Good storage solution for collection of 500-series plugins?


Jonathan Pyle
 

I currently have four plugins for my RM45A (545A), which means three of my plugins are always lying around somewhere collecting dust.

It would be great if there was a bookshelf or rack where I could store plugins when I wasn't using them, where they would be enclosed on five sides and thus protected from dust and other dangers.

Does anyone have a good solution for storing 500-series plugins? I was hoping for something inexpensive rather than a vintage scope cart that would cost a lot to ship. Maybe someone has found an Ikea-ish organizer that happens to have compartments that are the perfect size for 500 series plugins?


-
 

I store my plugins in one of the silver colored ziplock anti static bags
and then inside of a steel cabinet that has a drop down front door. The
cabinet is in a somewhat air conditioned room in an outbuilding. I've
never had a problem with the books, manuals, machine tools, wood, fabrics
or any of the electronics in there. I don't know that the cabinet was
originally made for but it's about 15 inches tall and has a single shelf so
isn't fitted for plugins but I stack then two of three high with no
problems ( I lay them on their sides just for stability.) Any decently
constructed enclosed steel storage cabinet with adjustable shelfs from Home
Depot or the like should work fine for storing them. But I do recommend
keeping them in antistatic bags just to keep any dust off and help prevent
ESD when handling them. Since they are electronic, I would avoid any
plastic storge containers or cabinets unless they're made of antistatic
material since plastics can generate static electricity. Depending on how
dry and/or cold your climate is, then that could be BIG problem or almost
insignificant in a hot, humid place like Florida.

On Sat, Apr 24, 2021 at 12:35 PM Jonathan Pyle <jhpyle@gmail.com> wrote:

I currently have four plugins for my RM45A (545A), which means three of my
plugins are always lying around somewhere collecting dust.

It would be great if there was a bookshelf or rack where I could store
plugins when I wasn't using them, where they would be enclosed on five
sides and thus protected from dust and other dangers.

Does anyone have a good solution for storing 500-series plugins? I was
hoping for something inexpensive rather than a vintage scope cart that
would cost a lot to ship. Maybe someone has found an Ikea-ish organizer
that happens to have compartments that are the perfect size for 500 series
plugins?






-
 

I went looking for a picture of a cabinet like mine but then realized
that a steel file cabinet would work fine for what you want. They're
available in single, double and four or five drawer models and you can get
them at any office supply store.

On Sat, Apr 24, 2021 at 3:30 PM It's me! <rrrr6789@gmail.com> wrote:

I store my plugins in one of the silver colored ziplock anti static bags
and then inside of a steel cabinet that has a drop down front door. The
cabinet is in a somewhat air conditioned room in an outbuilding. I've
never had a problem with the books, manuals, machine tools, wood, fabrics
or any of the electronics in there. I don't know that the cabinet was
originally made for but it's about 15 inches tall and has a single shelf so
isn't fitted for plugins but I stack then two of three high with no
problems ( I lay them on their sides just for stability.) Any decently
constructed enclosed steel storage cabinet with adjustable shelfs from Home
Depot or the like should work fine for storing them. But I do recommend
keeping them in antistatic bags just to keep any dust off and help prevent
ESD when handling them. Since they are electronic, I would avoid any
plastic storge containers or cabinets unless they're made of antistatic
material since plastics can generate static electricity. Depending on how
dry and/or cold your climate is, then that could be BIG problem or almost
insignificant in a hot, humid place like Florida.

On Sat, Apr 24, 2021 at 12:35 PM Jonathan Pyle <jhpyle@gmail.com> wrote:

I currently have four plugins for my RM45A (545A), which means three of
my plugins are always lying around somewhere collecting dust.

It would be great if there was a bookshelf or rack where I could store
plugins when I wasn't using them, where they would be enclosed on five
sides and thus protected from dust and other dangers.

Does anyone have a good solution for storing 500-series plugins? I was
hoping for something inexpensive rather than a vintage scope cart that
would cost a lot to ship. Maybe someone has found an Ikea-ish organizer
that happens to have compartments that are the perfect size for 500 series
plugins?






Renée
 

I do not know what it is but ( in general) things stored in steel cabinets and "cookie tins" seem to last a lot longer and without corrosion issues. I think it is due to the steel grabbing the reactive components in the air faster than the items stored, there is generally more surface area of the container to react......I do know my tea is stored in "tins" and lasts for years with little degradation due to oxidation. I believe it is the same reason.
Renée

On 4/24/21 12:30 PM, - wrote:
I store my plugins in one of the silver colored ziplock anti static bags
and then inside of a steel cabinet that has a drop down front door. The
cabinet is in a somewhat air conditioned room in an outbuilding. I've
never had a problem with the books, manuals, machine tools, wood, fabrics
or any of the electronics in there. I don't know that the cabinet was
originally made for but it's about 15 inches tall and has a single shelf so
isn't fitted for plugins but I stack then two of three high with no
problems ( I lay them on their sides just for stability.) Any decently
constructed enclosed steel storage cabinet with adjustable shelfs from Home
Depot or the like should work fine for storing them. But I do recommend
keeping them in antistatic bags just to keep any dust off and help prevent
ESD when handling them. Since they are electronic, I would avoid any
plastic storge containers or cabinets unless they're made of antistatic
material since plastics can generate static electricity. Depending on how
dry and/or cold your climate is, then that could be BIG problem or almost
insignificant in a hot, humid place like Florida.

On Sat, Apr 24, 2021 at 12:35 PM Jonathan Pyle <jhpyle@gmail.com> wrote:

I currently have four plugins for my RM45A (545A), which means three of my
plugins are always lying around somewhere collecting dust.

It would be great if there was a bookshelf or rack where I could store
plugins when I wasn't using them, where they would be enclosed on five
sides and thus protected from dust and other dangers.

Does anyone have a good solution for storing 500-series plugins? I was
hoping for something inexpensive rather than a vintage scope cart that
would cost a lot to ship. Maybe someone has found an Ikea-ish organizer
that happens to have compartments that are the perfect size for 500 series
plugins?







Roy Thistle
 

On Sat, Apr 24, 2021 at 12:30 PM, - wrote:


I store my plugins in one of the silver colored ziplock anti static bags
If one is going to do that, either displace the air with dry nitrogen gas... which I assume everyone has... or put in a new (or properly salvaged) desiccant bag.
Here in the colonies, the military always seems to put them in.
If you don't... unless you live in the Mojave Desert.. you might regret it.

--
Roy Thistle


-
 

I agree that it's a good idea but unless it's something that I'm going
to leave for a LONG time I seldom bother and I've never had a problem. I've
stored Tek and other electronics for five plus years in silver bags and all
of it has been fine. I have ammo that has been stored in ammo cans without
desiccant since I reloaded it in the 1960s and it still looks and shoots
like new. In fact, I even have some WW-II US made MIL ammo that still looks
and shoots fine. This is in Florida heat and humidity. As long as
everything is DRY when I seal it, nothing that I've sealed up seems to
deteriorate. But a word of caution, regular ziploc bags are just about
worthless except for keeping the dust off. Moisture passes right through
them.

On Sun, Apr 25, 2021 at 1:43 PM Roy Thistle <roy.thistle@mail.utoronto.ca>
wrote:

On Sat, Apr 24, 2021 at 12:30 PM, - wrote:


I store my plugins in one of the silver colored ziplock anti static bags
If one is going to do that, either displace the air with dry nitrogen
gas... which I assume everyone has... or put in a new (or properly
salvaged) desiccant bag.
Here in the colonies, the military always seems to put them in.
If you don't... unless you live in the Mojave Desert.. you might regret it.

--
Roy Thistle