So while we are all here talking oscilloscopes


snapdiode
 

Does anyone know if Russians ever made a reaaaaaaaally long CRT to direct-view GHz signals? I have this notion in my mind but I have no idea if it's true or what.


Chuck Harris <cfharris@...>
 

It has been reported that they did.

-Chuck Harris

snapdiode via groups.io wrote:

Does anyone know if Russians ever made a reaaaaaaaally long CRT to direct-view GHz signals?
I have this notion in my mind but I have no idea if it's true or what.






Dave Seiter
 

Seems to me that I've seen photos or drawings of them, possibly while looking into 519 history.  I know I've seen references to them, but don't recall if they were Russian or just early attempts by various universities to get to the GHz threshold.
-Dave

On Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 03:18:49 PM PST, snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Does anyone know if Russians ever made a reaaaaaaaally long CRT to direct-view GHz signals?
I have this notion in my mind but I have no idea if it's true or what.


toby@...
 

On 2021-02-02 8:10 p.m., Dave Seiter wrote:
Seems to me that I've seen photos or drawings of them, possibly while looking into 519 history.  I know I've seen references to them, but don't recall if they were Russian or just early attempts by various universities to get to the GHz threshold.
AIUI the driver for high speed scopes was nuclear testing...

--Toby

-Dave
On Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 03:18:49 PM PST, snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Does anyone know if Russians ever made a reaaaaaaaally long CRT to direct-view GHz signals?
I have this notion in my mind but I have no idea if it's true or what.










Albert LaFrance
 

Don't now about the Russians. but we made one right here in 'murica:
<http://lampes-et-tubes.info/doc/wamoscope.php?l=e>

Albert

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of snapdiode via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, February 02, 2021 6:19 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] So while we are all here talking oscilloscopes

Does anyone know if Russians ever made a reaaaaaaaally long CRT to direct-view GHz signals?
I have this notion in my mind but I have no idea if it's true or what.


snapdiode
 

Interesting, this looks like it demodulates a 3GHz carrier and displays the "video"?


Roger Evans
 

Travelling wave deflection CRTs and complete scopes were developed independently in the USA, USSR, UK and France, see the article in IEEE transactions referenced in the TekWiki entry for the 519 (you will have to search a bit more deeply to find any reference to the UK 2GHz instrument which I believe was only used in the defence sector). The French Thomson CSF scopes were marketed quite widely and showed that the right way to go is not longer CRTs but smaller beam spot sizes. The French design ended up at 7GHz with a 70um spot size, 10 x 12mm viewing area, built in channel plate intensifier and 7GHz bandwidth.

Regards,

Roger


ditter2
 

I have heard that YES, they did. I am not sure about directly viewed CRTs, but they did make scan converter tubes similar to the one Tek used in the 7912AD. I heard this second hand, from an engineer working for EG&G at the Nevada Test Site (US Atomic underground nuclear weapon test facility – for those outside of the USA). He heard it directly from one of his Russian counterparts.

I visited the NTS while conducting research for a proposed very high channel count, low frequency VXI based digitizer Tek was considering. The nuclear weapons reduction treaty in effect at the time was shutting down testing, and the NTS was preparing for their very last test. Per the treaty, Russian test engineers actually were invited to witness the previous test, and a reciprocal visit by the US engineers would occur at their next test.

Much of the technology was declassified and the EG&G were even bragging about the technology used for data capture. The transient digitizers were the latest Tek SCD5000 which had a whopping BW of 5 GHz. This was a big step up from the 3 GHz that was state of the art for nearly a decade before the SCD5000. The Russians were not impressed. They said (and was later verified) that their digitizers had 13 GHz BW. The EG&G engineers questioned, and were told that the Russian units use scan converter CRT technology, with TW deflection, similar to the design Tek used. The difference was the length. While the military specifications for the US digitizers required they fit inside a standard 19” rack with no more than 30” depth. The Russians did not restrict the depth, and used a scan converter that is over 3 m in length! The long distance between the deflection plates and target require very low deflection angle, facilitating higher BW.

The EG&G engineers went on the say what impressed the Russians the most was not the measurement technology, but rather than the NTS used tunnel boring machines which left smooth walls in the test hole. The Russians simply blasted their tunnels with dynamite.


snapdiode
 

I've worked with Russians and really liked their pragmatic approach to things.