Topics

Asset tag glue removal without damaging finish?

Randy.AB9GO
 

Good day,

I may have missed this in a previous post, but how do you remove the left
over adhesive from the old style aluminum asset tag that use the solvent to
affix the tag to the equipment? Is there a method that will preserve the
finish underneath? Some of the brown paper is also still hanging on.

Thanks,
Randy AB9GO.

This message sent to you from my mobile device via speech-to-text
technology.

John Griessen
 

On 10/21/19 10:11 AM, Randy.AB9GO wrote:
how do you remove the left
over adhesive from the old style aluminum asset tag that use the solvent to
affix the tag to the equipment?
Acetone. Test on finish paint first.

If paint is sensitive, try peeling the aluminum back, rolling it up. Then carefully use razor blade
to remove most of the adhesive, then brief wipes with acetone, IPA, goo-gone, citrus cleaner.

A final polish with gel gloss (or autmotive polishing compound) can be good.

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

Lighter fluid. A lot less aggressive than acetone, which is generally very unfriendly to plastics
(which is why it is the key ingredient in nail varnish remover)

Craig

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Griessen
Sent: 21 October 2019 16:21
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Asset tag glue removal without damaging finish?

On 10/21/19 10:11 AM, Randy.AB9GO wrote:
how do you remove the left
over adhesive from the old style aluminum asset tag that use the
solvent to affix the tag to the equipment?
Acetone. Test on finish paint first.

If paint is sensitive, try peeling the aluminum back, rolling it up. Then carefully use razor
blade to
remove most of the adhesive, then brief wipes with acetone, IPA, goo-gone, citrus cleaner.

A final polish with gel gloss (or autmotive polishing compound) can be good.

Richard Knoppow
 

Ronsonol lighter fluid is Naphtha and fairly safe. WD-40 is mostly Stodard solvent with oil in it which works well and Kerosene will also remove some residue without harming paint.

On 10/21/2019 8:34 AM, Craig Sawyers wrote:
Lighter fluid. A lot less aggressive than acetone, which is generally very unfriendly to plastics
(which is why it is the key ingredient in nail varnish remover)
Craig

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of John Griessen
Sent: 21 October 2019 16:21
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Asset tag glue removal without damaging finish?

On 10/21/19 10:11 AM, Randy.AB9GO wrote:
how do you remove the left
over adhesive from the old style aluminum asset tag that use the
solvent to affix the tag to the equipment?
Acetone. Test on finish paint first.

If paint is sensitive, try peeling the aluminum back, rolling it up. Then carefully use razor
blade to
remove most of the adhesive, then brief wipes with acetone, IPA, goo-gone, citrus cleaner.

A final polish with gel gloss (or autmotive polishing compound) can be good.
--
Richard Knoppow
dickburk@...
WB6KBL

Chuck Harris
 

In the original kit for installing these tags
was a very aggressive solvent type adhesive....
something like MEK, or a mix of MEK and some
vinyl solvents (hydrofurone).

The actual adhesive tape used was pressure sensitive
on the side that stuck to the aluminum tag, and solvent
weld on the side that stuck to the panel.

By solvent weld, I mean that the liquid adhesive that
was applied to the back of the tag dissolved the acrylic(?)
material on the tag, and the paint or plastic on the panel
to which the tag was affixed. The two materials merged
together to become each a part of the other.

If the panel is painted, or plastic coated, it is probably
already damaged beyond salvage. That was the intention of
the makers of the tags.

I usually leave them on, as taking them off looks worse in
the long run.

You have a hope if the panel is anodized aluminum.

-Chuck Harris

Randy.AB9GO wrote:

Good day,

I may have missed this in a previous post, but how do you remove the left
over adhesive from the old style aluminum asset tag that use the solvent to
affix the tag to the equipment? Is there a method that will preserve the
finish underneath? Some of the brown paper is also still hanging on.

Thanks,
Randy AB9GO.

This message sent to you from my mobile device via speech-to-text
technology.



Greg Muir
 

As to removing this type of adhesive without damage to the surface it is adhered to - it basically does not happen.

As Chuck Harris has stated this type of adherence becomes an inherent part of the surface it is attached to. If you are lucky the seller has left the tag attached rather than removing it by some Draconian measure such as a pocket knife or other sharp instrument. The most frustrating thing is when these people place the tag in an area where it covers part of panel nomenclature or is stuck on at some odd angle so as to garner your constant attention when using the instrument.

Depending on anodized surfaces it is a gamble if the surface may be damaged or not. I have witnessed discoloration as well as problems with certain surfaces where the manufacturer has applied a plastic coat which comes off with any attempt at label removal.

Think of some labels as a badge of honor from where the item came. If it is of an interesting nature I simply leave it attached even if it isn't the bad hardened brown goo that you are speaking of. Many people ask me why I have a lot of equipment sporting USAF TDME labels or that one item with the NORAD Cheyenne Mountain moniker. Besides, it may help if some nefarious person decides to "lift" that certain piece of equipment and you manage to track it down again providing you have made a note of the label information.

Greg

Randy.AB9GO
 

Thanks for all the good ideas. I would have left the labels alone but
someone removed them before I acquired the calibrator. 😡. It is a shame
as the unit is like new otherwise and works great.

Randy AB9GO.

This message sent to you from my mobile device via speech-to-text
technology.

Gary Robert Bosworth
 

I have always used Ronsonol lighter fluid. It is harmless on most plastics
and paints.

Gary

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 19:37 Randy.AB9GO <@AB9GO> wrote:

Thanks for all the good ideas. I would have left the labels alone but
someone removed them before I acquired the calibrator. 😡. It is a shame
as the unit is like new otherwise and works great.

Randy AB9GO.

This message sent to you from my mobile device via speech-to-text
technology.



ken chalfant
 

Greetings,

I have had success with WD-40 and patience.

Almost every time I had got impatience and tried to use a razor blade to speed up the process I end up scratching the surface.

Alcohol works good to remove the remain WD-40 residue. Acetone has a nasty habit of harming plastics and many kinds of finished and painted surfaces.

My two cents FWIW.

Regards,

Ken

On 21Oct, 2019, at 8:42 PM, Gary Robert Bosworth <@grbosworth<mailto:@grbosworth>> wrote:

I have always used Ronsonol lighter fluid. It is harmless on most plastics
and paints.

Gary

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019, 19:37 Randy.AB9GO <@AB9GO<mailto:@AB9GO>> wrote:

Thanks for all the good ideas. I would have left the labels alone but
someone removed them before I acquired the calibrator. 😡. It is a shame
as the unit is like new otherwise and works great.

Randy AB9GO.

This message sent to you from my mobile device via speech-to-text
technology.

Tom Green
 

Yes, Ronsonol lighter fluid, which is just Naptha. Won't harm the finish.
You can buy a can of naptha at the hardware store. Or Ronsonol at the
supermarket (more expensive)

Acetone will craze plastic and remove paint. BEWARE!

Tom

On Mon, Oct 21, 2019 at 11:34 AM Craig Sawyers <
c.sawyers@...> wrote:

Lighter fluid. A lot less aggressive than acetone, which is generally very
unfriendly to plastics
(which is why it is the key ingredient in nail varnish remover)

Craig

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
John Griessen
Sent: 21 October 2019 16:21
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Asset tag glue removal without damaging finish?

On 10/21/19 10:11 AM, Randy.AB9GO wrote:
how do you remove the left
over adhesive from the old style aluminum asset tag that use the
solvent to affix the tag to the equipment?
Acetone. Test on finish paint first.

If paint is sensitive, try peeling the aluminum back, rolling it up.
Then carefully use razor
blade to
remove most of the adhesive, then brief wipes with acetone, IPA,
goo-gone, citrus cleaner.

A final polish with gel gloss (or autmotive polishing compound) can be
good.





 

Hi Randy,

NAPTHA can be bought in hardware stores and paint stores in quart or gallon cans is ideal for removing glue and sticky residue on any surface. It does not harm the surface or the paint at all. Also, it is inexpensive. I have used it for years. This summer I removed the labels and residue from every plugin I had. It never once harmed anything and it dissolves virtually all kinds of adhesive. The only adhesive it was ineffective on was a sort of epoxy that was used to glue down metal labels that were never supposed to be removed.

To remove epoxy use XYLENE. It is sold in hardware stores and paint stores. It comes in quart or gallon cans. Xylene is the main ingredient of Goof-Off. "Xylol", and "dimethylbenzene" are other names for Xylene. Use this chemical in a well ventilated area.

Apparently Goof-Off has recently been reformulated with ACETONE instead of XYLENE according to one web page I just looked at.
BEWARE: Both XYLENE and ACETONE damage most plastics, painted surfaces, and just about everything they come in touch with. So you should restrict their use to removing epoxy as long as you don't have any surfaces that could be harmed.

GOO GONE, a citrus scented chemical, is not as strong as NAPTHA when cleaning glue and sticky residue but it smells a lot better.

Recently I became aware of MISTER CLEAN MAGIC ERASER pads. They were originally introduced as ~1 inch thick pads but now they have thinner ones that can get into tiny places. They have a very odd texture and it is hard to imagine how this stuff could clean anything since it is so soft. Those are excellent for removing pencil and pen marks on Tek panels. I think they must have an extremely fine abrasive imbedded into them that does a good job on these markings without harming anything else. You can also use it to shine up the aluminum frame of your plugins.

90% pure (or better) ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL does a good job of dissolving the ink from permanent marker pens. A small percentage of the ink will get absorbed into the anodized aluminum front panels when it is applied and that will require more than just alcohol to get rid of. I follow the alcohol with a good rubbing using the Magic Eraser pads. That combination does a good job of getting rid of about 95% of the permanent marker ink.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: Randy.AB9GO
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2019 8:11 AM

Good day,

I may have missed this in a previous post, but how do you remove the left over adhesive from the old style aluminum asset tag that use the solvent to affix the tag to the equipment? Is there a method that will preserve the finish underneath? Some of the brown paper is also still hanging on.

Thanks,
Randy AB9GO.



--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

NigelP
 

Actually in the UK you can buy Electrolube Label remover LRM; I've used it on dozens of asset labels on Tek and HP stuff without issue and it often works better than regular electronic safety solvents.

Nigel G8AYM

Chuck Harris
 

Paper, aluminum, and plastic thin flexible labels are annoying,
but easy.

How does your solvent work on the aluminum inflexible asset tags?
(which are the original subject of this thread)

Also, for those that buy Goo-Gone in large spray bottles, the citrus
oil, and citrus solvent separate out with the thick oil down on the
bottom of the bottle, and the thin solvent at the top. When this
happens, Goo-Gone won't remove anything, as the thick oil won't
dissolve the adhesive.

Folks that buy the small squeeze bottles won't notice this, because
the thin solvent is up on top, near the nozzle. The spray bottles,
on the other hand, draw from the very bottom of the bottle.

Give the bottle a shake from time to time.

-Chuck Harris

NigelP wrote:

Actually in the UK you can buy Electrolube Label remover LRM; I've used it on dozens of asset labels on Tek and HP stuff without issue and it often works better than regular electronic safety solvents.

Nigel G8AYM






c n
 

One thing not mentioned by others is to wipe the paper/adhesive in vegetable oil often for several days. Often it will turn the adhesive into a soft goo which can be removed with lighter fluid or dish soap and water and cause a minimum of harm. It does not always work though.
--
Chuck N.
547 453 475

johnasolecki@...
 

Don't know if it's been mentioned before but plastic razor blades are indispensable for label removal. They won't help with the type of adhesive that permanently bonds to the finish but are a great tool to remove other label types and won't damage the finish. Get the type that has a holder to apply more force.

Here's one example:

https://www.amazon.com/Ehdis-Visibility-Plastic-Scraping-Windshields/dp/B01HLWB0BM/ref=sr_1_5?crid=113FC63LT9OTW&keywords=plastic+razor+blades+with+holder&qid=1571837893&sprefix=plastic+razor+blades%2Caps%2C345&sr=8-5

Greg Muir
 

A fingernail (preferably a thumbnail) works fine. Simply spread a little of your non-aggressive label remover over the adhesive, wait a few minutes for it to soften then slide the fingernail over the adhesive and it will come off without any problem. I have never had any incidents where any surface (plastic, painted, etc.) has shown any signs of damage or scratching. The softness of the nail is a perfect match.

No matter what kind of a tool you use to remove the adhesive the key objective here is having patience to let the label remover do its job and soften the adhesive. Most times I can simply wipe a paper towel over the softened adhesive and it will come off quickly. Q-tips help as well using a rotating motion of the Q-tip stem as you wipe it over the surface to pick up the adhesive.

Greg

Chuck Harris
 

Better than a fingernail, which is subject to painful
torn nail beds due to paper bits getting stuffed under
the nail, is to take one of those tin handled "acid"
bristle brushes, and cut it's bristles to 1/4 inch long.

Use the shortened brush at a slight angle, to brush at
the edges of the goo-gone/WD40/naptha/IPA/hexane covered
sticker.

Speaking of hexane, the active ingredient of Carter's
Rubber cement thinner/remover. Hexane and its isomers
are what Coleman Stove fuel is made of. It is generally
cheaper by the gallon than Carter's (or its current
incarnation, Bestine) is by the pint.

But sadly, none of these suggestions will do anything to
remove the remains of the stiff aluminum asset tags the
OP was discussing.

-Chuck Harris

Greg Muir via Groups.Io wrote:

A fingernail (preferably a thumbnail) works fine. Simply spread a little of your non-aggressive label remover over the adhesive, wait a few minutes for it to soften then slide the fingernail over the adhesive and it will come off without any problem. I have never had any incidents where any surface (plastic, painted, etc.) has shown any signs of damage or scratching. The softness of the nail is a perfect match.

No matter what kind of a tool you use to remove the adhesive the key objective here is having patience to let the label remover do its job and soften the adhesive. Most times I can simply wipe a paper towel over the softened adhesive and it will come off quickly. Q-tips help as well using a rotating motion of the Q-tip stem as you wipe it over the surface to pick up the adhesive.

Greg



Renée
 

what also works great are guitar picks and woodwind reeds ( both synthetic and cane)....I have plenty of the latter. I get my used guitar picks from my colleagues at work.....
Renée

On 2019-10-23 9:54 a.m., Chuck Harris wrote:
Better than a fingernail, which is subject to painful
torn nail beds due to paper bits getting stuffed under
the nail, is to take one of those tin handled "acid"
bristle brushes, and cut it's bristles to 1/4 inch long.

Use the shortened brush at a slight angle, to brush at
the edges of the goo-gone/WD40/naptha/IPA/hexane covered
sticker.

Speaking of hexane, the active ingredient of Carter's
Rubber cement thinner/remover. Hexane and its isomers
are what Coleman Stove fuel is made of. It is generally
cheaper by the gallon than Carter's (or its current
incarnation, Bestine) is by the pint.

But sadly, none of these suggestions will do anything to
remove the remains of the stiff aluminum asset tags the
OP was discussing.

-Chuck Harris

Greg Muir via Groups.Io wrote:
A fingernail (preferably a thumbnail) works fine. Simply spread a little of your non-aggressive label remover over the adhesive, wait a few minutes for it to soften then slide the fingernail over the adhesive and it will come off without any problem. I have never had any incidents where any surface (plastic, painted, etc.) has shown any signs of damage or scratching. The softness of the nail is a perfect match.

No matter what kind of a tool you use to remove the adhesive the key objective here is having patience to let the label remover do its job and soften the adhesive. Most times I can simply wipe a paper towel over the softened adhesive and it will come off quickly. Q-tips help as well using a rotating motion of the Q-tip stem as you wipe it over the surface to pick up the adhesive.

Greg



Brian Cockburn
 

Randy,

My recent experience with Acetone was not what you want. I used it very successfully to strip all the paint off my 2245A. It was excellent at this job, so will be a big NO NO for you.

Brian.

 

One more tool I forgot to mention that can help soften glue in some situations is HEAT from a hot air gun or from putting the plugin in an oven set to 150F to 175F. Those thick aluminum asset tags held on with some kind of epoxy or brittle glue are softened and come off easier if you get them hot.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Tillman W7PF
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2019 9:57 PM

Hi Randy,

NAPTHA can be bought in hardware stores and paint stores in quart or gallon cans is ideal for removing glue and sticky residue on any surface. It does not harm the surface or the paint at all. Also, it is inexpensive. I have used it for years. This summer I removed the labels and residue from every plugin I had. It never once harmed anything and it dissolves virtually all kinds of adhesive. The only adhesive it was ineffective on was a sort of epoxy that was used to glue down metal labels that were never supposed to be removed.

To remove epoxy use XYLENE. It is sold in hardware stores and paint stores. It comes in quart or gallon cans. Xylene is the main ingredient of Goof-Off. "Xylol", and "dimethylbenzene" are other names for Xylene. Use this chemical in a well ventilated area.

Apparently Goof-Off has recently been reformulated with ACETONE instead of XYLENE according to one web page I just looked at.
BEWARE: Both XYLENE and ACETONE damage most plastics, painted surfaces, and just about everything they come in touch with. So you should restrict their use to removing epoxy as long as you don't have any surfaces that could be harmed.

GOO GONE, a citrus scented chemical, is not as strong as NAPTHA when cleaning glue and sticky residue but it smells a lot better.

Recently I became aware of MISTER CLEAN MAGIC ERASER pads. They were originally introduced as ~1 inch thick pads but now they have thinner ones that can get into tiny places. They have a very odd texture and it is hard to imagine how this stuff could clean anything since it is so soft. Those are excellent for removing pencil and pen marks on Tek panels. I think they must have an extremely fine abrasive imbedded into them that does a good job on these markings without harming anything else. You can also use it to shine up the aluminum frame of your plugins.

90% pure (or better) ISOPROPYL ALCOHOL does a good job of dissolving the ink from permanent marker pens. A small percentage of the ink will get absorbed into the anodized aluminum front panels when it is applied and that will require more than just alcohol to get rid of. I follow the alcohol with a good rubbing using the Magic Eraser pads. That combination does a good job of getting rid of about 95% of the permanent marker ink.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: Randy.AB9GO
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2019 8:11 AM

Good day,

I may have missed this in a previous post, but how do you remove the left over adhesive from the old style aluminum asset tag that use the solvent to affix the tag to the equipment? Is there a method that will preserve the finish underneath? Some of the brown paper is also still hanging on.

Thanks,
Randy AB9GO



--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator