Topics

A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek Semiconductor Curve Trace


Charlie Conger
 

Excellent work Dennis. One of the best documented projects I have seen.

Charlie Conger


hpxref
 

OCTAL VALVE SOCKETS:
Dennis' comment re octal sockets still being made is of passing interest to me
In the late 80's early 90's I designed and part pro typed a "modern" valve tester having a small footprint

It used only two octal valve sockets (for valve matching purpose, think KT66/88's) and used old octal valve bases cut from defunct valves
as adapters to B7G/B9G sockets epoxied into them 4, 5 pin and others were an extra option.
(I wound up with a 44 gallon drum full of defunct octal and other valves at one stage, most sourced from old timer country farmers sheds )
A micro with a user keypad allowed type selection from EPROM's storage and then to EPROM control to programmable
PSUs switchers which supplied HT and filament voltages plus g2 along with programmable current limits.
Display of gm/u , emission etc by multi line LCD panel.
The micro set up the valve connections by means of a matrix of miniature gold plated relays
A RS232 port allowed an external PC to display valve curve characteristics as an option via sweeping the programmable grid bias supply
and digitizing the valve data by 12bit ADC's into a serial format .
The PC screen display software was being written in C, rather than VB

Whats relevant here is that I wanted to get new octal sockets at the time and I could not get hold of a reliable quality supply
of the same look and make I needed 200 to start with and couldn't source them! (in Western Australia)
I had a few dozen NOS and used ones , but not enough of the same "looks" as looks were very important too.
Chassis was two 6mm thick anodized Al girder sections milled and mated,with Al end plates, fold back top cover was blue acrylic with safety switch
and led lighting dominated the interior....the main market was to be directed to the HIFI crazies (matching of KT66/88) but would be good for anyone wanting
accurate data with a valve matching facility....software options were AF valve range as standard, RF and others optional extras )
An unfortunate accident when moving house, the lack of suitable octal socket supplies and the then international situation sort of killed it, but its interesting
to note that octal sockets are still being made
Do you think, then, that the thing could be re activated and sell in today's market?
Eg for old tubed TEK scopes?

John


Bill (Doc) Courtright
 

John,
I posted this link earlier but it got lost. Here is what looks like a current version of what you were building and it's stand alone. www.maximatcher.com/


Bill, KB3DKS

-----Original Message-----
From: face1941 face1941@westnet.com.au [TekScopes] <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: TekScopes <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mon, Mar 20, 2017 3:27 am
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek Semiconductor Curve Trace

OCTAL VALVE SOCKETS:
Dennis' comment re octal sockets still being made is of passing interest
to me
In the late 80's early 90's I designed and part pro typed a "modern"
valve tester having a small footprint

It used only two octal valve sockets (for valve matching purpose, think
KT66/88's) and used old octal valve bases cut from defunct valves
as adapters to B7G/B9G sockets epoxied into them 4, 5 pin and
others were an extra option.
(I wound up with a 44 gallon drum full of defunct octal and other valves
at one stage, most sourced from old timer country farmers sheds )
A micro with a user keypad allowed type selection from EPROM's
storage and then to EPROM control to programmable
PSUs switchers which supplied HT and filament voltages plus g2 along
with programmable current limits.
Display of gm/u , emission etc by multi line LCD panel.
The micro set up the valve connections by means of a matrix of miniature
gold plated relays
A RS232 port allowed an external PC to display valve curve
characteristics as an option via sweeping the programmable grid bias supply
and digitizing the valve data by 12bit ADC's into a serial format .
The PC screen display software was being written in C, rather than VB

Whats relevant here is that I wanted to get new octal sockets at the
time and I could not get hold of a reliable quality supply
of the same look and make I needed 200 to start with and couldn't
source them! (in Western Australia)
I had a few dozen NOS and used ones , but not enough of the same "looks"
as looks were very important too.
Chassis was two 6mm thick anodized Al girder sections milled and
mated,with Al end plates, fold back top cover was blue acrylic with
safety switch
and led lighting dominated the interior....the main market was to be
directed to the HIFI crazies (matching of KT66/88) but would be good for
anyone wanting
accurate data with a valve matching facility....software options were AF
valve range as standard, RF and others optional extras )
An unfortunate accident when moving house, the lack of suitable octal
socket supplies and the then international situation sort of killed it,
but its interesting
to note that octal sockets are still being made
Do you think, then, that the thing could be re activated and sell in
today's market?
Eg for old tubed TEK scopes?

John


Ed Breya
 

There are a lot more uses for octal sockets than just tubes - there are probably millions of them deployed in industrial controls to mount plug-in relays and various function modules that standardized on them long ago. You can get them in different forms too, such as ones that can be attached to a panel surface or even DIN rails, and have screw terminals for wiring the pins.

There is also a variation of the basic tube base/keying system with 11 pins, which allows a 3PDT relay to fit with all leads accessible, or for more complex control modules.

Here are some pictures of various kinds, easily found:

https://www.google.com/search?q=octal+socket+relay&;lr=&hl=en&as_qdr=all&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjV6r-yz-XSAhXLJ5QKHXlUDhAQsAQIngE&biw=1103&bih=758 https://www.google.com/search?q=octal+socket+relay&;lr=&hl=en&as_qdr=all&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjV6r-yz-XSAhXLJ5QKHXlUDhAQsAQIngE&biw=1103&bih=758

So, you can see, the old-school octal socket is alive and well, even if tubes are not so much.

Ed


 

YIKES! I had no idea there were so many non-tube uses for the octal socket
for other than vacuum tubes.

BTW What are impossible to find are plugs (the male counterpart) for all the
tube sockets (the female counterpart) still widely in use. There may be
hundreds of companies making a few styles of sockets (8 pin, 7 pin
miniature, 9 pin miniature, 4 pin, 5 pin, compactron, nuvistor) but there
are absolutely no companies making the corresponding plugs that go into the
sockets. The only plugs you can find are octal.

This is very frustrating and causing me problems. I had to make a plug from
scratch with 9 pieces of 0.041" bus bar and a cylindrical form I placed the
9 pieces of bus bar in and then potted them. It was slow going and it is
very crude. It definitely does not look professional.

For octal plugs you can destroy a dead tube and salvage the octal tube plug.
But that doesn't work for 7 pin miniature and 9 pin miniature tubes. The
pins are encased in the glass of the tube body.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Monday, March 20, 2017 10:46 AM
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek
Semiconductor Curve Trace

There are a lot more uses for octal sockets than just tubes - there are
probably millions of them deployed in industrial controls to mount plug-in
relays and various function modules that standardized on them long ago. You
can get them in different forms too, such as ones that can be attached to a
panel surface or even DIN rails, and have screw terminals for wiring the
pins.

There is also a variation of the basic tube base/keying system with 11 pins,
which allows a 3PDT relay to fit with all leads accessible, or for more
complex control modules.

Here are some pictures of various kinds, easily found:

https://www.google.com/search?q=octal+socket+relay&;lr=&hl=en&as_qdr=all&tbm=
isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjV6r-yz-XSAhXLJ5QKHXlUDhAQsAQIngE&biw
=1103&bih=758
https://www.google.com/search?q=octal+socket+relay&;lr=&hl=en&as_qdr=all&tbm=
isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjV6r-yz-XSAhXLJ5QKHXlUDhAQsAQIngE&biw
=1103&bih=758

So, you can see, the old-school octal socket is alive and well, even if
tubes are not so much.

Ed
------------------------------------
Posted by: edbreya@yahoo.com
------------------------------------


Ed Breya
 

I have seen a few 7 and 9 pin subminiature tube style phenolic or Bakelite plugs over the years, but not recently. I think octal won out as a base for lots of things because it's stout enough to hold larger modules like relays. There have been small parts that used the submini tube base though, like the classic Airpax 175 chopper, which goes in a 7-pin. I also have some small signal transformers packaged similarly - hermetically sealed in a can.

I think you can still get the same 7 and 9 pin glass-metal bases, but they are likely quite expensive compared to plastic plug assemblies. Here's an example series that may be close enough.

http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html

The key to finding these kinds of things is to use "vacuum," "hermetic," or "feedthrough." There are all sorts of connection systems in vacuum work. Even in this arena, octal has been quite successful, and is a common item.

Ed


 

Hi Ed,
Thanks for that link. When I get a chance I will look it over.
One thing that would exclude them from consideration is cost. I suspect
their products are extremely expensive because of their very advanced
capabilities.
Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 10:12 AM
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek
Semiconductor Curve Trace

I have seen a few 7 and 9 pin subminiature tube style phenolic or Bakelite
plugs over the years, but not recently. I think octal won out as a base for
lots of things because it's stout enough to hold larger modules like relays.
There have been small parts that used the submini tube base though, like the
classic Airpax 175 chopper, which goes in a 7-pin. I also have some small
signal transformers packaged similarly - hermetically sealed in a can.

I think you can still get the same 7 and 9 pin glass-metal bases, but they
are likely quite expensive compared to plastic plug assemblies. Here's an
example series that may be close enough.

http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html
http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html

The key to finding these kinds of things is to use "vacuum," "hermetic," or
"feedthrough." There are all sorts of connection systems in vacuum work.
Even in this arena, octal has been quite successful, and is a common item.

Ed
------------------------------------
Posted by: edbreya@yahoo.com
------------------------------------


Ed Breya
 

Yes, be prepared for sticker shock. But these are only glass hermetic, made to solder mount versus braze, so maybe not too too bad if what you need is a standard part. The ultra-high vacuum/temperature rated ones use alumina rather than glass, and are way more expensive.

Ed


Michael A. Terrell
 

Vector used to make 7 & 9 pin plugs. They also sold turret boards and aluminum covers to make plug in modules.

I used to scrap failed 0Z3 rectifiers to build modules in.

-----Original Message-----
From: "edbreya@yahoo.com [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mar 21, 2017 1:11 PM
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek Semiconductor Curve Trace

I have seen a few 7 and 9 pin subminiature tube style phenolic or Bakelite plugs over the years, but not recently. I think octal won out as a base for lots of things because it's stout enough to hold larger modules like relays. There have been small parts that used the submini tube base though, like the classic Airpax 175 chopper, which goes in a 7-pin. I also have some small signal transformers packaged similarly - hermetically sealed in a can.

I think you can still get the same 7 and 9 pin glass-metal bases, but they are likely quite expensive compared to plastic plug assemblies. Here's an example series that may be close enough.

http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html

The key to finding these kinds of things is to use "vacuum," "hermetic," or "feedthrough." There are all sorts of connection systems in vacuum work. Even in this arena, octal has been quite successful, and is a common item.

Ed



Michael A. Terrell


John Gord
 

Try a Google search for "7 pin socket saver". I got some hits. 9 pin socket savers seem to be more common. It looks like at least some of the socket savers could be disassembled.
--John Gord


---In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, <mike.terrell@...> wrote :

Vector used to make 7 & 9 pin plugs. They also sold turret boards and aluminum covers to make plug in modules.

I used to scrap failed 0Z3 rectifiers to build modules in.

-----Original Message-----
>From: "edbreya@... mailto:edbreya@... [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
>Sent: Mar 21, 2017 1:11 PM
>To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
>Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek Semiconductor Curve Trace
>
>I have seen a few 7 and 9 pin subminiature tube style phenolic or Bakelite plugs over the years, but not recently. I think octal won out as a base for lots of things because it's stout enough to hold larger modules like relays. There have been small parts that used the submini tube base though, like the classic Airpax 175 chopper, which goes in a 7-pin. I also have some small signal transformers packaged similarly - hermetically sealed in a can.
>
>I think you can still get the same 7 and 9 pin glass-metal bases, but they are likely quite expensive compared to plastic plug assemblies. Here's an example series that may be close enough.
>
>http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html
>
>The key to finding these kinds of things is to use "vacuum," "hermetic," or "feedthrough." There are all sorts of connection systems in vacuum work. Even in this arena, octal has been quite successful, and is a common item.
>
>Ed
>
>
>


Michael A. Terrell


Richard Solomon <dickw1ksz@...>
 

I have been looking for a 7 pin Socket
Saver for my Tube Tester, no joy yet.

A Google search shows lots of hits, but
none are really 7 pin Socket Savers.

73, Dick, w1KSZ

On Tue, Mar 21, 2017 at 5:05 PM, johngord@verizon.net [TekScopes] <
TekScopes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Try a Google search for "7 pin socket saver". I got some hits. 9 pin
socket savers seem to be more common. It looks like at least some of the
socket savers could be disassembled.
--John Gord


---In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, <mike.terrell@...> wrote :

Vector used to make 7 & 9 pin plugs. They also sold turret boards and
aluminum covers to make plug in modules.

I used to scrap failed 0Z3 rectifiers to build modules in.

-----Original Message-----
From: "edbreya@... mailto:edbreya@... [TekScopes]" <
TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mar 21, 2017 1:11 PM
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek
Semiconductor Curve Trace

I have seen a few 7 and 9 pin subminiature tube style phenolic or
Bakelite plugs over the years, but not recently. I think octal won out as a
base for lots of things because it's stout enough to hold larger modules
like relays. There have been small parts that used the submini tube base
though, like the classic Airpax 175 chopper, which goes in a 7-pin. I also
have some small signal transformers packaged similarly - hermetically
sealed in a can.

I think you can still get the same 7 and 9 pin glass-metal bases, but
they are likely quite expensive compared to plastic plug assemblies. Here's
an example series that may be close enough.

http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html
http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html
http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html
http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html

The key to finding these kinds of things is to use "vacuum," "hermetic,"
or "feedthrough." There are all sorts of connection systems in vacuum work.
Even in this arena, octal has been quite successful, and is a common item.

Ed

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Michael A. Terrell




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Michael A. Terrell
 

I had a full set of socket savers in the early '70s, including the one to measure the cathode current in Horizontal output tubes. :)

-----Original Message-----
From: "johngord@verizon.net [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mar 21, 2017 8:05 PM
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek Semiconductor Curve Trace

Try a Google search for "7 pin socket saver". I got some hits. 9 pin socket savers seem to be more common. It looks like at least some of the socket savers could be disassembled.
--John Gord


---In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, <mike.terrell@...> wrote :

Vector used to make 7 & 9 pin plugs. They also sold turret boards and aluminum covers to make plug in modules.

I used to scrap failed 0Z3 rectifiers to build modules in.
Michael A. Terrell


John Gord
 

How about ebay 282369339062 ? --John Gord


---In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, <dickw1ksz@...> wrote :

I have been looking for a 7 pin Socket
Saver for my Tube Tester, no joy yet.

A Google search shows lots of hits, but
none are really 7 pin Socket Savers.

73, Dick, w1KSZ

On Tue, Mar 21, 2017 at 5:05 PM, johngord@... mailto:johngord@... [TekScopes] <
TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

>
>
> Try a Google search for "7 pin socket saver". I got some hits. 9 pin
> socket savers seem to be more common. It looks like at least some of the
> socket savers could be disassembled.
> --John Gord
>
>
> ---In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, <mike.terrell@...> wrote :
>
> Vector used to make 7 & 9 pin plugs. They also sold tu


Richard Solomon <dickw1ksz@...>
 

True Socket Savers have a small thru
hole screw to mount it to the socket on
the Tube Tester.

Not sure what these things are, but they
are not Socket Savers as I was taught
they should look like.

73, Dick, W1KSZ

On Tue, Mar 21, 2017 at 6:00 PM, johngord@verizon.net [TekScopes] <
TekScopes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



How about ebay 282369339062 ? --John Gord


---In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, <dickw1ksz@...> wrote :

I have been looking for a 7 pin Socket
Saver for my Tube Tester, no joy yet.

A Google search shows lots of hits, but
none are really 7 pin Socket Savers.

73, Dick, w1KSZ

On Tue, Mar 21, 2017 at 5:05 PM, johngord@... mailto:johngord@...
[TekScopes] <
TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:



Try a Google search for "7 pin socket saver". I got some hits. 9 pin
socket savers seem to be more common. It looks like at least some of the
socket savers could be disassembled.
--John Gord


---In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com,
<mike.terrell@...> wrote :

Vector used to make 7 & 9 pin plugs. They also sold tu

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


jim <ab7vf@...>
 

--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 3/21/17, edbreya@yahoo.com [TekScopes] <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek Semiconductor Curve Trace
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, March 21, 2017, 11:44 AM

Yes, be prepared for
sticker shock. But these are only glass hermetic, made to
solder mount versus braze, so maybe not too too bad if what
you need is a standard part. The ultra-high
vacuum/temperature rated ones use alumina rather than glass,
and are way more expensive.
Ed..


I've got several both 7 and 9 pin headers .. the 7 pin are marked VECTOR .. 9 pin are unmarked

Appear to very hard plastic or perhaps baklite

Jim


jim <ab7vf@...>
 

--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 3/21/17, johngord@verizon.net [TekScopes] <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek Semiconductor Curve Trace
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, March 21, 2017, 5:05 PM

Try a Google search for
"7 pin socket saver".  I got some hits.  9 pin
socket savers seem to be more common.  It looks like at
least some of the socket savers could be disassembled.
--John Go


Pomona # 1347 7- pin (Pomona Electronics, Calif)
GC Electronics Cat.No. 1948 9 pin

Both have a long central screw and will come apart

Jim


 

Hi John,
Thanks for the suggestion. I know I kept coming across octal socket savers
all the time but I never saw a 7 pin or 9 pin socket saver. I will give that
a try.
Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 5:06 PM
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek
Semiconductor Curve Trace

Try a Google search for "7 pin socket saver". I got some hits. 9 pin
socket savers seem to be more common. It looks like at least some of the
socket savers could be disassembled.
--John Gord


---In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, <mike.terrell@...> wrote :

Vector used to make 7 & 9 pin plugs. They also sold turret boards and
aluminum covers to make plug in modules.

I used to scrap failed 0Z3 rectifiers to build modules in.

-----Original Message-----
>From: "edbreya@... mailto:edbreya@... [TekScopes]"
<TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
>Sent: Mar 21, 2017 1:11 PM
>To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
>Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek
Semiconductor Curve Trace > >I have seen a few 7 and 9 pin subminiature
tube style phenolic or Bakelite plugs over the years, but not recently. I
think octal won out as a base for lots of things because it's stout enough
to hold larger modules like relays. There have been small parts that used
the submini tube base though, like the classic Airpax 175 chopper, which
goes in a 7-pin. I also have some small signal transformers packaged
similarly - hermetically sealed in a can.
>
>I think you can still get the same 7 and 9 pin glass-metal bases, but they
are likely quite expensive compared to plastic plug assemblies. Here's an
example series that may be close enough.
>
>http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html
http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html
http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html
http://www.detoronics.com/multi-terminal-headers.html
>
>The key to finding these kinds of things is to use "vacuum," "hermetic,"
or "feedthrough." There are all sorts of connection systems in vacuum work.
Even in this arena, octal has been quite successful, and is a common item.
>
>Ed
>
Michael A. Terrell
------------------------------------
Posted by: johngord@verizon.net
------------------------------------


Bill (Doc) Courtright
 

Dennis and all,
Has everyone been overlooking the best source for tubes and related hardware?

https://www.tubesandmore.com/products/tube_accessories
Bill
KB3DKS

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Dennis Tillman' dennis@ridesoft.com [TekScopes] <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: TekScopes <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wed, Mar 22, 2017 10:06 am
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek Semiconductor Curve Trace

Hi John,
Thanks for the suggestion. I know I kept coming across octal socket savers
all the time but I never saw a 7 pin or 9 pin socket saver. I will give that
a try.
Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 5:06 PM
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek
Semiconductor Curve Trace

Try a Google search for "7 pin socket saver". I got some hits. 9 pin
socket savers seem to be more common. It looks like at least some of the
socket savers could be disassembled.
--John Gord


 

Hi Bill,
In my case I needed tube PLUGS that would plug into a tube SOCKET. That is
my problem.

I am well aware of Tubesandmore. They certainly have a nice selection of 4
pin, 5 pin, 7 pin, 8 pin , and 9 pin tube SOCKETS. Unfortunately other than
8 pin tube PLUGS they, or anyone else for that matter, do not sell 7 pin
miniature tube PLUGS or 9 pin miniature PLUGS. Since 7 pin miniature tubes
and 9 pin miniature tubes have their pins coming right out of the glass
envelope this will make it very hard to get what I need by smashing spent
tubes to try and get an intact set of pins around the base of the tube.

As John Gord pointed out one way to find some of these is by searching for
socket savers. They, too, are scarce these days. Not many people are
designing things with tubes. There was a 9 pin and a 7 pin socket saver
auction on Ebay and I bid $28 for them but someone outbid me. I have no way
to know how high that person's ultimate bid might have been.

Dennis Tillman, W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 5:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek
Semiconductor Curve Trace

Dennis and all,
Has everyone been overlooking the best source for tubes and related
hardware?

https://www.tubesandmore.com/products/tube_accessories
Bill
KB3DKS

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Dennis Tillman' dennis@ridesoft.com [TekScopes]
<TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wed, Mar 22, 2017 10:06 am

Hi John,
Thanks for the suggestion. I know I kept coming across octal socket savers
all the time but I never saw a 7 pin or 9 pin socket saver. I will give that
a try.
Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 5:06 PM
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek
Semiconductor Curve Trace

Try a Google search for "7 pin socket saver". I got some hits. 9 pin
socket savers seem to be more common. It looks like at least some of the
socket savers could be disassembled.
--John Gord
------------------------------------
Posted by: Doxemf <doxemf@aol.com>
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Bill (Doc) Courtright
 

Dennis,
They have the 9 pin Socket Savers. I did not see any 7 pin. Quite awhile ago there were some cheap car stereo players, maybe eve 8 tracks, I forget, I serviced them once. Anyway, they used a 9 pin male/female connector. I think that the old Calrad or similar brand offered the cable sets. Fair Radio used to have some as well. Someone with a 3D printer could probably spit a bunch out that way. Just have to provide the pins.
Bill, KB3DKS

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Dennis Tillman' dennis@ridesoft.com [TekScopes] <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: TekScopes <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sun, Mar 26, 2017 10:46 pm
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek Semiconductor Curve Trace

Hi Bill,
In my case I needed tube PLUGS that would plug into a tube SOCKET. That is
my problem.

I am well aware of Tubesandmore. They certainly have a nice selection of 4
pin, 5 pin, 7 pin, 8 pin , and 9 pin tube SOCKETS. Unfortunately other than
8 pin tube PLUGS they, or anyone else for that matter, do not sell 7 pin
miniature tube PLUGS or 9 pin miniature PLUGS. Since 7 pin miniature tubes
and 9 pin miniature tubes have their pins coming right out of the glass
envelope this will make it very hard to get what I need by smashing spent
tubes to try and get an intact set of pins around the base of the tube.

As John Gord pointed out one way to find some of these is by searching for
socket savers. They, too, are scarce these days. Not many people are
designing things with tubes. There was a 9 pin and a 7 pin socket saver
auction on Ebay and I bid $28 for them but someone outbid me. I have no way
to know how high that person's ultimate bid might have been.

Dennis Tillman, W7PF

-----Original Message-----
Sent: Sunday, March 26, 2017 5:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Re: A Vacuum Tube Curve Tracer for all Tek
Semiconductor Curve Trace

Dennis and all,
Has everyone been overlooking the best source for tubes and related
hardware?

https://www.tubesandmore.com/products/tube_accessories
Bill
KB3DKS