Topics

Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew


Jeff Kruth
 

While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes add enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap jewelers screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using friction fit, tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small hammer. This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the screw may give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern Standard Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes: 
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive but if someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive anymore.

Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of that size. You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27 so you get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.


Joseph Orgnero
 

In my experience Tek uses only Torx screws on their equipment, trying to use Allen or Bristol wrenches is asking for trouble.
Jose Orgnero VE7LBI

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Kruth via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 11:56 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes add enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap jewelers screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using friction fit, tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small hammer. This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the screw may give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern Standard Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive but if someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive anymore.

Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of that size. You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27 so you get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.












--
Jose Orgnero


Miguel Work
 

Hi Jose, these knob in the 576 is a allen screw in "

-----Mensaje original-----
De: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] En nombre de Joseph Orgnero
Enviado el: lunes, 1 de febrero de 2021 21:29
Para: TekScopes@groups.io
Asunto: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

In my experience Tek uses only Torx screws on their equipment, trying to use Allen or Bristol wrenches is asking for trouble.
Jose Orgnero VE7LBI

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Kruth via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 11:56 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes add enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap jewelers screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using friction fit, tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small hammer.
This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the screw may give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern Standard Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive but if someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive anymore.

Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of that size.
You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27 so you get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.












--
Jose Orgnero







Scanned by McAfee and confirmed virus-free.
Find out more here: https://bit.ly/2zCJMrO


Joseph Orgnero
 

I take it back then, but I never had a 576 : (

-----Original Message-----
From: Miguel Work
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 12:41 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

Hi Jose, these knob in the 576 is a allen screw in "

-----Mensaje original-----
De: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] En nombre de Joseph Orgnero
Enviado el: lunes, 1 de febrero de 2021 21:29
Para: TekScopes@groups.io
Asunto: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

In my experience Tek uses only Torx screws on their equipment, trying to use Allen or Bristol wrenches is asking for trouble.
Jose Orgnero VE7LBI

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Kruth via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 11:56 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes add enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap jewelers screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using friction fit, tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small hammer.
This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the screw may give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern Standard Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive but if someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive anymore.

Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of that size.
You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27 so you get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.












--
Jose Orgnero







Scanned by McAfee and confirmed virus-free.
Find out more here: https://bit.ly/2zCJMrO






--
Jose Orgnero


snapdiode
 

In the 500 series, there are no Torx screws anywhere AFAIK, rather they are Pozidriv.


Michael A. Terrell
 

Torx was developed in 1967 and patented in 1971. Bristol was in use during
WW-II

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 5:33 PM snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

In the 500 series, there are no Torx screws anywhere AFAIK, rather they
are Pozidriv.






greenboxmaven
 

Because there are two grubscrews, remove the good one that did loosen, apply penetrant to the stuck one, both on it and also down the hole of the other one. Find a good high strength bolt about an inch long of the same thread as the good grubscrew, install it, and tighten it sensibly- not too much! Loosen and tighten it several times to "work" the bushing inside the knob. Take it easy, the bushing does flex, and that can help work things loose. I have done this many times with great results. Grub srews have a cone shaped recess on their tip to dig into the shaft. Working that loose is key to getting the screw out.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 2/1/21 19:14, Michael A. Terrell wrote:
Torx was developed in 1967 and patented in 1971. Bristol was in use during
WW-II

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 5:33 PM snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

In the 500 series, there are no Torx screws anywhere AFAIK, rather they
are Pozidriv.








Bob Albert
 

I have been watching this thread and have a related problem.  The main tuning knob on my Kenwood TS-940S cannot be removed, as the set screw has a ruined hole and when I try to turn it, it's frozen.
I don't need to remove it but I'd like to know how.
Bob

On Monday, February 1, 2021, 05:30:04 PM PST, greenboxmaven via groups.io <ka2ivy=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

  Because there are two grubscrews, remove the good one that did loosen,
apply penetrant to the stuck one, both on it and also down the hole of
the other one. Find a good high strength bolt about an inch long of the
same thread as the good grubscrew, install it, and tighten it sensibly-
not too much!  Loosen and tighten it several times to "work" the
bushing inside the knob. Take it easy, the bushing does flex, and that
can help work things loose. I have done this many times with great
results. Grub srews have a cone shaped recess on their tip to dig into
the shaft. Working that loose is key to getting the screw out.

      Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


On 2/1/21 19:14, Michael A. Terrell wrote:
Torx was developed in 1967 and patented in 1971. Bristol was in use during
WW-II

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 5:33 PM snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

In the 500 series, there are no Torx screws anywhere AFAIK, rather they
are Pozidriv.









Dave Seiter
 

I've *never* seen a Tek knob with a torx set screw.-Dave

On Monday, February 1, 2021, 12:29:01 PM PST, Joseph Orgnero <josepho@shaw.ca> wrote:

In my experience Tek uses only Torx screws on their equipment, trying to use
Allen or Bristol wrenches is asking for trouble.
Jose Orgnero VE7LBI

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Kruth via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 11:56 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot
soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes add
enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap jewelers
screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using friction fit,
tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small hammer.
This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the screw may
give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern Standard
Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive but if
someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive anymore.

Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of that size.
You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27 so you
get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.












--
Jose Orgnero


Larry McDavid
 

I've never seen a set screw with a Torx recess.

The other larger screws that look like Phillips are most likely PoziDriv.

There have been lots of good suggestions here on how to remove a tight set screw. Sometimes, when all else fails, you just gotta drill the little buggers out... Left-hand drills can be a big help with all kinds of stuck screws; you must turn them counterclockwise, of course.

Larry

On 2/1/2021 7:19 PM, Dave Seiter wrote:
I've *never* seen a Tek knob with a torx set screw.-Dave
On Monday, February 1, 2021, 12:29:01 PM PST, Joseph Orgnero <josepho@shaw.ca> wrote:
In my experience Tek uses only Torx screws on their equipment, trying to use
Allen or Bristol wrenches is asking for trouble.
Jose Orgnero VE7LBI
-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Kruth via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 11:56 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew
While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot
soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes add
enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap jewelers
screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using friction fit,
tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small hammer.
This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the screw may
give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern Standard
Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive but if
someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive anymore.
Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of that size.
You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27 so you
get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.
--
Best wishes,

Larry McDavid W6FUB
Anaheim, California (SE of Los Angeles, near Disneyland)


Larry McDavid
 

However, I was wrong earlier saying I had not seen a tiny-size Torx. On checking, I actually have a Wiha Torx set from T1 through T10.

So, I wonder if there are small set screws with a Torx recess. Has anyone actually encountered such a set screw?

Larry

On 2/1/2021 7:19 PM, Dave Seiter wrote:
I've *never* seen a Tek knob with a torx set screw.-Dave
On Monday, February 1, 2021, 12:29:01 PM PST, Joseph Orgnero <josepho@shaw.ca> wrote:
In my experience Tek uses only Torx screws on their equipment, trying to use
Allen or Bristol wrenches is asking for trouble.
Jose Orgnero VE7LBI
-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Kruth via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 11:56 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew
While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot
soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes add
enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap jewelers
screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using friction fit,
tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small hammer.
This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the screw may
give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern Standard
Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive but if
someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive anymore.
Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of that size.
You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27 so you
get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.
--
Best wishes,

Larry McDavid W6FUB
Anaheim, California (SE of Los Angeles, near Disneyland)


Tom Lee
 

I've never seen one. That's not the same as declaring that they don't exist, but I feel safe in saying that they certainly are rare, if they exist, in Tek scopes.

Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 2/1/2021 21:30, Larry McDavid wrote:
However, I was wrong earlier saying I had not seen a tiny-size Torx. On checking, I actually have a Wiha Torx set from T1 through T10.

So, I wonder if there are small set screws with a Torx recess. Has anyone actually encountered such a set screw?

Larry

On 2/1/2021 7:19 PM, Dave Seiter wrote:
  I've *never* seen a Tek knob with a torx set screw.-Dave
     On Monday, February 1, 2021, 12:29:01 PM PST, Joseph Orgnero <josepho@shaw.ca> wrote:
    In my experience Tek uses only Torx screws on their equipment, trying to use
Allen or Bristol wrenches is asking for trouble.
Jose Orgnero VE7LBI

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Kruth via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 11:56 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot
soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes add
enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap jewelers
screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using friction fit,
tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small hammer.
This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the screw may
give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern Standard
Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive but if
someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive anymore.

Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of that size.
You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27 so you
get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.












Dave Seiter
 

My left-hand bit set has saved me about 7 times in the past year.  They work amazingly well, but as you say, they don't work in reverse!  Back in the spring, I set up a friend's mishap in my mill to show him how great they work, only to realize that the mill doesn't have a reverse.  I felt pretty stupid, but at least I made the realization before actually trying it!
-Dave

On Monday, February 1, 2021, 09:27:40 PM PST, Larry McDavid <lmcdavid@lmceng.com> wrote:

I've never seen a set screw with a Torx recess.

The other larger screws that look like Phillips are most likely PoziDriv.

There have been lots of good suggestions here on how to remove a tight
set screw. Sometimes, when all else fails, you just gotta drill the
little buggers out... Left-hand drills can be a big help with all kinds
of stuck screws; you must turn them counterclockwise, of course.

Larry


On 2/1/2021 7:19 PM, Dave Seiter wrote:
  I've *never* seen a Tek knob with a torx set screw.-Dave
      On Monday, February 1, 2021, 12:29:01 PM PST, Joseph Orgnero <josepho@shaw.ca> wrote:
 
  In my experience Tek uses only Torx screws on their equipment, trying to use
Allen or Bristol wrenches is asking for trouble.
Jose Orgnero VE7LBI

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Kruth via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 11:56 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot
soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes add
enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap jewelers
screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using friction fit,
tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small hammer.
This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the screw may
give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern Standard
Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive but if
someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive anymore.

Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of that size.
You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27 so you
get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.












--
Best wishes,

Larry McDavid W6FUB
Anaheim, California  (SE of Los Angeles, near Disneyland)


Dave Seiter
 

Are there any Torx in ~pre-1985...1990 Tek products?  I don't think I've ever run across one.  Plenty of Torx in post-2000 consumer stuff.  
-Dave

On Monday, February 1, 2021, 09:35:40 PM PST, Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:

I've never seen one. That's not the same as declaring that they don't
exist, but I feel safe in saying that they certainly are rare, if they
exist, in Tek scopes.

Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 2/1/2021 21:30, Larry McDavid wrote:
However, I was wrong earlier saying I had not seen a tiny-size Torx.
On checking, I actually have a Wiha Torx set from T1 through T10.

So, I wonder if there are small set screws with a Torx recess. Has
anyone actually encountered such a set screw?

Larry

On 2/1/2021 7:19 PM, Dave Seiter wrote:
  I've *never* seen a Tek knob with a torx set screw.-Dave
     On Monday, February 1, 2021, 12:29:01 PM PST, Joseph Orgnero
<josepho@shaw.ca> wrote:
    In my experience Tek uses only Torx screws on their equipment,
trying to use
Allen or Bristol wrenches is asking for trouble.
Jose Orgnero VE7LBI

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Kruth via groups.io
Sent: Monday, February 01, 2021 11:56 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Extracting a buggered knob grubscrew

While I am sure there are many tips that others have, I found a thin hot
soldering iron pressed into the iron screw socket head will sometimes
add
enough heat(expansion) to get things going. I have also filed cheap
jewelers
screwdrivers into an appropriate sized chisel point and, using
friction fit,
tapped them into the end of the reamed out set screw with a small
hammer.
This can then be grasped with a small pair of vice grips and the
screw may
give.YMMVJeff Kruth In a message dated 2/1/2021 2:46:57 PM Eastern
Standard
Time, snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io writes:
They are typically 1/20" or 0.050" keys. Sometimes it's Bristol drive
but if
someone forced a hex key in there it's probably not a Bristol drive
anymore.

Unfortunately I have found no way to extract a stuck set screw of
that size.
You might try a 1.3mm key, sometimes they really are 1.3 and not 1.27
so you
get a bit more grip. I don't know, seems random.












Tom Lee
 

What products post-2000 have used Torx set screws in their knobs?

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 2/1/2021 22:19, Dave Seiter wrote:
Are there any Torx in ~pre-1985...1990 Tek products?  I don't think I've ever run across one.  Plenty of Torx in post-2000 consumer stuff.
-Dave
On Monday, February 1, 2021, 09:35:40 PM PST, Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:
I've never seen one. That's not the same as declaring that they don't
exist, but I feel safe in saying that they certainly are rare, if they
exist, in Tek scopes.

Tom


Dave Seiter
 

Not Tek or knobs, just Torx in general products (Apple, etc).
-Dave

On Monday, February 1, 2021, 10:22:02 PM PST, Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:

What products post-2000 have used Torx set screws in their knobs?

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 2/1/2021 22:19, Dave Seiter wrote:
  Are there any Torx in ~pre-1985...1990 Tek products?  I don't think I've ever run across one.  Plenty of Torx in post-2000 consumer stuff.
-Dave
      On Monday, February 1, 2021, 09:35:40 PM PST, Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:
 
  I've never seen one. That's not the same as declaring that they don't
exist, but I feel safe in saying that they certainly are rare, if they
exist, in Tek scopes.

Tom


keith@...
 

Thanks for all the tips. I removed one of the 'good' setscrews (from the same knob) and looked at it under the magnifier; it definitely is for an Allen key, not Torx. I have a selection of imperial and metric allen keys, a 1.5mm or 1/16th is the closest fit, the latter being slightly tighter than the former. However it won't grid at all, I think I'm going to have to drill the thing out. If I can find a 3/32 left handed drill bit I might have some luck.


Tom Lee
 

I'm pretty sure that the mentions of Torx were from folks who weren't paying close attention to your subject line. I am very doubtful that Tek ever used Torx set screws in any knobs, so I'm not surprised at what you found.

One other thing I once tried in desperation was to insert the tightest driver I owned, and then heat the tool with a soldering iron. That expanded the gap enough to get things started, fortunately before any plastics started to melt. I don't know if I could recommend this procedure, but I really didn't want to drill it out.

Good luck with whatever procedure you end up trying!

-- Cheers,
Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 2/2/2021 01:38, keith@peardrop.co.uk wrote:
Thanks for all the tips. I removed one of the 'good' setscrews (from the same knob) and looked at it under the magnifier; it definitely is for an Allen key, not Torx. I have a selection of imperial and metric allen keys, a 1.5mm or 1/16th is the closest fit, the latter being slightly tighter than the former. However it won't grid at all, I think I'm going to have to drill the thing out. If I can find a 3/32 left handed drill bit I might have some luck.




-
 

As a last resort you can drill out the screw. But always use a *left
hand* drill bit. I've found that most of the time a *left hand* bit will
dig in and will turn the screw and cause it to unscrew itself from the hole
and will leave the threads relatively unscathed. Left hand bits aren't
easy to find but you can order them. I have a set of them and I keep them
in their own protective box and they're used only to remove stubborn set
screws and broken bolts. For me left hand bits work *much* better than Easy
Outs for removing broken bolts and buggered set screws.

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 8:43 PM Bob Albert via groups.io <bob91343=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have been watching this thread and have a related problem. The main
tuning knob on my Kenwood TS-940S cannot be removed, as the set screw has a
ruined hole and when I try to turn it, it's frozen.
I don't need to remove it but I'd like to know how.
Bob
On Monday, February 1, 2021, 05:30:04 PM PST, greenboxmaven via
groups.io <ka2ivy=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Because there are two grubscrews, remove the good one that did loosen,
apply penetrant to the stuck one, both on it and also down the hole of
the other one. Find a good high strength bolt about an inch long of the
same thread as the good grubscrew, install it, and tighten it sensibly-
not too much! Loosen and tighten it several times to "work" the
bushing inside the knob. Take it easy, the bushing does flex, and that
can help work things loose. I have done this many times with great
results. Grub srews have a cone shaped recess on their tip to dig into
the shaft. Working that loose is key to getting the screw out.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


On 2/1/21 19:14, Michael A. Terrell wrote:
Torx was developed in 1967 and patented in 1971. Bristol was in use
during
WW-II

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 5:33 PM snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

In the 500 series, there are no Torx screws anywhere AFAIK, rather they
are Pozidriv.



















David Slipper
 

Where did you get your set of left-handed drills ???

On 02/02/2021 12:31, - wrote:
I have a set of them and I keep them in their own protective box and they're
used only to remove stubborn set screws and broken bolts. For me left hand
bits work *much* better than Easy Outs for removing broken bolts and
buggered set screws.

On Mon, Feb 1, 2021 at 8:43 PM Bob Albert via groups.io <bob91343=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote: