Comments from Peter Keller on the 500 Series Scopes


 

Since Sunday when I picked up 106 of Peter Keller's books we have spoken by
phone. During our conversation Peter mentioned a few things I thought I
should pass along since I thought he may have reached the wrong conclusion
from his brief time as a member of TekScopes.

Peter was disappointed that there didn't seem to be much interest in the 500
series of oscilloscopes. I thought it might be nice if Peter heard from how
many TekScopes members have 500 series scopes and what you like most about
your favorite model.

* Peter and I both agree that the pinnacle of the 500 series was the 547. I
was in love with the first one I got to use in 1967 shortly after it was
introduced. That was a fabulous scope!
* We both agree the 500 series was known worldwide for the incredibly tiny
CRT spot size.
* Peter felt the 500 series was the last scope anyone could fix since it
didn't use many specialized parts. I disagree about this because I have
spent years troubleshooting and repairing 7000 series plugins and
mainframes. Tektronix' fabulous documentation makes it just as easy to fix
these 7000 scopes as it does to fix the 500 series but that it just my
opinion.

From the volume of posts we receive it may appear that there is more
interest in the some of the portables but that is because they are so often
broken, replacement parts are impossible to find, they use a lot of surface
mount and custom parts, and Tek stopped providing Circuit Descriptions,
Parts Lists, and schematics to assist in calibrating and repairing them.

Dennis Tillman W7pF


Tom Lee
 

Well, as the proud owner of a 541, 545, 547, 585 and several other 500-series scopes, I can say that the relatively low volume of posts might be attributable to how relatively simple they are to repair. SOS's are transmitted fairly rarely, as the most common ailments (and their cures) seem to be well documented at tekwiki and other places.

My 547 has a special place of honor in my home lab. For years I'd been on the lookout for one here in the Valley, but I could not find any other than stripped hulks that weren't worth hauling home as parts queens. The rumor was that Jim Williams had picked up all the good ones. At one of the eFleas here, I teased him about the rumor. He was shocked that I did not have a 547. So right after the eFlea, he had me follow him to Linear and then to his famous bench. Hidden underneath a huge tangle of cables was a dusty but otherwise pristine 547. "If you can liberate it from that mess, it's yours." Quite a guy he was, and quite a scope it still is. The jug's electron optics are impressive. Every time I fire it up, I'm reminded of exquisite engineering, and of Jim's kindness.

--Tom


--
Prof. Thomas H. Lee
Allen Ctr., Rm. 205
350 Jane Stanford Way
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-4070
http://www-smirc.stanford.edu

On 12/23/2020 11:47, Dennis Tillman W7pF wrote:
Since Sunday when I picked up 106 of Peter Keller's books we have spoken by
phone. During our conversation Peter mentioned a few things I thought I
should pass along since I thought he may have reached the wrong conclusion
from his brief time as a member of TekScopes.

Peter was disappointed that there didn't seem to be much interest in the 500
series of oscilloscopes. I thought it might be nice if Peter heard from how
many TekScopes members have 500 series scopes and what you like most about
your favorite model.

* Peter and I both agree that the pinnacle of the 500 series was the 547. I
was in love with the first one I got to use in 1967 shortly after it was
introduced. That was a fabulous scope!
* We both agree the 500 series was known worldwide for the incredibly tiny
CRT spot size.
* Peter felt the 500 series was the last scope anyone could fix since it
didn't use many specialized parts. I disagree about this because I have
spent years troubleshooting and repairing 7000 series plugins and
mainframes. Tektronix' fabulous documentation makes it just as easy to fix
these 7000 scopes as it does to fix the 500 series but that it just my
opinion.

From the volume of posts we receive it may appear that there is more
interest in the some of the portables but that is because they are so often
broken, replacement parts are impossible to find, they use a lot of surface
mount and custom parts, and Tek stopped providing Circuit Descriptions,
Parts Lists, and schematics to assist in calibrating and repairing them.

Dennis Tillman W7pF




Jokken Feldhaar
 

Hi all,

I own a small herd of 5xx scopes, starting with a 567, more than 30
years ago. To me, one of the most fascinating reads on this planet is
the patent bunch on the 54x and 58x series, the name John Kobbe stands
out to me. Reading his description of the vertical chain amplifier and
the termination was like reading a thriller by Grisham, likewise. I
admire the knowledge and superb engineering that has gone into these
scopes. If I have a question about these scopes, this group is my
resource for maintaining these fine instruments!

Cheers, Jochen DH6FAZ

Am 23.12.2020 um 20:47 schrieb Dennis Tillman W7pF:

Since Sunday when I picked up 106 of Peter Keller's books we have spoken by
phone. During our conversation Peter mentioned a few things I thought I
should pass along since I thought he may have reached the wrong conclusion
from his brief time as a member of TekScopes.

Peter was disappointed that there didn't seem to be much interest in the 500
series of oscilloscopes. I thought it might be nice if Peter heard from how
many TekScopes members have 500 series scopes and what you like most about
your favorite model.

* Peter and I both agree that the pinnacle of the 500 series was the 547. I
was in love with the first one I got to use in 1967 shortly after it was
introduced. That was a fabulous scope!
* We both agree the 500 series was known worldwide for the incredibly tiny
CRT spot size.
* Peter felt the 500 series was the last scope anyone could fix since it
didn't use many specialized parts. I disagree about this because I have
spent years troubleshooting and repairing 7000 series plugins and
mainframes. Tektronix' fabulous documentation makes it just as easy to fix
these 7000 scopes as it does to fix the 500 series but that it just my
opinion.

From the volume of posts we receive it may appear that there is more
interest in the some of the portables but that is because they are so often
broken, replacement parts are impossible to find, they use a lot of surface
mount and custom parts, and Tek stopped providing Circuit Descriptions,
Parts Lists, and schematics to assist in calibrating and repairing them.

Dennis Tillman W7pF




Timothy W. Koeth
 

Hi Dennis and All,

My Tek scope inventory at home exceeds 100 instruments. About half are of
the 500 series. Off the top of my head, I know the following are in my
collection.

three 310,
one 317,
two 502,
three RM503
one RM15
one 513,
one 514,
three 519,
two 535s,
one 536,
one 541,
one 545,
four 547s
one 549,
four 555,
three 556s
one RM564B,
one 575,
two 576,
one 577,
(and more...)
(and lots of 7000 series too)

Around 50% of these are operating and in cal.

It is funny that you mention the 547 specifically, it is certainly a superb
instrument. I have four that are my "winter projects," one has just been
overhauled and is now in fine working condition. The next one is on the
operating table as we speak... I've solved both time base A and B
unblanking issues (bad 2N2207s), and now troubleshooting an intensity
flickering issue that appears about 10 minutes after turn on... After that
one, two more to go. One was plucked of all its tubes, so it might be just
fine once repopulated.

A 547 testimonial: In March of 2018, Dr. Don Edwards, the husband of my
late PhD advisor (Dr. Helen Edwards) was in town and visited my house. He
also is an accelerator physicist, active at Cornell in the 1950s and 60's
before moving to the "National Accelerator Lab" (Fermilab) in Batavia IL in
1969. During his visit, I gave him a tour of my basement, and of all the
wonders it contains, Don (90 years old at the time) immediately gravitated
to the 547 sitting on a cart in the corner and exclaimed "You have a
547!?!?" To which I replied "No, I have three" Ahahahah, he was stunned,
and could not get over his 1960's mindset of that being the most coveted
oscilloscope. "You know, that is a very good oscilloscope," he chided. He
went on to tell me about how excited he was when his lab finally got one!
(For comparison, he was totally unimpressed by my collection of 7104s). I
knew that the 547s were good instruments, but that March day, they became
extra special to me.

Of course, I personally really like the 500 series scopes, I use them when
I can. For work (and for fun) I do a lot of single shot pulsed work (HV
and nuclear signals), so it is tough not to use a digital scope.
Nevertheless, if it is really something cool, that "deserves" to be
displayed on a CRT, I make the effort to capture the signal with a
photograph - this gives me perspective of the previous generations of
nuclear physicists and the tools they had to work with. For example, the
header photograph of this page of my basement measurement of the muon
lifetime starts of with the 555 P-11 phosphor image of the "capture and
death" signature of a muon:

http://www.nuclearphysicslab.com/npl/npl-home/experiments/muons/muon-lifetime-measurment/

An unreasonable amount of time was put into setting up the timing just to
display this on the 555 - but it was worth it!

I should post some photos of my "equipement pool."

73,
Tim


Dr. Timothy Koeth
Assistant Professor
Material Science & Engineering
Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics
University of Maryland
301-405-4952 (office)
609-577-8790 (cell)

https://mse.umd.edu/clark/faculty/676/Timothy-W-Koeth

radiation.umd.edu

Amateur radio call sign K0ETH "K-zero-ETH" (formerly N2LPN)


On Wed, Dec 23, 2020 at 2:47 PM Dennis Tillman W7pF <dennis@ridesoft.com>
wrote:

Since Sunday when I picked up 106 of Peter Keller's books we have spoken by
phone. During our conversation Peter mentioned a few things I thought I
should pass along since I thought he may have reached the wrong conclusion
from his brief time as a member of TekScopes.

Peter was disappointed that there didn't seem to be much interest in the
500
series of oscilloscopes. I thought it might be nice if Peter heard from how
many TekScopes members have 500 series scopes and what you like most about
your favorite model.

* Peter and I both agree that the pinnacle of the 500 series was the 547. I
was in love with the first one I got to use in 1967 shortly after it was
introduced. That was a fabulous scope!
* We both agree the 500 series was known worldwide for the incredibly tiny
CRT spot size.
* Peter felt the 500 series was the last scope anyone could fix since it
didn't use many specialized parts. I disagree about this because I have
spent years troubleshooting and repairing 7000 series plugins and
mainframes. Tektronix' fabulous documentation makes it just as easy to fix
these 7000 scopes as it does to fix the 500 series but that it just my
opinion.

From the volume of posts we receive it may appear that there is more
interest in the some of the portables but that is because they are so often
broken, replacement parts are impossible to find, they use a lot of surface
mount and custom parts, and Tek stopped providing Circuit Descriptions,
Parts Lists, and schematics to assist in calibrating and repairing them.

Dennis Tillman W7pF






Dave Wise
 

535, 545, 535A, 547. The 535 and 545 are daily runners; I should swap periodically.
B, C, CA, D, G, H, K, L, O, Z, 1A1, 1A2, 1A4, 1A5, 1A7, 1L5, 1S1, TU-7.

Dave Wise in Hillsboro Oregon
________________________________________
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> on behalf of Dennis Tillman W7pF via groups.io <dennis=ridesoft.com@groups.io>
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2020 11:47 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Comments from Peter Keller on the 500 Series Scopes

Since Sunday when I picked up 106 of Peter Keller's books we have spoken by
phone. During our conversation Peter mentioned a few things I thought I
should pass along since I thought he may have reached the wrong conclusion
from his brief time as a member of TekScopes.

Peter was disappointed that there didn't seem to be much interest in the 500
series of oscilloscopes. I thought it might be nice if Peter heard from how
many TekScopes members have 500 series scopes and what you like most about
your favorite model.

* Peter and I both agree that the pinnacle of the 500 series was the 547. I
was in love with the first one I got to use in 1967 shortly after it was
introduced. That was a fabulous scope!
* We both agree the 500 series was known worldwide for the incredibly tiny
CRT spot size.
* Peter felt the 500 series was the last scope anyone could fix since it
didn't use many specialized parts. I disagree about this because I have
spent years troubleshooting and repairing 7000 series plugins and
mainframes. Tektronix' fabulous documentation makes it just as easy to fix
these 7000 scopes as it does to fix the 500 series but that it just my
opinion.

From the volume of posts we receive it may appear that there is more
interest in the some of the portables but that is because they are so often
broken, replacement parts are impossible to find, they use a lot of surface
mount and custom parts, and Tek stopped providing Circuit Descriptions,
Parts Lists, and schematics to assist in calibrating and repairing them.

Dennis Tillman W7pF


Paul Amaranth
 

I have a 555 that followed me home just because it's an
iconic scope and I couldn't bear the thought of it going
for scrap or the tube harvesters.

I'll get to it one of these winters (at 1KW it's a little
much for working on in the summers).

I think nobody talks about them much since repair is pretty
straightforward; there's no esoteric technology that you
have to work around. All you need is some 2-3% silver solder
and you're good to go.

Paul

--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Manchester MI, USA
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC | Security, Systems & Software
paul@AuroraGrp.Com | Unix/Linux - We don't do windows


Randy Newman
 

Hi Dennis.
I’d be glad to pass on to Peter my thoughts about 500 series scopes. I have
a nearly pristine 555 on a Tek scope cart, and have a few plugins ( CA (2),
D, W, and a 1A7 I purchased from Stan Griffiths a few years back.). Mine
has the bluish phosphor for high speed photography, and a very sharp trace.
I’ve used a fair number of Tek scopes during my career, from 565’s early on
as a wee engineer, to 7000 series, 11000 series, and some of the recent 8
GHz DSA series. I still love my 555. I also own 3 other 7k scopes, which
are very nice, but certainly do not Have the classic-factor of the 555. I
share the sentiment of the late Jim Williams, who stated that the Tek
scopes of the 500 series era were designed in a unique period of time which
drove their development, and which will not agin occur.

Randy

On Wed, Dec 23, 2020 at 11:47 AM Dennis Tillman W7pF <dennis@ridesoft.com>
wrote:

Since Sunday when I picked up 106 of Peter Keller's books we have spoken by
phone. During our conversation Peter mentioned a few things I thought I
should pass along since I thought he may have reached the wrong conclusion
from his brief time as a member of TekScopes.

Peter was disappointed that there didn't seem to be much interest in the
500
series of oscilloscopes. I thought it might be nice if Peter heard from how
many TekScopes members have 500 series scopes and what you like most about
your favorite model.

* Peter and I both agree that the pinnacle of the 500 series was the 547. I
was in love with the first one I got to use in 1967 shortly after it was
introduced. That was a fabulous scope!
* We both agree the 500 series was known worldwide for the incredibly tiny
CRT spot size.
* Peter felt the 500 series was the last scope anyone could fix since it
didn't use many specialized parts. I disagree about this because I have
spent years troubleshooting and repairing 7000 series plugins and
mainframes. Tektronix' fabulous documentation makes it just as easy to fix
these 7000 scopes as it does to fix the 500 series but that it just my
opinion.

From the volume of posts we receive it may appear that there is more
interest in the some of the portables but that is because they are so often
broken, replacement parts are impossible to find, they use a lot of surface
mount and custom parts, and Tek stopped providing Circuit Descriptions,
Parts Lists, and schematics to assist in calibrating and repairing them.

Dennis Tillman W7pF






TomC
 

On 12/23/2020 12:39 PM, Timothy W. Koeth wrote:
For example, the
header photograph of this page of my basement measurement of the muon
lifetime starts of with the 555 P-11 phosphor image of the "capture and
death" signature of a muon:
http://www.nuclearphysicslab.com/npl/npl-home/experiments/muons/muon-lifetime-measurment/
An unreasonable amount of time was put into setting up the timing just to
display this on the 555 - but it was worth it!
Tim, that's a great photo. Especially striking with the blue phosphor and red graticule.

Tom


Roy Thistle
 

Hi All:
I always thought the 500 fan club were "triple nickle" nuts... and would trade their grandma for a 585. You know: the 555 pushing 50 Kg (more with the cart) and blowing out 1200W (virtually all heat, for the cold winter days in the garage.)... what's not to love?
I know where there are two 555s... one guy doesn't even know it needs a power supply. The other... like many of these 500s still left relatively un-violated is using it to hold down the basement floor, and for propping up one corner of the laundry tub.
Lately, there's been some "talk" about 547s, frames, and plug-ins. Watch the prices rise... and if Dave Jones gets a hold of one... watch the prices sky rocket.


Gordon Smith
 

If anyone is looking for a 547 in the Reno, NV area, there is one on Craigslist with 1A4 plug in and probe. The current owner claims that it works and has pictures. Other than a hacked fan install, looks legit. Link is here: https://reno.craigslist.org/for/d/genoa-1969-tektronix-547-with-1a4/7235767411.html

No financial interest/connection, just passing along. If I was closer, I'd seriously consider it just for the plugin and probe.

Thank You, Gordon


Roy Thistle
 

On Wed, Dec 23, 2020 at 01:12 PM, Randy Newman wrote:


since it
didn't use many specialized parts.
"silver solder", ceramic terminal strips, any and all vacuum tubes... and lots of em, storage CRTs, just CRTs, kilowatt multi-tap power transformers, selenium rectifiers, thermal relay vacuum tubes, neon bulbs, multi-kilovolt flyback transformers, canned Al electrolytic capacitors, resin knobs...
The locals tell me Radio Trade Supply has be gone for 40 years... and my time machine is broken.


Dave Voorhis
 

On 23 Dec 2020, at 22:04, someone wrote:

"silver solder", ceramic terminal strips, any and all vacuum tubes... and lots of em, storage CRTs, just CRTs, kilowatt multi-tap power transformers, selenium rectifiers, thermal relay vacuum tubes, neon bulbs, multi-kilovolt flyback transformers, canned Al electrolytic capacitors, resin knobs...
The locals tell me Radio Trade Supply has be gone for 40 years... and my time machine is broken.
Well, yeah.

I love my 549 with 1A2, 1A4 and Type Z plugins. In terms of capabilities its arguably bested by even the 7623 — almost the same age — beside it, but as a working piece of electronics history, it's a marvel and a sheer delight to use in a way that more modern gear is not.


Greg Muir
 

Have:

(2) Tek 502
(1) Tek 541A
(4) Tek 547
(1) Tek 549
(1) Tek 555
(1) Tek 575
(1) Tek 585 w/type 81 adapter (when required)

Plus a raft of plug-ins too numerous to mention at this time as well as scope carts for most of them.

Had a couple of 511s tucked away somewhere but I’ll be darned if I can locate them right now.

Obviously my legacy choice is the 547. For “blazing” speed (heh) I rely on the 585.

Was actually “raised” on a Tek 524 at the local television station when I was 14 years old back in the 60’s. Never saw the worth of looking at other manufacturers oscilloscopes after the experience of using a scope that performed so well. The crisp triggering really impressed me. But that was also in the era when other scope manufacturers were still using "sync" triggering a lot.

I guess you could say that first Tek experience was what started me on my Tek scope hobby of today.

Greg


snapdiode
 

I have a 547 with many plugins like the Type O, 1A1, 1A2, 1A5, 1A7, four 1S1's with accessories like P6032, Type 281 ans 282, four 1S2's.

I have a 531 but it is in pitiful condition, it was used by a cigar smoker before and it is coated in tar inside and out.

A 567 with 6R1A and a complement of sampling heads like S-1, S-2, S-3, S-4, S-52, S-6 and S-42.

And a box of stuff like those little epoxy bead 10mA tunnel diodes and Tek matched Nuvistors.

I also have a Type 132 power supply.


John Williams
 

Hello and happy holidays to you all.

I have to agree with Peter that interest in 500 series scopes is declining. But I also have to say of course it is. Most of us who would have used them are also declining. Just like interest in other things that have been replaced by new technology such as collecting film cameras, mechanical toys and stamps. Even the crt color tv and computer monitors are gone. Remember DEC and Data General? Not only are the companies gone, but the entire minicomputer industry is history.

However there has been a lot of good interest in the old scopes since I started collecting them. Peter’s book is just one example. Vintage Tek, Tekwiki, and the Tek museum all came to be since then. I would say that few people in the industry would ever consider using a tube scope, most don’t even know that they exist. I often wonder what my wife will do with all this stuff once I am gone.

As far as the ones I have, I lost count a long time ago. Here is the link to my pictures, please count them for me.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/rv7WNBPM61PsdLpj7


Dave Seiter
 

My first Tek scope was a working 502 I picked up at the Foothill fleamarket in about '79.  I had a Heathkit or Eico previously, and the 502 was so much better!  I spent endless hours just playing around with it, and used it to troubleshoot the early Commodore computers I built from dumpster parts. (It was a real testament to it's design that it could just barely trigger at the PCs frequencies (1MHz CLK), more or less!)  
Of the 80 or so scopes I have, the 500 series are:
502 (still have it!)R502511A514AD519 (3, including a 519 scopemobile)535 (I think- it's an old basket case)541545547 (2)RM547RM35A549551555575 (2- not scopes, but the same style & quality)
I love the narrow traces, the intuitive layout and the overall quality.  I have seen a few for sale locally in the past two years, but nothing I "needed".  One was a 536 for $20, but I was out of room at the time, and didn't need an XY scope.  Another was a 535 w/lots of plugins, but it had lived in a damp environment for years- there was a white corrosion film covering everything. As I was weighing my options, someone else snagged it.
-Dave

On Wednesday, December 23, 2020, 11:47:27 AM PST, Dennis Tillman W7pF <dennis@ridesoft.com> wrote:
Peter was disappointed that there didn't seem to be much interest in the 500
series of oscilloscopes. I thought it might be nice if Peter heard from how
many TekScopes members have 500 series scopes and what you like most about
your favorite model.


Shaun M
 

Folks,

Best of the Season to everyone,

Just as a counterpoise to John's message, I have a big stable of old TEK CRT gear waiting to be restore and I am just about to retire from my day job (Materials Eng). I am relatively young (Apollo kid) so that I never encountered Tek CRT gear in my day job, but recognized the pedigree when I saw it.

Film cameras, well there is a specialty. I still shoot MF B&W and do my own developing. In fact I can claim some little expertise in chemistry and scanning, with taming high contrast films like TechPan and ATP 1.1 to produce wonderful prints.

So it will be over someday, but not today.

Shaun M

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of John Williams
Sent: Wednesday, December 23, 2020 20:54
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Comments from Peter Keller on the 500 Series Scopes

Hello and happy holidays to you all.

I have to agree with Peter that interest in 500 series scopes is declining. But I also have to say of course it is. Most of us who would have used them are also declining. Just like interest in other things that have been replaced by new technology such as collecting film cameras, mechanical toys and stamps. Even the crt color tv and computer monitors are gone. Remember DEC and Data General? Not only are the companies gone, but the entire minicomputer industry is history.

However there has been a lot of good interest in the old scopes since I started collecting them. Peter's book is just one example. Vintage Tek, Tekwiki, and the Tek museum all came to be since then. I would say that few people in the industry would ever consider using a tube scope, most don't even know that they exist. I often wonder what my wife will do with all this stuff once I am gone.

As far as the ones I have, I lost count a long time ago. Here is the link to my pictures, please count them for me.

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fphotos.app.goo.gl%2Frv7WNBPM61PsdLpj7&;data=04%7C01%7C%7C69c51ac937724a58c6d608d8a7bf90cd%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637443788513925330%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&amp;sdata=MdXB2FyzRTqq1JhWTmBSHLjYU5ym0Qe2nfMIKWJ60rU%3D&amp;reserved=0


Morris Odell
 

My experience down here in Australia is very similar to some others although Tek scopes were never as easy to find as in the USA. The first one I ever saw whan I was a teenager in the 1960s was a 549 with a 4 trace plugin (M or 1A4). At that time I had a home made scope with a 5BP1 and gas tube timebase so the 549 was something absolutely amazing. The first Tek I owned was a 502 which I still have but haven't used for a long time. I've had many 500 series since including 524, 529, 531, 533, 541, 547, 549, 555, 556, 575, 581, 519 and a good selection of plugins and spare parts. I've never been into the 560 series. Some of the scopes have been given away over the years but I've still got quite a few including both double beam scoposaurii and the 519 in the unlikely event that I want to do some weird stuff ;-). At the moment my main bench scope is a 547/1A4 with a 7603 and 7834 available for use as the need arises.

The 547/1A4 really is a wonderful piece of industrial art, a pleasure to use and still exceptional even after 50 years. It's also easily repairable compared to more modern instruments. I cherish it every time I turn it on and consider myself very fortunate to have one.

Morris VK3DOC


bobkrassa
 

The number of posts in recent years may not adequately represent the interest in 500 series scopes, because anyone who is aware of this group would search the messages before posting a question and would be very likely to find a comprehensive answer. This group is a tremendous resource!

Also, thanks to Dennis for everything you do!

Bob Krassa AC0JL


Arne Buck
 

There's a fellow here in Newton MA with an amazing collection of cars,
particularly tiny "Mini and Micro <https://www.bubbledrome.org/index2.html>"
cars, and sponsors a wonderful weekend culminating at the Larz Anderson
Transportation Mvsevm in Brookline MA. Many restored, many more not so,
each category stored in its own warehouse. He is wont to say, "I have this
nightmare in which I've died and my wife sells all my cars for what I told
her I paid for them."