Fair Radio Sales Lima Ohio


Tim Laing
 

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil, not a close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time. I can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to have at least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone there on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of the day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing


ken chalfant
 

Greetings,

I feel like I’m jumping in somewhere in the middle of this story (thread), but I can’t help it. This sounds all too familiar.

I live in Colorado Springs, Colorado. There has been a “surplus” electronics store here for 34 years and I have been a customer for all that time. It’s funny now that I think about it. I was 34 when they opened, now I’m not.

Anyway, they started trying to go out of business in mid to late 2019 and finally managed to close the doors for the last time just a couple of weeks ago. That store was priceless to me and others and it is a great loss although many may never realize that. For years I cared for old, obsolete printing equipment as well as other machines and equipment. Often what had failed on a machine was as obsolete as the machine itself. On very rare occasions I would find the exact - otherwise unobtainable part - waiting for me on a shelf. Other times I would stand there in an aisle and design a repair solution from what lay before me.

If I hadn’t kept those old machines running people would have lost their jobs.

Now that store is gone - forever.

Funny though, in the last fleeting moments I couldn’t let it all go so I bought all the semiconductors. I don’t even know yet what I have, but the store owner guessed I bought about 100,000 individual parts. Fortunately, it was all in bin boxes but even so it required two full loads of a topper covered 3/4 ton truck and about 5 loads of my topper covered smaller truck.

Crazy huh…

I have known about Fair Radio as far back as I can remember and I have purchased a few items over the years.

I think these stores are far more important than most realize. Not everything in the world is shiny new and a lot of people depend on some very old and sometimes very tired “things” to keep their lives moving forward and even the thought of another such place approaching the end of the line is very, very sad.

Forgive my use of our bandwidth to take a walk down memory lane.

Regards,

Ken

On 27Nov, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil, not a close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time. I can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to have at least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone there on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of the day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing





Dave Seiter
 

When I started going to surplus stores in the mid to late 70's, we had many options.  The best was Haltek.  Being in Mountain View, it was full of both ancient (to me) oddities, and recent scrap.  When I was building my first PET computer from scrap, I needed "storage", and Haltek just happened to have a large box of Commodore cassette drives and some test shot or prototype cases. I even sold them some of my findings.  
They are long gone, as are Allied Electronics in Palo Alto (the junk store, not the disty), two places in Sunnyvale I can barely recall, Halted (Haltek's overpriced competition; which moved a while back, then closed.  Apparently they are open again, having been sold to Excess Solutions); Even the newer Weird Stuff is gone, but I rarely found anything I was looking for there.  I have vague memories of short-lived stores further south too. 
Rents are so high now that an existing store would need to own it's building outright and sell a lot of material just to survive.  Most people want shiny, new things these days, not dusty old scrap.
-Dave

On Friday, November 27, 2020, 08:12:36 PM PST, ken chalfant <kpchalfant@msn.com> wrote:

Greetings,

I feel like I’m jumping in somewhere in the middle of this story (thread), but I can’t help it.  This sounds all too familiar.

I live in Colorado Springs, Colorado.  There has been a “surplus” electronics store here for 34 years and I have been a customer for all that time.  It’s funny now that I think about it.  I was 34 when they opened, now I’m not.

Anyway, they started trying to go out of business in mid to late 2019 and finally managed to close the doors for the last time just a couple of weeks ago.  That store was priceless to me and others and it is a great loss although many may never realize that.  For years I cared for old, obsolete printing equipment as well as other machines and equipment.  Often what had failed on a machine was as obsolete as the machine itself.  On very rare occasions I would find the exact - otherwise unobtainable part - waiting for me on a shelf.  Other times I would stand there in an aisle and design a repair solution from what lay before me.

If I hadn’t kept those old machines running people would have lost their jobs.

Now that store is gone - forever.

Funny though, in the last fleeting moments I couldn’t let it all go so I bought all the semiconductors.  I don’t even know yet what I have, but the store owner guessed I bought about 100,000 individual parts.  Fortunately, it was all in bin boxes but even so it required two full loads of a topper covered 3/4 ton truck and about 5 loads of my topper covered smaller truck.

Crazy huh…

I have known about Fair Radio as far back as I can remember and I have purchased a few items over the years.

I think these stores are far more important than most realize.  Not everything in the world is shiny new and a lot of people depend on some very old and sometimes very tired “things” to keep their lives moving forward and even the thought of another such place approaching the end of the line is very, very sad.

Forgive my use of our bandwidth to take a walk down memory lane.

Regards,

Ken


On 27Nov, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio.  I know the owner Phil, not a close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
    I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time. I can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to have at least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix....  I have gone there on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
  I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”.  Maria and I are still Married going on 31 years.
    Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of the day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old dairy buildings located on Eureka Street.  Tim Laing





Michael A. Terrell
 

I first visited Fair Radio around 1970. A lot of other Ohio based surplus
dealers are long gone.I worked for an asset recovery company in the Orlando
area in the early '90s. Part of the business was to sell scrap mainframe
boards to IC recovery businesses. The people that ran these companies were
mostly stupid. The would measure the remaining length of IC leads on the
solder side of boards, and reject most of them as too short to reuse. Thes
boards were almost as thick as the tapered part of the pins were long, so I
started recovering and selling popular ICs to our regular customers. The
only condition was that they had to buy entire tubes of one part number. I
could recover, and retin the leads of several thousand DRAMs per day. We
sold them for $2.75 each. The IC recovery companies had turned them down at
15 cents each. The same for common EPROMs at the time. They offered a
nickel, each for the few that they bought. I sold them for $1.50 each. Just
those two groups supported a lot of small computer stores, and development
companies. As stated above, most people have no clue of the value of
surplus. A lot of businesses were started from WW-II surplus, Millions were
made from what most thought was trash. The termination of many government
contracts dumped billions of components on the surplus market. Many claimed
that early Heathkit scopes were built from mostly surplus, and some parts
had a pre war look to them. A lot of kids went into Electronics because of
the availability of cheap surplus components.

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:21 PM Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil, not a
close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time. I
can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to have at
least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone there
on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I
are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a
bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of the
day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old
dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing






stevenhorii
 

Tim,

Your story reminded me of my first date with my wife (we'll celebrate 30
years in 2021). I took her to Vulcan Surplus (closed years ago) in
Stamford, CT. I lived in NYC the first time I went and later when I lived
in northern NJ. We went to United House Wrecking afterward - they were an
outfit that salvaged stuff from houses and other buildings being torn down.
Not much electronics, but acres of other stuff. Some of those things would
likely have been worth the "investment" - old wooden public telephone
booths for example. Besides the surplus electronics I found at Vulcan,
there was also their huge stock of hardware, most of it stainless steel.
You could buy stainless steel screws, washers, nuts, etc. by the pound.
They did charge more for the really small stuff - stainless screws in 0-80
to 2-56 - a box of 100 of these (in the original manufacturer boxes) was
$1-2. I have been to Fair Radio Sales - my in-laws live in Ohio near Dayton
- but only a couple of times. Other stuff I bought from their catalogs. I
knew my wife-to-be at the time was the right person for me - she's not an
engineer but she did work (until she retired) as a systems analyst and
software development team manager.

The sad bit is when surplus dealers go out of business and with no one to
take it over, stuff often goes to scrap dealers. I am pretty sure that this
is what happened to Omnibus Electronics on Long Island. Lou Lasser owned
the place and there was an associated business that did contract
electronics work. Lou bought a lot of stuff from the aerospace companies on
Long Island so it was like a candy store for me - I spent a lot of money
over the years on Apollo surplus from Grumman and Kollsman Instrument. I
still have boxes of small parts from the Apollo optical stuff. Sadly, four
Apollo Lunar Module Alignment Optical Telescopes got scrapped. Brand-new in
the NASA blue transit cases. I managed to get some of the eyepiece
assemblies and various spares, but no complete telescopes. Also scrapped
were three of the much more elaborate Apollo Command Module Optical Unit
Assemblies - they housed the sextant and telescope assemblies used for
updating the inertial navigation system. Lou claimed he told one of the
guys who scrapped stuff not to scrap the LM AOT and CM OUA, but the message
never got to the other guys and when Lou was out on a buying trip, the
person he told not to scrap the Apollo stuff was out making a delivery and
the other guys went after the Apollo stuff with hammers. They sold the
scrap beryllium for about $120 a pound. I saw (and bought) the remains of
these, so I don't doubt he had the complete units. The CM OUA had about 60
pounds of beryllium in it (actually, the whole casing was a large beryllium
piece). Lou had a second building he used for storage - he let my friend
and I look around, but he said the later Grumman stuff was in large crates
on pallet racks and getting them down would take too long. I did buy some
test equipment from him, but not much Tek stuff - a couple of letter and
1-series plug-ins. His prices for test equipment were a little too high. He
moved the business years later and my buddy and I went out there - also
still on Long Island. We both found interesting stuff and bought it. He
showed us several rows of truck trailers in his back lot full of all that
stuff that had been in the storage warehouse - so we still never got to see
it because it was late in the day by that time and getting into those
trailers would have been a difficult task. The next time we called him, the
number had been disconnected and we were told he had passed away. No one
could tell us who purchased the building and lot - my friend went by and
both were empty. We have no idea what happened to all that stuff. If there
was a lot of space program surplus from Grumman, it has not shown up on
eBay or in the space program auctions. It either went to scrap or someone
is hoarding it. If anyone on this thread had been to Omnibus or knew Lou
Lasser, I'd love to know more. Lou was a very nice guy and he always had
great stories about getting the surplus stuff he did acquire.

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:21 PM Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil, not a
close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time. I
can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to have at
least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone there
on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I
are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a
bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of the
day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old
dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing






stevenhorii
 

All these stories about surplus made me wonder - is there a group dedicated
to surplus? The stories are usually great ones.

Steve H.

On Sat, Nov 28, 2020 at 1:22 AM Steven Horii <sonodocsch@gmail.com> wrote:

Tim,

Your story reminded me of my first date with my wife (we'll celebrate 30
years in 2021). I took her to Vulcan Surplus (closed years ago) in
Stamford, CT. I lived in NYC the first time I went and later when I lived
in northern NJ. We went to United House Wrecking afterward - they were an
outfit that salvaged stuff from houses and other buildings being torn down.
Not much electronics, but acres of other stuff. Some of those things would
likely have been worth the "investment" - old wooden public telephone
booths for example. Besides the surplus electronics I found at Vulcan,
there was also their huge stock of hardware, most of it stainless steel.
You could buy stainless steel screws, washers, nuts, etc. by the pound.
They did charge more for the really small stuff - stainless screws in 0-80
to 2-56 - a box of 100 of these (in the original manufacturer boxes) was
$1-2. I have been to Fair Radio Sales - my in-laws live in Ohio near Dayton
- but only a couple of times. Other stuff I bought from their catalogs. I
knew my wife-to-be at the time was the right person for me - she's not an
engineer but she did work (until she retired) as a systems analyst and
software development team manager.

The sad bit is when surplus dealers go out of business and with no one to
take it over, stuff often goes to scrap dealers. I am pretty sure that this
is what happened to Omnibus Electronics on Long Island. Lou Lasser owned
the place and there was an associated business that did contract
electronics work. Lou bought a lot of stuff from the aerospace companies on
Long Island so it was like a candy store for me - I spent a lot of money
over the years on Apollo surplus from Grumman and Kollsman Instrument. I
still have boxes of small parts from the Apollo optical stuff. Sadly, four
Apollo Lunar Module Alignment Optical Telescopes got scrapped. Brand-new in
the NASA blue transit cases. I managed to get some of the eyepiece
assemblies and various spares, but no complete telescopes. Also scrapped
were three of the much more elaborate Apollo Command Module Optical Unit
Assemblies - they housed the sextant and telescope assemblies used for
updating the inertial navigation system. Lou claimed he told one of the
guys who scrapped stuff not to scrap the LM AOT and CM OUA, but the message
never got to the other guys and when Lou was out on a buying trip, the
person he told not to scrap the Apollo stuff was out making a delivery and
the other guys went after the Apollo stuff with hammers. They sold the
scrap beryllium for about $120 a pound. I saw (and bought) the remains of
these, so I don't doubt he had the complete units. The CM OUA had about 60
pounds of beryllium in it (actually, the whole casing was a large beryllium
piece). Lou had a second building he used for storage - he let my friend
and I look around, but he said the later Grumman stuff was in large crates
on pallet racks and getting them down would take too long. I did buy some
test equipment from him, but not much Tek stuff - a couple of letter and
1-series plug-ins. His prices for test equipment were a little too high. He
moved the business years later and my buddy and I went out there - also
still on Long Island. We both found interesting stuff and bought it. He
showed us several rows of truck trailers in his back lot full of all that
stuff that had been in the storage warehouse - so we still never got to see
it because it was late in the day by that time and getting into those
trailers would have been a difficult task. The next time we called him, the
number had been disconnected and we were told he had passed away. No one
could tell us who purchased the building and lot - my friend went by and
both were empty. We have no idea what happened to all that stuff. If there
was a lot of space program surplus from Grumman, it has not shown up on
eBay or in the space program auctions. It either went to scrap or someone
is hoarding it. If anyone on this thread had been to Omnibus or knew Lou
Lasser, I'd love to know more. Lou was a very nice guy and he always had
great stories about getting the surplus stuff he did acquire.

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:21 PM Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil, not
a close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time. I
can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to have at
least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone there
on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I
are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a
bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of the
day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old
dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing






saipan59 (Pete)
 

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 09:12 PM, ken chalfant wrote:


I live in Colorado Springs, Colorado. There has been a “surplus”
electronics store here for 34 years
Hi Ken,
I'm here in C.S. also, and shopped at OEM many times since the 80's. I worked at DEC, as did Dick's "employee/partner" Robert.
I'm curious what you plan to do with all the semiconductors you bought?

Pete


garp66
 

Surplus, of course, has been the best place to get stuff for repairs, ... but further, to leap ahead for invent.

University research labs on small budgets, high school students just getting started, and small companies all able to take advantage
of Obso, over-run, or cancelled project debris. No matter where, from Boston/MIT, Harvard; Eli Hefferon & sons, or the many in New Hampshire, and many more down the coast to Florida, due to the Cape; Dayton forever(lets hope), the many in the midwestern states and the huge surplus warehouses in silicon valley & up the coast to Boeing surplus sales, and beyond (Hello Walter !).

One could spend a lifetime wandering through them and most assured able to find treasures of yesteryear, "... ah ha, that's how they did it".
fortunes were spent on the design, engineering and construction of a part, let alone systems, materials and processes that wandered off to surplus floors, and then to the high temperature kilns or landfills of history. We do not even know what we have lost, and the old timers who knew that something of value still remained.

It is a hard day indeed when that source dries up...
While barely detailed in "The Hackers", ...at least the surplus "concept" was mentioned.
There are details of technological history in the remnants that might never be comprehended.

Curiously, Surplus junk yards are often a short-stop in movies such as the various Star Trek's( even in Discovery, etc.), Star Wars, & so on...

May they ever be there for us & those that follow, for the future.


Greg Muir
 

I’ll try to make this a brief note but it probably won’t happen.

Having spent nearly 35 years of my profession in Colorado I managed to visit many surplus stores around the area. It was a treat to see anything from more recent (I’m talking 60’s) back through WWII equipment. But, alas, one by one these stores slowly disappeared.

Then there were the stores that collected legacy & excess parts & supplies from other local business who deemed the stock no longer necessary. Of note was one superb store in Boulder that had an impressive inventory of all kinds of parts from the local HP factories in Colorado Springs, Loveland, Fort Collins and other areas. In addition they had a equipment consignment area where they would take in test & miscellaneous equipment for sale. The prices were right. A virtual gold mine to visit. But the demise of this resource ended in the sale to a new owner a few years ago, their not being able to pay the rent and the landlord moving everything out into dumpsters.

I learned of “surplus” at a very early age (and I will not allude to what the term “early” is for fear of reminding myself about how old I really am). But it was in a different form. The local air force base in my home town never really dealt with selling off excess property to any extent but, rather, simply sent it over to the local scrap iron yard.

During the summer months I would ride my bike over to the iron yard to see what goodies had been dumped by the base. They were always generous with their offerings to include things like complete radar systems (yes, transmitting equipment, antennas, scopes – the works), actual aircraft trainers (still have boxes of nice P&B relays and instruments pulled from them), test equipment (including HP, Tek, others) and a myriad of other items in very good condition. One day I even encountered a battle tank from the local army reserve complete with twin Cadillac engines. It became parted out rather quickly by the scrap iron yard.

All items that came through the yard from the AF base were tagged as to the repairability status. Most carried a yellow tag (no problems, just excessed) and the few red tagged items (repairs required) were found to have simple fixes (bad line cords, etc.).

The old man who ran the yard was wise enough to store much of the test equipment in an old Quonset hut located on the property behind a locked door. But he was always welcome to open it up for me since he knew that my browsing would result in a sale. He really ran a hard deal when purchasing items. But since I went to school with his son he would offer a generous “discount.” Base price for anything was $0.10 a pound (yes, 10 cents) but when presented with an item containing any copper (transformers, etc.) the price went up to $0.15 a pound (yes, again – 15 cents).

My home basement was always filled to capacity thanks to a generous weekly allowance of a few dollars. But I had to put up with the nagging from my parents whenever I called them from the scrap iron yard to come over with the car to haul everything home. Not all 10 through 14 year olds in the neighborhood had nice test equipment in their basements in those days.

My last foray to the yard was when I had already been living in Colorado but went home for my summer vacation. On a whim I decided to stop over to the yard to see what they had. To my surprise I found plenty. This was the time when the USAF SAGE system (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semi-Automatic_Ground_Environment),
(https://www.ll.mit.edu/about/history/sage-semi-automatic-ground-environment-air-defense-system) was being decommissioned and the Air Direction Centers (of which the local AF base had one) were being torn out.

As I approached the yard I couldn’t believe my eyes. There in front of me were the two massive AN/FSQ-7 vacuum tube computers with many of their 50,000+ vacuum tubes either missing or broken (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AN/FSQ-7_Combat_Direction_Central), the radar transmitter equipment, the radar scopes – everything sitting out in the weather. One area of the property contained hundreds of 55 gallon drums containing long lengths of white and orange pipe sticking out of them which turned out to be the remnants of the massive radar antenna (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SAGE_radar_stations#/media/File:Fortuna_Air_Force_Station.jpg).
So it turned out to be a multi-day visit to obtain a few memorabilia from that system. Somewhere in my stuff I still have boxes of the nice Westinghouse panel meters removed from the radar transmitter cabinets).

I miss those days. Now everything is put onto the markets no matter if it is worth anything or not to be purchased at high prices through the bidding process or cutthroat sellers trying to exact every penny from items they don’t even have any idea as to what they are. Aside from that we have to be thankful for hamfests and such where buyers and sellers still can come to reasonable agreements about cost (but the prices still often exceed my past $0.10/pound experience but I have to be very understanding).

Greg


David Kuhn
 

" Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil, not
a close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires..."

I ordered a 3A6 module from him for $52, I think. The web site states that
shipping will be charged when they process the order, so I don't know the
shipping. I see on my bank site that a $52 charge is pending from "Fair
Radio", so I don't know if he charged me shipping or not. I thought the
module was $52, maybe it was less. Yes, I just looked it was $52. I had
emailed him and he tells me all tubes and everything are in it. He sent me
pictures and it looks good.

You say he is pricey. On EBAY a 3A1 is trying to be sold for $400. So, I
thought $52 was reasonable.

Is Fair Radio a family business? From the sounds of your message, it
sounds like he is pretty old and you are worrying about him finally
retiring. I would like to make a trip out to there when this virus BS is
finally over.

Dave

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:21 PM Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil, not a
close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time. I
can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to have at
least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone there
on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I
are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a
bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of the
day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old
dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing






David Kuhn
 

" Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio."

One more question Tim. When I lived in Cincinnati (from 1985-1999),
sometime early to mid of being there, probably around 1990, there used to
be a HUGH HUGH surplus electronics warehouse in Dayton, Ohio. It was in a
very old building, but it was HUGH HUGH. I bought a heavy industrial cart
from them that I still have and use. Then I forgot about that place, life
got in the way, all I was interested in was modern stuff, etc., yada, yada,
yada, and I didn't re-visit in the 1990s anymore and then moved back to
central PA. Is there still a surplus store in Dayton, like that? I
imagine it went bye-bye like most others.

Dave

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:21 PM Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil, not a
close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time. I
can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to have at
least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone there
on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I
are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a
bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of the
day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old
dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing






David Holland
 

Mendelsons

In the process of closing now. It was supposed to have closed several
months earlier but they're still trying to clean out the building.

David

Sent via mobile annoyance thingy, please pardon any typos.

On Sat, Nov 28, 2020, 6:35 PM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio."

One more question Tim. When I lived in Cincinnati (from 1985-1999),
sometime early to mid of being there, probably around 1990, there used to
be a HUGH HUGH surplus electronics warehouse in Dayton, Ohio. It was in a
very old building, but it was HUGH HUGH. I bought a heavy industrial cart
from them that I still have and use. Then I forgot about that place, life
got in the way, all I was interested in was modern stuff, etc., yada, yada,
yada, and I didn't re-visit in the 1990s anymore and then moved back to
central PA. Is there still a surplus store in Dayton, like that? I
imagine it went bye-bye like most others.

Dave

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:21 PM Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil, not
a
close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time. I
can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to have
at
least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone there
on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I
are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a
bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of the
day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old
dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing










David Kuhn
 

“ Mendelsons”

That’s it! Closing? <sad> I was out in July and never thought of them.

On Sat, Nov 28, 2020 at 6:46 PM David Holland <david.w.holland@gmail.com>
wrote:

Mendelsons

In the process of closing now. It was supposed to have closed several
months earlier but they're still trying to clean out the building.

David

Sent via mobile annoyance thingy, please pardon any typos.

On Sat, Nov 28, 2020, 6:35 PM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio."

One more question Tim. When I lived in Cincinnati (from 1985-1999),
sometime early to mid of being there, probably around 1990, there used to
be a HUGH HUGH surplus electronics warehouse in Dayton, Ohio. It was in
a
very old building, but it was HUGH HUGH. I bought a heavy industrial
cart
from them that I still have and use. Then I forgot about that place,
life
got in the way, all I was interested in was modern stuff, etc., yada,
yada,
yada, and I didn't re-visit in the 1990s anymore and then moved back to
central PA. Is there still a surplus store in Dayton, like that? I
imagine it went bye-bye like most others.

Dave

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:21 PM Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:

Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil,
not
a
close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time.
I
can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to
have
at
least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone
there
on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I
are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a
bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of
the
day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old
dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing














Kyle Rhodes
 

Mendelson’s was ridiculous, such an enormous space and quantity of stuff. I recently bought 26 gaylords worth of resistors, wire, chips, diodes, transistors, pneumatic actuators, hardware, etc, etc. So much stuff, all still sitting in my warehouse mostly unsorted. Soon though, once we’re caught up after our Black Friday sale, I’m looking forward to going through it all! Anyone in the Cincinnati / Dayton area is welcome to come to the shop, just drop me a line.

On Nov 28, 2020, at 7:33 PM, David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

“ Mendelsons”

That’s it! Closing? <sad> I was out in July and never thought of them.

On Sat, Nov 28, 2020 at 6:46 PM David Holland <david.w.holland@gmail.com>
wrote:

Mendelsons

In the process of closing now. It was supposed to have closed several
months earlier but they're still trying to clean out the building.

David

Sent via mobile annoyance thingy, please pardon any typos.

On Sat, Nov 28, 2020, 6:35 PM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio."

One more question Tim. When I lived in Cincinnati (from 1985-1999),
sometime early to mid of being there, probably around 1990, there used to
be a HUGH HUGH surplus electronics warehouse in Dayton, Ohio. It was in
a
very old building, but it was HUGH HUGH. I bought a heavy industrial
cart
from them that I still have and use. Then I forgot about that place,
life
got in the way, all I was interested in was modern stuff, etc., yada,
yada,
yada, and I didn't re-visit in the 1990s anymore and then moved back to
central PA. Is there still a surplus store in Dayton, like that? I
imagine it went bye-bye like most others.

Dave

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:21 PM Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:
Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil,
not
a
close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time.
I
can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to
have
at
least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone
there
on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59 now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I
are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a
bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of
the
day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the old
dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing

















Eric
 

Kyle once the covid is over ill take you up on that.

On Sat, Nov 28, 2020, 8:20 PM Kyle Rhodes <ksrhodes@gmail.com> wrote:

Mendelson’s was ridiculous, such an enormous space and quantity of stuff.
I recently bought 26 gaylords worth of resistors, wire, chips, diodes,
transistors, pneumatic actuators, hardware, etc, etc. So much stuff, all
still sitting in my warehouse mostly unsorted. Soon though, once we’re
caught up after our Black Friday sale, I’m looking forward to going through
it all! Anyone in the Cincinnati / Dayton area is welcome to come to the
shop, just drop me a line.



On Nov 28, 2020, at 7:33 PM, David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

“ Mendelsons”

That’s it! Closing? <sad> I was out in July and never thought of them.

On Sat, Nov 28, 2020 at 6:46 PM David Holland <
david.w.holland@gmail.com>
wrote:

Mendelsons

In the process of closing now. It was supposed to have closed several
months earlier but they're still trying to clean out the building.

David

Sent via mobile annoyance thingy, please pardon any typos.

On Sat, Nov 28, 2020, 6:35 PM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio."

One more question Tim. When I lived in Cincinnati (from 1985-1999),
sometime early to mid of being there, probably around 1990, there used
to
be a HUGH HUGH surplus electronics warehouse in Dayton, Ohio. It was
in
a
very old building, but it was HUGH HUGH. I bought a heavy industrial
cart
from them that I still have and use. Then I forgot about that place,
life
got in the way, all I was interested in was modern stuff, etc., yada,
yada,
yada, and I didn't re-visit in the 1990s anymore and then moved back to
central PA. Is there still a surplus store in Dayton, like that? I
imagine it went bye-bye like most others.

Dave

On Fri, Nov 27, 2020 at 8:21 PM Tim Laing <laingt@wcoil.com> wrote:
Hello, I live about 2 miles from Fair radio. I know the owner Phil,
not
a
close friend though. I am not sure what will happen when he
retires....
I do not know if the show room is open to the public at this time.
I
can do some checking. I can stop in but if I do I generally need to
have
at
least 2 hours free to wander around and get my fix.... I have gone
there
on missions for other people in the past. I could check on plug ins.
My first visit was probably when I was 13 or 14 years old, I am 59
now.
I took my future wife to Fair Radio on our first “date”. Maria and I
are still Married going on 31 years.
Prices are not cheap but he has a lot of overhead costs. I have a
bunch of pictures that I have taken there in the past, I am afraid of
the
day I find out they are closing. I wish I had taken pictures in the
old
dairy buildings located on Eureka Street. Tim Laing





















tekscopegroup@...
 

I recall walking Canal Street in lower Manhattan in 1976 during a vacation trip with my parents. It was store after store of surplus electronics. Better than a candy store!
Remember buying bunch of stuff, a 120v muffin fan with a slightly chipped fan blade, VU meters, some TO-3 devices and other stuff mounted on heatsinks, etc etc etc, and also a dirt cheap non working Cobra 132XLR radio which ended up having an open secondary in one of the IF transformers.

Did quite a bit of walking on my own during that trip, went on foot all the way from 57th from The Plaza where we where staying down to 32nd and 5th to a Radio Shack store. That was always a must do thing for me on any trips to the US to buy the little Archer components inside the individual color coded cardboard and plastic boxes that one could hang on a hook in the hobby room until needed. Plus all the other stuff I had to get for friends back home.