 15pf and 22pF seem to be butchered by some people. Why would
anyone want to modify an unusual Normalizer and not a more common one?

Colin.
Yeah, I have read through the manual and even made my own version too ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1fHyzJifiQ ).
The 15pF version is used on the 2445 and 2467 scopes I have here, one day I'll amass more as needs arise. Although, they are a pretty easy thing to DIY.

I have no idea why a standard metal-can crystal would have been connected between the input and output BNC's in mine.....


On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 07:30 PM, zenith5106 wrote:


www.hakanh.com/dl/temp/537.jpg
Perfect, exactly what I was looking for.

Much thanks! :)


Greg Muir
 

With respect to modifying an item of this type I suspect that whomever does it has no need for the intended function and, instead looks at the usefulness of the enclosure. If the more-or-less nonstandard value normalizers seem to be more prey to modification, it is unknown as to why except for the possibility that a large number of them may have been dumped by a large user (military?) and then they were found on the surplus market by others.

When one looks at the price for a comparable Pomona Electronics box complete with BNC connectors attached and the $40 price tag, some old item that they found (probably in their junk box) looks pretty attractive cost-wise. And this type of thing is not only found for a Tek product. I have seen many other manufacturers products built in similar enclosures (especially the Pomona products) apparently being repurposed for the immediate need of the user.

Greg