Topics

Alcohol (was: Re: [TekScopes] Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers)


Brad Thompson
 

n4buq wrote on 12/16/2020 11:30 AM:

This place is less than 25 miles from me (easy drive) but they don't offer over-the-counter sales so I haven't made myself pay for shipping; however, the base price is reasonable.

https://www.dudadiesel.com/choose_item.php?id=isoprop

Not affiliated with the company in any way.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chuck Harris" <cfharris@erols.com>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Saturday, December 12, 2020 9:14:14 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers

I used to buy 99% IPA at the local Safeway all the time.

And, yes, it is hygroscopic. If it isn't tightly covered,
it will turn into 91%.

Since COVID, I can't get anything stronger than 70%.

Hello--
Dunno what state-controlled liquor regulations are in force where you live,
you might consider buying some Everclear or other 190-proof grain alcohol
for use as a solvent. Like isopropyl alcohol, grain alcohol is hygroscopic.
I've used it as a rosin-flux cleaner.

For example, the New Hampshire state liquor stores' catalog lists Graves 190-proof "American vodka"
for $14.99 per fifth (750 mL). OTOH, a few years ago I attempted to buy a pint of
grain alcohol in a Vermont state store and  had to fill out a request form. Delivery took
a week, IIRC.

As for using 190-proof as a beverage or punchbowl-spiking agent, I'll leave that to the
frat boys in the small college up the road. It's a dangerous drug, and alcohol poisoning
is no joke.

73--

Brad  AA1IP
**********
Obligatory alcohol-related stale jokes, sources unknown::

"...I don't drink anything stronger than pop (but Pop will drink most anything), and
Uncle Joe (who believed in the  content of any advertisement) saw a billboard
stating "Drink Canada Dry" and we never saw him again...."


greenboxmaven
 

Isopropyl alcohol also works well to remove the vile residue left when polyurethane belts or foam decompose. It is also very good for cleaning magnetic tape heads. Heet brand (and probably others too) fuel line antifreeze is also available in isopropyl formulation at auto supply stores. It would be fine for removing label residue, but don't use it on tape heads, it's not pure enough.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 12/16/20 14:42, Brad Thompson wrote:
n4buq wrote on 12/16/2020 11:30 AM:

This place is less than 25 miles from me (easy drive) but they don't offer over-the-counter sales so I haven't made myself pay for shipping; however, the base price is reasonable.

https://www.dudadiesel.com/choose_item.php?id=isoprop

Not affiliated with the company in any way.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ



Roy Thistle
 

On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 11:42 AM, Brad Thompson wrote:


190-proof
that's about 95% (compared to 99.9% or 99%)... but, unless you handle the 99 stuff carefully... and have a large volume of it... it soon will go towards 95% anyway. (If anyone is interested in how to keep it at as high a concentration as possible... I can make suggestions... but, I'm not sure we are supposed to be discussing "alcohol" on TekScopes?)


Roy Thistle
 

On Wed, Dec 16, 2020 at 11:42 AM, Brad Thompson wrote:


they don't offer over-the-counter sales
Their selling to companies making bio-diesel, or bio-based heating "oil" ... they're selling the stuff needed to make, process, and test.
If they will sell to people... probably you'd need an account with them... and you'd probably have to be a user/maker of bio-fuel... and some farmers might be doing that... or truckers too.
If you're just looking for a litre of isopropanol, to swab your 465b, it seems like the fastest way to get on a "watch list" to me.


 

I don't understand why people are having trouble obtaining isopropyl alcohol. If I just search on Amazon for "99.9 Isopropyl" I get plenty of hits. The only problem I see is that they all seem to be packaged in plastic containers: I was hoping to get a steel bottle like my current can of (probably well below 99.9% due to age) IPA from GC Electronics (they still seem to be a going concern, but Amazon does not list IPA from them).

I'm sure that I bought this can of IPA from a local electronics supply store (Marc Electronics in Beltsville MD, no longer in business). I'm pretty sure that the can is at least 15 years old, but it may be two or three times that old. The date code is not legible, but the price, for 16 fl. oz. is $5.52, which seems low even for 2005.


Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

Isopropyl alcohol has been scarce in drugstores since the pandemic started;
it's in demand as a hand sanitizer. The CVS near me has had it for the past
month (it's featured in the display of COVID-related products near the
door), but before that it was unavailable there.

There are plenty of hits on Amazon NOW, though mostly from brands nobody
has ever heard of so some of us are suspicious of their provenance. A few
months ago, not so much.

On Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 1:21 AM Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

I don't understand why people are having trouble obtaining isopropyl
alcohol. If I just search on Amazon for "99.9 Isopropyl" I get plenty of
hits. The only problem I see is that they all seem to be packaged in
plastic containers: I was hoping to get a steel bottle like my current can
of (probably well below 99.9% due to age) IPA from GC Electronics (they
still seem to be a going concern, but Amazon does not list IPA from them).

I'm sure that I bought this can of IPA from a local electronics supply
store (Marc Electronics in Beltsville MD, no longer in business). I'm
pretty sure that the can is at least 15 years old, but it may be two or
three times that old. The date code is not legible, but the price, for 16
fl. oz. is $5.52, which seems low even for 2005.






stevenhorii
 

I purchased 99% isopropyl alcohol from Alliance Chemical (
Alliance@alliancechemical.com). I bought two gallons. Each gallon is packed
in 1-quart plastic bottles with a foil seal under the cap. This likely will
not stop some water absorption, but it is better than not having a foil
seal. I think they use plastic bottles because of the fragility of glass
and the lighter weight. As it is, the shipping cost was high but it is a
flammable liquid, so the package goes by ground service and I suspect there
is a surcharge for flammable liquids, though I am not sure whether or not
the carriers consider flash point or self-ignition temperature when
classifying flammables. At any rate, if you search Amazon for
"Ispropyl alcohol 99% technical grade" and search under "Industrial and
Scientific" a number of vendors come up and almost all showed "in stock".
If I just searched "isopropyl alcohol" under the usual "Health, household
and baby care" most of the dealers that showed up sold the 1 quart/liter
bottles only (though you could always purchase multiples) and many were out
of stock. Most also only listed 70% isopropyl alcohol. This was back in
April, so there was likely a lot of panic buying going on. I have noticed
that as of late last month, the pharmacy I go to had "rubbing alcohol" on
the shelves again - which is almost always 70% isopropyl, though
surprisingly, they used to sell 70% ethyl alcohol as rubbing alcohol as
well - no tax seal, so I don't know how they denatured it; it was not
labeled "denatured" and the ingredients did not say what the denaturing
agent was. I was looking to be sure it was not methyl alcohol as a
denaturant.

I have no financial interest in Alliance Chemical.

Steve Horii

On Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 1:21 AM Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

I don't understand why people are having trouble obtaining isopropyl
alcohol. If I just search on Amazon for "99.9 Isopropyl" I get plenty of
hits. The only problem I see is that they all seem to be packaged in
plastic containers: I was hoping to get a steel bottle like my current can
of (probably well below 99.9% due to age) IPA from GC Electronics (they
still seem to be a going concern, but Amazon does not list IPA from them).

I'm sure that I bought this can of IPA from a local electronics supply
store (Marc Electronics in Beltsville MD, no longer in business). I'm
pretty sure that the can is at least 15 years old, but it may be two or
three times that old. The date code is not legible, but the price, for 16
fl. oz. is $5.52, which seems low even for 2005.






Chuck Harris
 

None of us understand the supply shortages COVID caused
completely.

I used to be able to get 16 oz of 99% IPA from Safeway for
$2 and change. Now I can't.

I used to be able to get 64 oz of 99% IPA from Costco for
$7 and change. Now I can't.

Buying from Amazon should incur a hazardous materials (ORM-D)
shipping premium. If it doesn't, the shipper is cheating,
and a nice fire could render everyone involved poorer.

Buying from DigiKey will incur a shipping and ORM-D charge
that costs more than the IPA.

Sad about Mark Electronics... I liked the Liz and Scott...
but the business model was always sketchy.

-Chuck Harris

Jeff Dutky wrote:

I don't understand why people are having trouble obtaining isopropyl alcohol. If I just search on Amazon for "99.9 Isopropyl" I get plenty of hits. The only problem I see is that they all seem to be packaged in plastic containers: I was hoping to get a steel bottle like my current can of (probably well below 99.9% due to age) IPA from GC Electronics (they still seem to be a going concern, but Amazon does not list IPA from them).

I'm sure that I bought this can of IPA from a local electronics supply store (Marc Electronics in Beltsville MD, no longer in business). I'm pretty sure that the can is at least 15 years old, but it may be two or three times that old. The date code is not legible, but the price, for 16 fl. oz. is $5.52, which seems low even for 2005.






Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

Amazon is likely to be using its own shipping for orders of alcohol
whenever possible. No idea whether their drivers are giving the stuff
proper respect.

On Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 9:55 AM Chuck Harris <cfharris@erols.com> wrote:

None of us understand the supply shortages COVID caused
completely.

I used to be able to get 16 oz of 99% IPA from Safeway for
$2 and change. Now I can't.

I used to be able to get 64 oz of 99% IPA from Costco for
$7 and change. Now I can't.

Buying from Amazon should incur a hazardous materials (ORM-D)
shipping premium. If it doesn't, the shipper is cheating,
and a nice fire could render everyone involved poorer.

Buying from DigiKey will incur a shipping and ORM-D charge
that costs more than the IPA.

Sad about Mark Electronics... I liked the Liz and Scott...
but the business model was always sketchy.

-Chuck Harris

Jeff Dutky wrote:
I don't understand why people are having trouble obtaining isopropyl
alcohol. If I just search on Amazon for "99.9 Isopropyl" I get plenty of
hits. The only problem I see is that they all seem to be packaged in
plastic containers: I was hoping to get a steel bottle like my current can
of (probably well below 99.9% due to age) IPA from GC Electronics (they
still seem to be a going concern, but Amazon does not list IPA from them).

I'm sure that I bought this can of IPA from a local electronics supply
store (Marc Electronics in Beltsville MD, no longer in business). I'm
pretty sure that the can is at least 15 years old, but it may be two or
three times that old. The date code is not legible, but the price, for 16
fl. oz. is $5.52, which seems low even for 2005.










 

Many of the COVID-caused supply shortages are just demand shocks: just-in-time manufacturing and delivery is very good if the demand is predictable, but when demand doubles or triples (as happened, for example, with toilet paper) it can take quite a while for supply to readjust. I suspect, however, that another factor in the ongoing shortages is that many manufacturing operations have very little excess labor capacity, and that only a few people out sick is enough to bring entire operations to a halt. It's one thing if you have to cover for one person out sick for a week or two, but when 10% of your staff is out for two weeks you probably don't have enough cross-trained people to cover all positions. Now multiply that across dozens of companies involved in any supply chain and you get massive shortages of all kinds of things, even things that are not directly being demanded by the crisis.

None of this is to say that I completely understand the supply shortages caused by COVID, I just think it's a fascinating example of how complex systems can fail under unexpected conditions.

-- Jeff Dutky


stevenhorii
 

From what I saw of shortages as COVID-19 turned from an epidemic to a
pandemic was a near-immediate sell out of rubbing alcohol in pharmacies and
supermarkets (at least the local ones I go to, but they are part of
national chains) as well as hand sanitizer, sanitizing wipes, Lysol and
other disinfecting sprays, and the more newsworthy shortages of toilet
paper and paper towels (oh, and milk, eggs, and bread). I think people were
looking for 99% IPA because there were plenty of Web sites that tell you
how to make your own hand sanitizer, but the final alcohol percentage
should be at least 70-75% according to the CDC so starting with 70% IPA and
adding stuff like aloe vera gel and some fragrance will dilute it too much.
My colleagues and I joked about buying a high-proof vodka if you didn't
mind the cost. You could then drink what you didn't use to make hand
sanitizer. There's a Vodka called Spirytus that is 192 proof or 96% ethanol
(we looked it up to see if you could actually do this).

On Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 10:44 AM Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Many of the COVID-caused supply shortages are just demand shocks:
just-in-time manufacturing and delivery is very good if the demand is
predictable, but when demand doubles or triples (as happened, for example,
with toilet paper) it can take quite a while for supply to readjust. I
suspect, however, that another factor in the ongoing shortages is that many
manufacturing operations have very little excess labor capacity, and that
only a few people out sick is enough to bring entire operations to a halt.
It's one thing if you have to cover for one person out sick for a week or
two, but when 10% of your staff is out for two weeks you probably don't
have enough cross-trained people to cover all positions. Now multiply that
across dozens of companies involved in any supply chain and you get massive
shortages of all kinds of things, even things that are not directly being
demanded by the crisis.

None of this is to say that I completely understand the supply shortages
caused by COVID, I just think it's a fascinating example of how complex
systems can fail under unexpected conditions.

-- Jeff Dutky






Chuck Harris
 

The ORM-D regulations are enforced by USDOT, not the shipper.

Interstate Amazon shippers have to comply with USDOT regulations.

Intrastate, not so much... though they do have to comply with
the state's DOT regulations.

-Chuck Harris

Shirley Dulcey KE1L wrote:

Amazon is likely to be using its own shipping for orders of alcohol
whenever possible. No idea whether their drivers are giving the stuff
proper respect.

On Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 9:55 AM Chuck Harris <cfharris@erols.com> wrote:

None of us understand the supply shortages COVID caused
completely.

I used to be able to get 16 oz of 99% IPA from Safeway for
$2 and change. Now I can't.

I used to be able to get 64 oz of 99% IPA from Costco for
$7 and change. Now I can't.

Buying from Amazon should incur a hazardous materials (ORM-D)
shipping premium. If it doesn't, the shipper is cheating,
and a nice fire could render everyone involved poorer.

Buying from DigiKey will incur a shipping and ORM-D charge
that costs more than the IPA.

Sad about Mark Electronics... I liked the Liz and Scott...
but the business model was always sketchy.

-Chuck Harris

Jeff Dutky wrote:
I don't understand why people are having trouble obtaining isopropyl
alcohol. If I just search on Amazon for "99.9 Isopropyl" I get plenty of
hits. The only problem I see is that they all seem to be packaged in
plastic containers: I was hoping to get a steel bottle like my current can
of (probably well below 99.9% due to age) IPA from GC Electronics (they
still seem to be a going concern, but Amazon does not list IPA from them).

I'm sure that I bought this can of IPA from a local electronics supply
store (Marc Electronics in Beltsville MD, no longer in business). I'm
pretty sure that the can is at least 15 years old, but it may be two or
three times that old. The date code is not legible, but the price, for 16
fl. oz. is $5.52, which seems low even for 2005.














Jim Ford
 

I just saw 70% and 91% IPA (IsoPropyl Alcohol, not India Pale Ale!) for sale at the local Ralphs supermarket here in Southern California.  Still chuckling at that name Ralphs 32 years after moving from the Northeast, where "ralph" is slang for "to vomit"!   Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: stevenhorii <sonodocsch@gmail.com> Date: 12/17/20 8:35 AM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: Alcohol (was: Re: [TekScopes] Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers) From what I saw of shortages as COVID-19 turned from an epidemic to apandemic was a near-immediate sell out of rubbing alcohol in pharmacies andsupermarkets (at least the local ones I go to, but they are part ofnational chains) as well as hand sanitizer, sanitizing wipes, Lysol andother disinfecting sprays, and the more newsworthy shortages of toiletpaper and paper towels (oh, and milk, eggs, and bread). I think people werelooking for 99% IPA because there were plenty of Web sites that tell youhow to make your own hand sanitizer, but the final alcohol percentageshould be at least 70-75% according to the CDC so starting with 70% IPA andadding stuff like aloe vera gel and some fragrance will dilute it too much.My colleagues and I joked about buying a high-proof vodka if you didn'tmind the cost. You could then drink what you didn't use to make handsanitizer. There's a Vodka called Spirytus that is 192 proof or 96% ethanol(we looked it up to see if you could actually do this).On Thu, Dec 17, 2020 at 10:44 AM Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:> Many of the COVID-caused supply shortages are just demand shocks:> just-in-time manufacturing and delivery is very good if the demand is> predictable, but when demand doubles or triples (as happened, for example,> with toilet paper) it can take quite a while for supply to readjust. I> suspect, however, that another factor in the ongoing shortages is that many> manufacturing operations have very little excess labor capacity, and that> only a few people out sick is enough to bring entire operations to a halt.> It's one thing if you have to cover for one person out sick for a week or> two, but when 10% of your staff is out for two weeks you probably don't> have enough cross-trained people to cover all positions. Now multiply that> across dozens of companies involved in any supply chain and you get massive> shortages of all kinds of things, even things that are not directly being> demanded by the crisis.>> None of this is to say that I completely understand the supply shortages> caused by COVID, I just think it's a fascinating example of how complex> systems can fail under unexpected conditions.>> -- Jeff Dutky>>> >>>


Jean-Paul
 

Bonjour a tous:

1/ successful on the TEK blue covers and adhesive using Goo Gone, and abrasive plastic like ScotchBrite. All clean and no residue.

2/ Amazon has 1 gal 99% iso alc ~ 24 incl free ship. 4 ga $84

Search Isopropyl Alcoho 99%

NO haz mat shipping chg

Jon


Dave Seiter
 

Waaayyyy off topic, but what I was fascinated by was the data from toilet paper manufacturers that stated the the *average* TP use was 1/3-1/2 roll per person, per day.  Who uses that much?!  Around here, we go through a roll in about three weeks per person.  (I actually started keeping track)  Of course, these are the large Costco rolls, but still...
-Dave

On Thursday, December 17, 2020, 07:43:53 AM PST, Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Many of the COVID-caused supply shortages are just demand shocks: just-in-time manufacturing and delivery is very good if the demand is predictable, but when demand doubles or triples (as happened, for example, with toilet paper) it can take quite a while for supply to readjust. I suspect, however, that another factor in the ongoing shortages is that many manufacturing operations have very little excess labor capacity, and that only a few people out sick is enough to bring entire operations to a halt. It's one thing if you have to cover for one person out sick for a week or two, but when 10% of your staff is out for two weeks you probably don't have enough cross-trained people to cover all positions. Now multiply that across dozens of companies involved in any supply chain and you get massive shortages of all kinds of things, even things that are not directly being demanded by the crisis.

None of this is to say that I completely understand the supply shortages caused by COVID, I just think it's a fascinating example of how complex systems can fail under unexpected conditions.

-- Jeff Dutky


 

Dave,
TOO FAR OFF TOPIC.
Please stop this nonsense.
Dennis Tillman W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Seiter
Sent: Thursday, December 17, 2020 11:16 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: Alcohol (was: Re: [TekScopes] Remove adhesive from old Tek aluminium cabinet covers)

Waaayyyy off topic, but what I was fascinated by was the data from toilet paper manufacturers that stated the the *average* TP use was 1/3-1/2 roll per person, per day. Who uses that much?! Around here, we go through a roll in about three weeks per person. (I actually started keeping track) Of course, these are the large Costco rolls, but still...
-Dave
On Thursday, December 17, 2020, 07:43:53 AM PST, Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

Many of the COVID-caused supply shortages are just demand shocks: just-in-time manufacturing and delivery is very good if the demand is predictable, but when demand doubles or triples (as happened, for example, with toilet paper) it can take quite a while for supply to readjust. I suspect, however, that another factor in the ongoing shortages is that many manufacturing operations have very little excess labor capacity, and that only a few people out sick is enough to bring entire operations to a halt. It's one thing if you have to cover for one person out sick for a week or two, but when 10% of your staff is out for two weeks you probably don't have enough cross-trained people to cover all positions. Now multiply that across dozens of companies involved in any supply chain and you get massive shortages of all kinds of things, even things that are not directly being demanded by the crisis.

None of this is to say that I completely understand the supply shortages caused by COVID, I just think it's a fascinating example of how complex systems can fail under unexpected conditions.

-- Jeff Dutky











--
Dennis Tillman W7pF
TekScopes Moderator