Slightly OT: OK Electronics tinyscope


Greg Muir
 

I know that this a wee bit off-topic but I also know that there are a bunch of “tinyscope” people out there who deviate from Tek products purely to experience the Lilliputian world.

Found on ePay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OK-Electronics-10MHz-1010-Portable-Battery-Operated-Oscilloscope-w-Charger/174351418853

Greg


Eric
 

But $257.00 of 10 Mhz?

I'm confused?

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of Greg Muir via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, February 2, 2021 2:55 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Slightly OT: OK Electronics tinyscope

I know that this a wee bit off-topic but I also know that there are a bunch of “tinyscope” people out there who deviate from Tek products purely to experience the Lilliputian world.

Found on ePay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OK-Electronics-10MHz-1010-Portable-Battery-Operated-Oscilloscope-w-Charger/174351418853

Greg


snapdiode
 

I have one. It works, it's cute, but the battery holder is difficult to repair. The plastic cracks and the batteries don't make contact, and trying to find a new holder that fits is harder than it should be.

The auction states "Has been converted to operate from a lithium Rechargeable Battery" which is a good thing.

Whether a 1" CRT single-channel 10MHz scope is worth 250$ is debatable. In a way, I hope it is...


Tom Lee
 

That looks like it uses the same crt as do the NLS scopes (and the Sinclair pocket TV). Cute, but...

Sent from my iThing, so please forgive typos and brevity.

On Feb 2, 2021, at 12:27 PM, snapdiode via groups.io <snapdiode=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I have one. It works, it's cute, but the battery holder is difficult to repair. The plastic cracks and the batteries don't make contact, and trying to find a new holder that fits is harder than it should be.

The auction states "Has been converted to operate from a lithium Rechargeable Battery" which is a good thing.

Whether a 1" CRT single-channel 10MHz scope is worth 250$ is debatable. In a way, I hope it is...





Dave Voorhis
 

On 2 Feb 2021, at 19:54, Greg Muir via groups.io <big_sky_explorer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I know that this a wee bit off-topic but I also know that there are a bunch of “tinyscope” people out there who deviate from Tek products purely to experience the Lilliputian world.

Found on ePay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OK-Electronics-10MHz-1010-Portable-Battery-Operated-Oscilloscope-w-Charger/174351418853
I’ve got one, bought for considerably less on eBay. It’s a fun but not particularly useful gadget, but makes a nice addition to the collection and a notable size contrast when I park it beside my 549.

My Tek 222, which isn’t much bigger, is a much better tool.


Tom Lee
 

You could park it inside your 549, like a shuttlecraft.

Sent from my iThing, so please forgive typos and brevity.

On Feb 2, 2021, at 12:47 PM, Dave Voorhis <voorhis@gmail.com> wrote:

On 2 Feb 2021, at 19:54, Greg Muir via groups.io <big_sky_explorer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I know that this a wee bit off-topic but I also know that there are a bunch of “tinyscope” people out there who deviate from Tek products purely to experience the Lilliputian world.

Found on ePay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OK-Electronics-10MHz-1010-Portable-Battery-Operated-Oscilloscope-w-Charger/174351418853
I’ve got one, bought for considerably less on eBay. It’s a fun but not particularly useful gadget, but makes a nice addition to the collection and a notable size contrast when I park it beside my 549.

My Tek 222, which isn’t much bigger, is a much better tool.





Dave Seiter
 

There's a Star Trek joke waiting to happen, but I'm not feeling particularly witty this afternoon.
-Dave

On Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 12:57:05 PM PST, Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:

You could park it inside your 549, like a shuttlecraft.

Sent from my iThing, so please forgive typos and brevity.

On Feb 2, 2021, at 12:47 PM, Dave Voorhis <voorhis@gmail.com> wrote:

On 2 Feb 2021, at 19:54, Greg Muir via groups.io <big_sky_explorer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I know that this a wee bit off-topic but I also know that there are a bunch of “tinyscope” people out there who deviate from Tek products purely to experience the Lilliputian world.

Found on ePay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OK-Electronics-10MHz-1010-Portable-Battery-Operated-Oscilloscope-w-Charger/174351418853
I’ve got one, bought for considerably less on eBay. It’s a fun but not particularly useful gadget, but makes a nice addition to the collection and a notable size contrast when I park it beside my 549.

My Tek 222, which isn’t much bigger, is a much better tool.





 

On Tue, Feb 2, 2021 at 09:47 PM, Dave Voorhis wrote:


I’ve got one, bought for considerably less on eBay. It’s a fun but not
particularly useful gadget, but makes a nice addition to the collection and a
notable size contrast when I park it beside my 549.

My Tek 222, which isn’t much bigger, is a much better tool.
Don't forget the Tek 221, which besides being smaller than the 222 is analog. I have a fully working 214 (incl. storage) without batteries, a 221 (with intact batteries) and a Li-powered 222 (which easily beats the 221 and 214 in functionality) and find the 214 and 221 much cuter. Next is the Tek 335, which is a serious instrument but is a lot bigger and cannot contain batteries. Still, I find it much cuter than the 222. Must be the digital aspect.

Raymond


Dave Voorhis
 

On 2 Feb 2021, at 20:56, Tom Lee <tomlee@ee.stanford.edu> wrote:

You could park it inside your 549, like a shuttlecraft.

Sent from my iThing, so please forgive typos and brevity.

On Feb 2, 2021, at 12:47 PM, Dave Voorhis <voorhis@gmail.com> wrote:

On 2 Feb 2021, at 19:54, Greg Muir via groups.io <big_sky_explorer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I know that this a wee bit off-topic but I also know that there are a bunch of “tinyscope” people out there who deviate from Tek products purely to experience the Lilliputian world.

Found on ePay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OK-Electronics-10MHz-1010-Portable-Battery-Operated-Oscilloscope-w-Charger/174351418853
I’ve got one, bought for considerably less on eBay. It’s a fun but not particularly useful gadget, but makes a nice addition to the collection and a notable size contrast when I park it beside my 549.

My Tek 222, which isn’t much bigger, is a much better tool.


greenboxmaven
 

I like and collect the tiny scopes and TVs. There is little doubt the Tektronix 2XX series are better than most of the others and tend to have more screen area for the size of the case. I have an NLS, and have seen many other tiny scopes over the years. Most of the others I have seen were made by American companies I had never heard of before or since and were bought with great expectations then quickly relagated to the storage shelf or closet when their limitations were realized. The price on the one offered is beyond all reason for me, but others may be willing. The NLS , Sinclair, and Tektronix tubes are all direct heated, I wonder what their ruggedness and longevity is compared to indirectly heated.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 2/2/21 15:47, Dave Voorhis wrote:
On 2 Feb 2021, at 19:54, Greg Muir via groups.io <big_sky_explorer=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I know that this a wee bit off-topic but I also know that there are a bunch of “tinyscope” people out there who deviate from Tek products purely to experience the Lilliputian world.

Found on ePay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OK-Electronics-10MHz-1010-Portable-Battery-Operated-Oscilloscope-w-Charger/174351418853
I’ve got one, bought for considerably less on eBay. It’s a fun but not particularly useful gadget, but makes a nice addition to the collection and a notable size contrast when I park it beside my 549.

My Tek 222, which isn’t much bigger, is a much better tool.





John Williams
 

Very interesting topic. Please do not forget the 321 and 321A. These while not tiny are certainly small compared to the other scopes of the times. And they offered not only big scope performance but a variety of power sources including internal batteries. I have a dozen of them now, and have forbidden myself from buying any more!


Michael A. Terrell
 

John Williams wrote:
Very interesting topic. Please do not forget the 321 and 321A. These while not tiny are certainly small compared to the other scopes of the times. And they offered not only big scope performance but a variety of power sources including internal batteries. I have a dozen of them now, and have forbidden myself from buying any more!
I have several of both the 323 (5MHz) and 324 (10MHz) Tek scopes.


-
 

I never had a Tiny Scope but I did have one of the small NLS scopes. You
couldn't see much detail on the small CRT but it was still a very handy
piece of gear for simple troubleshooting, Mine disappeared one day and I
never found out what happened to it but I wish that I still had it.

On Tue, Feb 2, 2021 at 2:54 PM Greg Muir via groups.io <big_sky_explorer=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I know that this a wee bit off-topic but I also know that there are a
bunch of “tinyscope” people out there who deviate from Tek products purely
to experience the Lilliputian world.

Found on ePay:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/OK-Electronics-10MHz-1010-Portable-Battery-Operated-Oscilloscope-w-Charger/174351418853

Greg






Greg Muir
 

I remember seeing ads in the trade rags for NLS scopes back in the 70’s. I’m not sure which of the series of manufacturer products introduced during this ears of miniature scopes but do remember that some were made in England and other countries.

Greg


Tom Lee
 

San Diego seemed to attract a disproportionate share of small-scope designers. VuData and NLS were two who went into production. Prior to them was Joe Deavenport (cofounder of Wavetek), whose CK722-based scope (using a 1DP1) was the cover feature of the July 1957 issue of Electrical Design News (later, EDN). It was billed as the world's first transistorized scope. Joe later worked at NLS at some point in his career, so maybe his fondness for small scopes rubbed off on Andy Kay. Joe very kindly gave me his JoeScope, and it is a treasured heirloom. I've never dared to try powering it up.

-- Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 2/2/2021 17:19, Greg Muir via groups.io wrote:
I remember seeing ads in the trade rags for NLS scopes back in the 70’s. I’m not sure which of the series of manufacturer products introduced during this ears of miniature scopes but do remember that some were made in England and other countries.

Greg




snapdiode
 


snapdiode
 


Tom Lee
 

Thanks a lot for those links!

Tom

--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu


stevenhorii
 

Tiny scope thread - I have a NIM (nuclear instrumentation module) that is
an oscilloscope that goes in a NIM bin for power. It uses some small Lemo
coax connectors for the inputs. Unfortunately not working and I have not
had time to work on it and have not been able to find a manual for it. I
had not seen one of these before I found it (surplus). The CRT is about
1.5" diagonal. No idea what the bandwidth is but NIM stuff is designed for
pulse work. When I was working with the nuclear medicine physics guys, an
engineer I worked with put together a complete thyroid scanning system
using NIM modules. It was not very difficult, actually - the scintillator
head, high-voltage supply for the PMT in it, and machinery to move the head
were already there - the Department needed a replacement for the
no-longer-supported electronics. We just had to show the biomed folks that
the leakage current was basically zero and they pronounced it safe to use
on people. The clinical physics guys did their tests of energy
discrimination, count accuracy, thyroid phantom tests, etc. and it passed
their tests also so it could be used for diagnostic work. NIM has some neat
modules if you are working with nuclear instrumentation but things like the
high voltage power supplies, pulse counters, pulse-height discriminators,
coincidence detectors, etc. could be useful in other domains.

On Tue, Feb 2, 2021 at 5:42 PM greenboxmaven via groups.io <ka2ivy=
verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

I like and collect the tiny scopes and TVs. There is little doubt the
Tektronix 2XX series are better than most of the others and tend to have
more screen area for the size of the case. I have an NLS, and have seen
many other tiny scopes over the years. Most of the others I have seen
were made by American companies I had never heard of before or since and
were bought with great expectations then quickly relagated to the
storage shelf or closet when their limitations were realized. The price
on the one offered is beyond all reason for me, but others may be
willing. The NLS , Sinclair, and Tektronix tubes are all direct
heated, I wonder what their ruggedness and longevity is compared to
indirectly heated.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY







On 2/2/21 15:47, Dave Voorhis wrote:
On 2 Feb 2021, at 19:54, Greg Muir via groups.io <big_sky_explorer=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I know that this a wee bit off-topic but I also know that there are a
bunch of “tinyscope” people out there who deviate from Tek products purely
to experience the Lilliputian world.

Found on ePay:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/OK-Electronics-10MHz-1010-Portable-Battery-Operated-Oscilloscope-w-Charger/174351418853
I’ve got one, bought for considerably less on eBay. It’s a fun but not
particularly useful gadget, but makes a nice addition to the collection and
a notable size contrast when I park it beside my 549.

My Tek 222, which isn’t much bigger, is a much better tool.











Michael A. Terrell
 

stevenhorii wrote:
Tiny scope thread - I have a NIM (nuclear instrumentation module) that is
an oscilloscope that goes in a NIM bin for power. It uses some small Lemo
coax connectors for the inputs. Unfortunately not working and I have not
had time to work on it and have not been able to find a manual for it. I
had not seen one of these before I found it (surplus). The CRT is about
1.5" diagonal. No idea what the bandwidth is but NIM stuff is designed for
pulse work. When I was working with the nuclear medicine physics guys, an
engineer I worked with put together a complete thyroid scanning system
using NIM modules. It was not very difficult, actually - the scintillator
head, high-voltage supply for the PMT in it, and machinery to move the head
were already there - the Department needed a replacement for the
no-longer-supported electronics. We just had to show the biomed folks that
the leakage current was basically zero and they pronounced it safe to use
on people. The clinical physics guys did their tests of energy
discrimination, count accuracy, thyroid phantom tests, etc. and it passed
their tests also so it could be used for diagnostic work. NIM has some neat
modules if you are working with nuclear instrumentation but things like the
high voltage power supplies, pulse counters, pulse-height discriminators,
coincidence detectors, etc. could be useful in other domains.
James Millen made maybe the first, and smallest scope ever sold. Here are some photos from a collector. It is about the size of a panel meter of the era that it was sold. These were advertised in the ARRL handbook, for many years.

<http://radioheaven.homestead.com/Tiny_Millen_OScope.html>