Tek blue (and gray) paint


stevenhorii
 

I just found a seller on eBay who has some cans of Tek blue (and a can of
old Tek gray) paint:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Tektronix-spray-paint-Tek-blue/184184194077

I bought a couple of cans. I figured the rest would also go quickly.

Steve Horii


victor.silva
 

I have some cans of Tek Blue that matches the 24xx series perfectly.
I posted a message it before.

I wonder if these can still be purchase given the information on the label?

It is Krylon OMNI-PAK MasterBlend EZ TOUCH <- This is the generic can for custom paints.

Specific blend is on a label which reads:

L61 Opex Lacquer
L61XXL42-4383
TEK BLUE
09/26/05


 

I ordered some of the spray paint from the eBay seller, but he had to cancel my order today because he can't find a shipper who will handle aerosol spray paint. I was a little worried about this when I made the order. I know that USPS won't handle such things, and I was worried that UPS and FedEx might balk (which, apparently they have).

I am going to investigate UPS ground and FedEx this week, to see if there is any way to ship these items, but the seller didn't sound optimistic.

-- Jeff Dutky


Dave Casey
 

I would think UPS Ground would take it, just as they do Lithium batteries.

Dave Casey

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 12:28 AM Jeff Dutky <jeff.dutky@gmail.com> wrote:

I ordered some of the spray paint from the eBay seller, but he had to
cancel my order today because he can't find a shipper who will handle
aerosol spray paint. I was a little worried about this when I made the
order. I know that USPS won't handle such things, and I was worried that
UPS and FedEx might balk (which, apparently they have).

I am going to investigate UPS ground and FedEx this week, to see if there
is any way to ship these items, but the seller didn't sound optimistic.

-- Jeff Dutky






 

Dave Casey wrote:

I would think UPS Ground would take it, just as they do Lithium batteries.
I would have thought that too, and the seller seemed to expect that as well, but his impression was that they were refusing to ship aerosol cans during the pandemic. Whatever the case I will find out this week, as I plan to call both UPS and FedEx to verify what their current policies are.

-- Jeff Dutky


Jean-Paul
 

Hi there Nothing to do with the Virus, the regs are worse ever year as prices rise on shipping anything.

All common carriers Post/Fed/UP have tightened restrictions in recent years, eg Li batts, Haz mat, chemicals, and Aerosol.

Blame the liability lawyers.


Suggest to take the numbers on the can, check with a Pan-tone book, and get a custom (NON aerosol) mix at a good paint store.

Of course, it must be an oil based lacquer, so many jurisdictions (EG all of Claif) will prohibit due to VOC.

Will they ever just let us be to do our work?

Jon


Colin Herbert
 

One wonders how any of this stuff gets to retail outlets, presumably by the manufacturing company itself?
Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jean-Paul
Sent: 08 December 2020 16:36
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek blue (and gray) paint

Hi there Nothing to do with the Virus, the regs are worse ever year as prices rise on shipping anything.

All common carriers Post/Fed/UP have tightened restrictions in recent years, eg Li batts, Haz mat, chemicals, and Aerosol.

Blame the liability lawyers.


Suggest to take the numbers on the can, check with a Pan-tone book, and get a custom (NON aerosol) mix at a good paint store.

Of course, it must be an oil based lacquer, so many jurisdictions (EG all of Claif) will prohibit due to VOC.

Will they ever just let us be to do our work?

Jon


Dave Casey
 

On a pallet in the back of an 18-wheeler either belonging to the
distribution company itself or a contracted freight carrier.

Dave Casey

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 11:26 AM Colin Herbert via groups.io <colingherbert=
blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

One wonders how any of this stuff gets to retail outlets, presumably by
the manufacturing company itself?
Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jean-Paul
Sent: 08 December 2020 16:36
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek blue (and gray) paint

Hi there Nothing to do with the Virus, the regs are worse ever year as
prices rise on shipping anything.

All common carriers Post/Fed/UP have tightened restrictions in recent
years, eg Li batts, Haz mat, chemicals, and Aerosol.

Blame the liability lawyers.


Suggest to take the numbers on the can, check with a Pan-tone book, and
get a custom (NON aerosol) mix at a good paint store.

Of course, it must be an oil based lacquer, so many jurisdictions (EG all
of Claif) will prohibit due to VOC.

Will they ever just let us be to do our work?

Jon












Dan Abell
 

It’s not liability lawyers in this case, it’s a safety issue for, in particular, air carriers. Yes I know this because I was responsible for hazardous materials on my aircraft in USAF.
Dan w3dka


greenboxmaven
 

In the USA, you can check with Fastenall stores. Many of them do accept frieght for movement from one of their stores to another. They sell many aerosol products, including paint, so carrying a few cans of paint should not be an issue. I have not had any problem ordering aerosols and liquid products in the last few months, or lithium batteries, as long as they were labeled and shipped by ground.

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY.

On 12/8/20 12:28, Dave Casey wrote:
On a pallet in the back of an 18-wheeler either belonging to the
distribution company itself or a contracted freight carrier.

Dave Casey

On Tue, Dec 8, 2020 at 11:26 AM Colin Herbert via groups.io <colingherbert=
blueyonder.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:

One wonders how any of this stuff gets to retail outlets, presumably by
the manufacturing company itself?
Colin.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jean-Paul
Sent: 08 December 2020 16:36
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek blue (and gray) paint

Hi there Nothing to do with the Virus, the regs are worse ever year as
prices rise on shipping anything.

All common carriers Post/Fed/UP have tightened restrictions in recent
years, eg Li batts, Haz mat, chemicals, and Aerosol.

Blame the liability lawyers.


Suggest to take the numbers on the can, check with a Pan-tone book, and
get a custom (NON aerosol) mix at a good paint store.

Of course, it must be an oil based lacquer, so many jurisdictions (EG all
of Claif) will prohibit due to VOC.

Will they ever just let us be to do our work?

Jon














victor.silva
 

I thought UPS Ground could do it if you listed it as hazardous material and stuck on an ORM-D label.
It looks like only contract haz mat shippers can do that.
Possibly a UPS Store can do it. Be prepared to pay as UPS stores are privately run and charge whatever they feel like.

--Victor


SCMenasian
 

FedEx Ground will handle hazardous materials. I just shipped a cylinder of Freon 12 to a company which destroys it. (one pound of R12 is equivalent to 5 tons of CO2 if it escapes to the atmosphere.) The company buys it and goes through the regulatory hoops to get it destroyed. They get the Carbon offset credit for their effort and costs. They arranged the shipment and supplied a shipping container, complete with HAZMAT labels and FedEx prepaid label. The tracking number had lots of digits (21, I think). I'm sure it cost a fortune to ship. I took it to the only FedEx location in my area (Allentown, PA) which would take it - off by the airport in a huge building, not normally used by retail customers. The shipment went like a charm once I found the building.


Stephen Hanselman
 

Off topic but can you please PM me the name of that company? I have 2 3/4 full R-12 and one 1/2 full R-22 I would like to recycle.

Thanks

Kc4sw at kc4sw dot com

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of SCMenasian
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 11:59 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek blue (and gray) paint

FedEx Ground will handle hazardous materials. I just shipped a cylinder of Freon 12 to a company which destroys it. (one pound of R12 is equivalent to 5 tons of CO2 if it escapes to the atmosphere.) The company buys it and goes through the regulatory hoops to get it destroyed. They get the Carbon offset credit for their effort and costs. They arranged the shipment and supplied a shipping container, complete with HAZMAT labels and FedEx prepaid label. The tracking number had lots of digits (21, I think). I'm sure it cost a fortune to ship. I took it to the only FedEx location in my area (Allentown, PA) which would take it - off by the airport in a huge building, not normally used by retail customers. The shipment went like a charm once I found the building.


kim.herron@sbcglobal.net
 

Sent from my alcatel Fierce 4
On Dec 8, 2020 3:59 PM, Stephen Hanselman <kc4sw.io@kc4sw.com> wrote:


Off topic but can you please PM me the name of that company?  I have 2 3/4 full R-12 and one 1/2 full R-22 I would like to recycle.

Thanks

Kc4sw  at  kc4sw  dot com

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of SCMenasian
Sent: Tuesday, December 8, 2020 11:59 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek blue (and gray) paint

FedEx Ground will handle hazardous materials. I just shipped a cylinder of Freon 12 to a company which destroys it.  (one pound of R12 is equivalent to 5 tons of CO2 if it escapes to the atmosphere.) The company buys it and goes through the regulatory hoops to get it destroyed. They get the Carbon offset credit for their effort and costs. They arranged the shipment and supplied a shipping container, complete with HAZMAT labels and FedEx prepaid label. The tracking number had lots of digits (21, I think). I'm sure it cost a fortune to ship. I took it to the only FedEx location in my area (Allentown, PA) which would take it - off by the airport in a huge building, not normally used by retail customers. The shipment went like a charm once I found the building.










Just an observation here.  Both those refrigerants are still of use and needed.  The classic car people can't convert old cars to use new refrigerants. I know of what I speak.  My AC systems here at the shop and home use R-22.  I'm thinking others would be better served to put that stuff in the hands of people who NEED it.  Destruction of those supplies seems, shall I say, inconsiderate and counterproductive.  We get upset when our old test gear gets scrapped for tubes and metals.  This seems like the same thing to me.


Keith
 

Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Probably most every guy on this forum has fixed more tech scopes than I have (I only have four scopes and a curve tracer at the moment.) But I’m willing to bet that I’ve shot more lacquer over the past thirty years than any five of you guys combined, 🙂...so a couple of thoughts here that may help.

First, you really are making this way too hard. Lacquer is still about as common as dirt, and not a problem to ship. You just have to know where to look and how to ask for it. If you want to buy online, try TCP Global. Heck, they even show TEK Blue under their standard “appliance finishes”. You can get it by the quart in everything from lacquer to acrylic enamel to urethane single stage to urethane base coat clear combos...In other words any finish type you ever would really want to try using! 🙂 I admit that $149-179 a quart is a little pricey, but hey it’s for our HOBBY, right? 😂 ...and you can paint quite a few scope covers with a quart of lacquer.

Second - You have a good formula someone else posted here. Take that to any decent local automotive paint store and they can generally mix what you want.

Third - if the local paint shop can’t figure out or mix the original Tek formula, first take a little rubbing compound to that extra Tek scope cover to shed the oxidation, and then take it to a paint shop with a scanner. (They too are about as common as dirt.) Have them shoot five samples and average them. You will get really close and really it will be fine...because you are going to paint the whole cover, right?

Fourth - again, I love lacquer and I have shot it a lot - but IF I were choosing to go this route, I believe I would skip the lacquer fuss and just use a single stage urethane. It is just so much more durable and not that fussy.

Fifth - if shooting your own is just too hard, fine. Get the paint and take it to a local auto body shop friend. Do your own removal of the original Tek paint. Bring a clean, ready to shoot piece and your own paint and have him shoot it. Not rocket science here...and WAY easier than repairing the broken A5 board on a 2465b, for example 🤓

Sixth, and just from my eyeballs looking at my various Tek scope covers, I believe I would drop a little flatting agent in there as well. Maybe 15-20%? Without flatting agent, these finishes are going to be way too glossy.

Seventh and finally - there is no such thing as “oil based lacquer”. That’s enamel. No oil in lacquer, or you will be really really sorry when you spray it.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.


greenboxmaven
 

What type of paint was the original finish? How was the texture achieved?

Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY

On 12/9/20 8:38, Keith wrote:
Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.





Chuck Harris <cfharris@...>
 

The texture on tektronix scopes was achieved in a variety of ways.

On scopes, such as the 545-585, the aluminum panels were photo
engraved and etched with the pattern.

On scopes, such as the portables, the texture is actually a vinyl
coating on the aluminum... as is the color.

-Chuck Harris

greenboxmaven via groups.io wrote:

What type of paint was the original finish? How was the texture achieved?

     Bruce Gentry, KA2IVY


On 12/9/20 8:38, Keith wrote:
Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my
responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.











Stephen Hanselman
 

Keith,

Thanks, well explained. I agree on the single stage, it’s not hard to shoot, this was my first large scale project a TR6. I did discover that temperature was a big deal, don’t spray below 70degF.

Regards,

Stephen Hanselman
Datagate Systems, LLC

On Dec 9, 2020, at 05:38, Keith <coolblueglow@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Probably most every guy on this forum has fixed more tech scopes than I have (I only have four scopes and a curve tracer at the moment.) But I’m willing to bet that I’ve shot more lacquer over the past thirty years than any five of you guys combined, 🙂...so a couple of thoughts here that may help.

First, you really are making this way too hard. Lacquer is still about as common as dirt, and not a problem to ship. You just have to know where to look and how to ask for it. If you want to buy online, try TCP Global. Heck, they even show TEK Blue under their standard “appliance finishes”. You can get it by the quart in everything from lacquer to acrylic enamel to urethane single stage to urethane base coat clear combos...In other words any finish type you ever would really want to try using! 🙂 I admit that $149-179 a quart is a little pricey, but hey it’s for our HOBBY, right? 😂 ...and you can paint quite a few scope covers with a quart of lacquer.

Second - You have a good formula someone else posted here. Take that to any decent local automotive paint store and they can generally mix what you want.

Third - if the local paint shop can’t figure out or mix the original Tek formula, first take a little rubbing compound to that extra Tek scope cover to shed the oxidation, and then take it to a paint shop with a scanner. (They too are about as common as dirt.) Have them shoot five samples and average them. You will get really close and really it will be fine...because you are going to paint the whole cover, right?

Fourth - again, I love lacquer and I have shot it a lot - but IF I were choosing to go this route, I believe I would skip the lacquer fuss and just use a single stage urethane. It is just so much more durable and not that fussy.

Fifth - if shooting your own is just too hard, fine. Get the paint and take it to a local auto body shop friend. Do your own removal of the original Tek paint. Bring a clean, ready to shoot piece and your own paint and have him shoot it. Not rocket science here...and WAY easier than repairing the broken A5 board on a 2465b, for example 🤓

Sixth, and just from my eyeballs looking at my various Tek scope covers, I believe I would drop a little flatting agent in there as well. Maybe 15-20%? Without flatting agent, these finishes are going to be way too glossy.

Seventh and finally - there is no such thing as “oil based lacquer”. That’s enamel. No oil in lacquer, or you will be really really sorry when you spray it.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.





Daveolla
 

Greetings, This subject comes up fairly often on this group and is usually just the same old same old, this time round we already have a few new posts with good points added to the mix!

I haven't used lacquer sprays much, usually due to it affecting what I would be spraying it on or over, but the last couple of years began using cans I have had in the paint cupboard more. However when I try to find it at Wallmart or Canadian Tire etc I find they dont carry it anymore. I figured it is an environmental issue. I guess Im coming to the party to late, or you snooze you lose kinnda thing.

Keith posted about using a flatting agent in the paint mix. What would be good to use when that cant be done and you need to dull a glossy spray down after it is dried?
I usually use xxxx (4 x's) fine steel wool or fine auto rubbing compounds and perhaps a paste-wax after that, though not ideal when you have crevices and such in the article. I have tried TSP trisodium phosphate as is often suggested (not from this group though) to put in the paint or used after it is dried but so far it has never worked to my liking.

If you know someone with the Tek spray (not a company) they could probably sneak it into the mail but the rattles cans should set of the bells an whisl......rattles and the post office. If it is a older can that doesn't rattle anymore unless shaken a lot you might succeed. Trying to muffle with padding or even a pillow aint gonna work., but adding a pile of marbles or nut and bolts or stones to box would certainly disguise the can rattle an not rat you out....I think.

Dave

postedAt 07:38 AM 12/09/2020, you wrote:

Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Probably most every guy on this forum has fixed more tech scopes than I have (I only have four scopes and a curve tracer at the moment.) But I’m willing to bet that I’ve shot more lacquer over the past thirty years than any five of you guys combined, 🙂...so a couple of thoughts here that may help.

First, you really are making this way too hard. Lacquer is still about as common as dirt, and not a problem to ship. You just have to know where to look and how to ask for it. If you want to buy online, try TCP Global. Heck, they even show TEK Blue under their standard “appliance finishesâ€&#65533;. You can get it by the quart in everything from lacquer to acrylic enamel to urethane single stage to urethane base coat clear combos...In other words any finish type you ever would really want to try using! 🙂 I admit that $149-179 a quart is a little pricey, but hey it’s for our HOBBY, right? 😂 ...and you can paint quite a few scope covers with a quart of lacquer.

Second - You have a good formula someone else posted here. Take that to any decent local automotive paint store and they can generally mix what you want.

Third - if the local paint shop can’t figure out or mix the original Tek formula, first take a little rubbing compound to that extra Tek scope cover to shed the oxidation, and then take it to a paint shop with a scanner. (They too are about as common as dirt.) Have them shoot five samples and average them. You will get really close and really it will be fine...because you are going to paint the whole cover, right?

Fourth - again, I love lacquer and I have shot it a lot - but IF I were choosing to go this route, I believe I would skip the lacquer fuss and just use a single stage urethane. It is just so much more durable and not that fussy.

Fifth - if shooting your own is just too hard, fine. Get the paint and take it to a local auto body shop friend. Do your own removal of the original Tek paint. Bring a clean, ready to shoot piece and your own paint and have him shoot it. Not rocket science here...and WAY easier than repairing the broken A5 board on a 2465b, for example 🤓

Sixth, and just from my eyeballs looking at my various Tek scope covers, I believe I would drop a little flatting agent in there as well. Maybe 15-20%? Without flatting agent, these finishes are going to be way too glossy.

Seventh and finally - there is no such thing as “oil based lacquerâ€&#65533;. That’s enamel. No oil in lacquer, or you will be really really sorry when you spray it.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.



 

TR6 ?  Triumph? Car or Motorcycle?

Regards, Tom

On 12/9/2020 11:17 AM, Stephen Hanselman wrote:
Keith,

Thanks, well explained. I agree on the single stage, it’s not hard to shoot, this was my first large scale project a TR6. I did discover that temperature was a big deal, don’t spray below 70degF.

Regards,
Stephen Hanselman
Datagate Systems, LLC
On Dec 9, 2020, at 05:38, Keith <coolblueglow@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi guys,
I lurk here a lot and seldom post. Seeing this chatter reminded me of my responsibility to contribute in my areas of expertise.

Probably most every guy on this forum has fixed more tech scopes than I have (I only have four scopes and a curve tracer at the moment.) But I’m willing to bet that I’ve shot more lacquer over the past thirty years than any five of you guys combined, 🙂...so a couple of thoughts here that may help.

First, you really are making this way too hard. Lacquer is still about as common as dirt, and not a problem to ship. You just have to know where to look and how to ask for it. If you want to buy online, try TCP Global. Heck, they even show TEK Blue under their standard “appliance finishes”. You can get it by the quart in everything from lacquer to acrylic enamel to urethane single stage to urethane base coat clear combos...In other words any finish type you ever would really want to try using! 🙂 I admit that $149-179 a quart is a little pricey, but hey it’s for our HOBBY, right? 😂 ...and you can paint quite a few scope covers with a quart of lacquer.

Second - You have a good formula someone else posted here. Take that to any decent local automotive paint store and they can generally mix what you want.

Third - if the local paint shop can’t figure out or mix the original Tek formula, first take a little rubbing compound to that extra Tek scope cover to shed the oxidation, and then take it to a paint shop with a scanner. (They too are about as common as dirt.) Have them shoot five samples and average them. You will get really close and really it will be fine...because you are going to paint the whole cover, right?

Fourth - again, I love lacquer and I have shot it a lot - but IF I were choosing to go this route, I believe I would skip the lacquer fuss and just use a single stage urethane. It is just so much more durable and not that fussy.

Fifth - if shooting your own is just too hard, fine. Get the paint and take it to a local auto body shop friend. Do your own removal of the original Tek paint. Bring a clean, ready to shoot piece and your own paint and have him shoot it. Not rocket science here...and WAY easier than repairing the broken A5 board on a 2465b, for example 🤓

Sixth, and just from my eyeballs looking at my various Tek scope covers, I believe I would drop a little flatting agent in there as well. Maybe 15-20%? Without flatting agent, these finishes are going to be way too glossy.

Seventh and finally - there is no such thing as “oil based lacquer”. That’s enamel. No oil in lacquer, or you will be really really sorry when you spray it.

Just some thoughts on the ongoing saga of worrying about keeping our blue scopes blue.





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