Topics

CONTACT CLEANER


jstanton@...
 

For many years we used a contact cleaner "Cramolin Red" which used to be distributed by Caig. I went searching for new supplies and discovered that Cramolin is actually German and that Caig's Deoxit is actually their knock-off of Cramolin and is probably just as effective.

We achieved miracles with Cramolin. Temperamental equipment that was plagued with intermittent faults became totally reliable after it was disassembled and all connectors and contacts treated with the Cramolin Red. More recently I have been able to resurrect some Tek plugins and frames that had been stored in a hostile environment by first cleaning switch and other contacts with isopropyl alcohol to rinse away water and alcohol contaminants and then applying Cramolin to attack the oxides and leave a protective, conductive lubricant. This process failed on equipment that had clearly been underwater so dont expect the impossible.

I notice that Cramolin is still in business. I just ordered Caig's sample kit and shall compare it to my Cramolin Red dregs and report the result.

On the subject of cleaning used Tek equipment my biggest problem has been with labels. I find the following method works:
1. Heat the label and attempt to peel it off.
2. Use "Goo Gone" lemon oil solvent to attempt to dislodge it. This is a mild solvent that seems to be kind to plastics.
3. Add some WD40 if it is stubborn. This is a stronger solvent so take more care with it.
4. Aged label adhesive sometimes still resists and then I carefully use some nail polish remover if there is metal or anodizing underneath, using a moistened pad like an art restorer.
5. On a painted or plastic surface where acetone cannot be used remnants can be removed with a scraper using a similar technique one might use to scrape a bearing or a lathe bed (i.e. no gouging).
6. Finally clean with a pure water and "Red Juice" solution. Red Juice is an industrial cleaner that we use and source from "The Clean Team" in San Francisco. It is a detergent without other additives and leaves no residue, no pine smell, just clean. They also make "Blue Juice" which is great for cleaning glass.

My first exposure to Tek scopes was 30 years ago when I carried a 453 to repair mainframe computers (you remember the ones that had thousands of boards and connectors). At that time we knew nothing about contact cleaners and spent endless hours tracing down faults on boards only to find they worked when reseated. Because we used no contact cleaner we would be doing it all over again in a few months time. In retrospect I realize that maybe 90% of our trouble shooting could have been eliminated by treated connectors and contacts.

By the way has anyone before or since made a scope like the 453 that could be dropped down a flight of stairs, bouncing off each stair and still work perfectly? Or be in the trunk of a car when the car was totalled and still work?

It is a credit to the quality of the materials traditionally used by Tek that a little TLC can bring even very poorly cared for equipment back to near-new appearance and function.

Regards

John Stanton


Miroslav Pokorni <mpokorni@...>
 

On the subject of cleaning labels, I found success with ski wax cleaner for
cross country skies. I use 'Swix', which is a Scandinavian brand; if anyone
used ski wax 'clister' (or however you spell the name for that gooey stuff)
you would understand the effectiveness of the cleaner. As a first step I
would clean up with alcohol, to remove stuff that cleans easy. Then I would
dub some Swix on the label and let it seat for a while; non-permeable
labels, like metal or polyester have to be peeled off first and work is on
the glue residue. My preferred pads for cleaning are Kimwipes, a lint free
industrial wipes; they hold together quite well, too. After an hour or so of
socking, I would use the same pad that was used for dubbing, to clean off
glue; socking for an extended time period is feasible because wax cleaner is
quite thick, consistency of a jelly. When there is a lot of glue residue or
it became quite tough over time, only a part of glue would come off. Then
repeated application is called for; I never had to go beyond three
applications.

All painted or etched metal surfaces stand the cleaner without exception, as
well as most plastics. The only thing that I would have doubt about is
transparent plastic. I tried it on a piece of what I believe was acrylic and
surface did get cloudy.

It is very important to clean with alcohol the whole area where wax remover
was applied. The stuff stinks pretty badly and if you do not clean with
alcohol stink will stay with you for long time. The whole operation is best
carried outdoors, with usual fire precautions, too; that is a petroleum
product. All used wipes should be discarded to outdoor garbage can;
possibly, you can use a thicker plastic bag to wrap all used material, but
bare in mind that odors quite easily escape.


Regards

Miroslav Pokorni

-----Original Message-----
From: jstanton@viacognis.com
[mailto:jstanton@viacognis.com]
Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2001 10:05 AM
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [TekScopes] CONTACT CLEANER

For many years we used a contact cleaner "Cramolin Red"
which used to be distributed by Caig. I went searching for new supplies and
discovered that Cramolin is actually German and that Caig's Deoxit is
actually their knock-off of Cramolin and is probably just as effective.

We achieved miracles with Cramolin. Temperamental equipment
that was plagued with intermittent faults became totally reliable after it
was disassembled and all connectors and contacts treated with the Cramolin
Red. More recently I have been able to resurrect some Tek plugins and
frames that had been stored in a hostile environment by first cleaning
switch and other contacts with isopropyl alcohol to rinse away water and
alcohol contaminants and then applying Cramolin to attack the oxides and
leave a protective, conductive lubricant. This process failed on equipment
that had clearly been underwater so dont expect the impossible.

I notice that Cramolin is still in business. I just ordered
Caig's sample kit and shall compare it to my Cramolin Red dregs and report
the result.

On the subject of cleaning used Tek equipment my biggest
problem has been with labels. I find the following method works:
1. Heat the label and attempt to peel it off.
2. Use "Goo Gone" lemon oil solvent to attempt
to dislodge it. This is a mild solvent that seems to be kind to plastics.
3. Add some WD40 if it is stubborn. This is a
stronger solvent so take more care with it.
4. Aged label adhesive sometimes still resists
and then I carefully use some nail polish remover if there is metal or
anodizing underneath, using a moistened pad like an art restorer.
5. On a painted or plastic surface where acetone
cannot be used remnants can be removed with a scraper using a similar
technique one might use to scrape a bearing or a lathe bed (i.e. no
gouging).
6. Finally clean with a pure water and "Red
Juice" solution. Red Juice is an industrial cleaner that we use and source
from "The Clean Team" in San Francisco. It is a detergent without other
additives and leaves no residue, no pine smell, just clean. They also make
"Blue Juice" which is great for cleaning glass.

My first exposure to Tek scopes was 30 years ago when I
carried a 453 to repair mainframe computers (you remember the ones that had
thousands of boards and connectors). At that time we knew nothing about
contact cleaners and spent endless hours tracing down faults on boards only
to find they worked when reseated. Because we used no contact cleaner we
would be doing it all over again in a few months time. In retrospect I
realize that maybe 90% of our trouble shooting could have been eliminated by
treated connectors and contacts.

By the way has anyone before or since made a scope like the
453 that could be dropped down a flight of stairs, bouncing off each stair
and still work perfectly? Or be in the trunk of a car when the car was
totalled and still work?

It is a credit to the quality of the materials traditionally
used by Tek that a little TLC can bring even very poorly cared for equipment
back to near-new appearance and function.

Regards

John Stanton


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