Cleaning the front of the scope


David Berlind
 

Easy question (hopefully) for everyone: the front of 466 that I picked up a few weeks back could use a good cleaning around all the controls, dials, levers, etc. Any recommendations for what to use to make it all purty again without damaging it?


While we're at it, I picked up a Simpson 260 Series 6 multimeter that has adhesive stuck to the plastic (or is that glass?) "window" that's over the movement. I'm guessing it's from a price tag. I'll gladly take suggestions on getting that off too (without damaging anything).


Tom Jobe <tomjobe@...>
 

An old toothbrush and some window cleaner such as the 'Windex' brand
does a great job on the general dirt and grime, but be sure the markings
on the clear plastic knob skirts for your model are safe around water
based cleaners. As an example, many 22xx scope clear plastic knob skirt
markings are NOT safe around these cleaning solutions.
For the sticky labels and dried up masking tape, a citrus based cleaner
will work wonders. They don't work quickly, so just put some on and let
it do it's magic at its own pace.
The citrus based cleaners are very safe on plastic windows and on every
other surface I've tried them on. The best citrus based cleaners I've
bought came from a bicycle shop that sold supplies to clean a bike.
tom jobe...

On 2/22/2017 3:55 PM, david@berlind.org [TekScopes] wrote:

Easy question (hopefully) for everyone: the front of 466 that I picked
up a few weeks back could use a good cleaning around all the controls,
dials, levers, etc. Any recommendations for what to use to make it all
purty again without damaging it?


While we're at it, I picked up a Simpson 260 Series 6 multimeter that
has adhesive stuck to the plastic (or is that glass?) "window" that's
over the movement. I'm guessing it's from a price tag. I'll gladly
take suggestions on getting that off too (without damaging anything).




n4buq
 

GooGone is one of those citrus-based cleaners. Works well and available at places like WalMart, etc.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Jobe tomjobe@gmail.com [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 6:44:21 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Cleaning the front of the scope

An old toothbrush and some window cleaner such as the 'Windex' brand
does a great job on the general dirt and grime, but be sure the markings
on the clear plastic knob skirts for your model are safe around water
based cleaners. As an example, many 22xx scope clear plastic knob skirt
markings are NOT safe around these cleaning solutions.
For the sticky labels and dried up masking tape, a citrus based cleaner
will work wonders. They don't work quickly, so just put some on and let
it do it's magic at its own pace.
The citrus based cleaners are very safe on plastic windows and on every
other surface I've tried them on. The best citrus based cleaners I've
bought came from a bicycle shop that sold supplies to clean a bike.
tom jobe...




On 2/22/2017 3:55 PM, david@berlind.org [TekScopes] wrote:

Easy question (hopefully) for everyone: the front of 466 that I picked
up a few weeks back could use a good cleaning around all the controls,
dials, levers, etc. Any recommendations for what to use to make it all
purty again without damaging it?


While we're at it, I picked up a Simpson 260 Series 6 multimeter that
has adhesive stuck to the plastic (or is that glass?) "window" that's
over the movement. I'm guessing it's from a price tag. I'll gladly
take suggestions on getting that off too (without damaging anything).









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Yahoo Groups Links




 

I like using water with a little bit of dish soap or TSP in it and a
soft cloth. I usually remove the controls so I can get under them.

If the faceplate is screen printed aluminum, then solvents can be used
is the soapy water is not good enough. Naphtha (lighter fluid) is
safe on most plastics.

On 22 Feb 2017 23:55:56 +0000, you wrote:

Easy question (hopefully) for everyone: the front of 466 that I picked up a few weeks back could use a good cleaning around all the controls, dials, levers, etc. Any recommendations for what to use to make it all purty again without damaging it?

While we're at it, I picked up a Simpson 260 Series 6 multimeter that has adhesive stuck to the plastic (or is that glass?) "window" that's over the movement. I'm guessing it's from a price tag. I'll gladly take suggestions on getting that off too (without damaging anything).


Michael A. Terrell
 

Use it sparingly on the meter glass. Many, if all of these movements are not sealed. I would put a few drops on a cotton ball and lay it on the old adhesive. Don't leave it next to the meter bezel, or it will be sucked into the crack. It might not damage the meter scale, but I wouldn't risk it.

-----Original Message-----
From: "Barry n4buq@knology.net [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Feb 22, 2017 8:17 PM
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Cleaning the front of the scope

GooGone is one of those citrus-based cleaners. Works well and available at places like WalMart, etc.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Jobe tomjobe@gmail.com [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 6:44:21 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Cleaning the front of the scope

An old toothbrush and some window cleaner such as the 'Windex' brand
does a great job on the general dirt and grime, but be sure the markings
on the clear plastic knob skirts for your model are safe around water
based cleaners. As an example, many 22xx scope clear plastic knob skirt
markings are NOT safe around these cleaning solutions.
For the sticky labels and dried up masking tape, a citrus based cleaner
will work wonders. They don't work quickly, so just put some on and let
it do it's magic at its own pace.
The citrus based cleaners are very safe on plastic windows and on every
other surface I've tried them on. The best citrus based cleaners I've
bought came from a bicycle shop that sold supplies to clean a bike.
tom jobe...




On 2/22/2017 3:55 PM, david@berlind.org [TekScopes] wrote:

Easy question (hopefully) for everyone: the front of 466 that I picked
up a few weeks back could use a good cleaning around all the controls,
dials, levers, etc. Any recommendations for what to use to make it all
purty again without damaging it?


While we're at it, I picked up a Simpson 260 Series 6 multimeter that
has adhesive stuck to the plastic (or is that glass?) "window" that's
over the movement. I'm guessing it's from a price tag. I'll gladly
take suggestions on getting that off too (without damaging anything).

Michael A. Terrell


n4buq
 

IIRC, the 260 comes apart quite readily and cleaning the window on both sides is pretty easy.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "'Michael A. Terrell' mike.terrell@earthlink.net [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 7:33:01 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Cleaning the front of the scope

Use it sparingly on the meter glass. Many, if all of these movements are not
sealed. I would put a few drops on a cotton ball and lay it on the old
adhesive. Don't leave it next to the meter bezel, or it will be sucked into
the crack. It might not damage the meter scale, but I wouldn't risk it.

-----Original Message-----
From: "Barry n4buq@knology.net [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Feb 22, 2017 8:17 PM
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Cleaning the front of the scope

GooGone is one of those citrus-based cleaners. Works well and available at
places like WalMart, etc.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Jobe tomjobe@gmail.com [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2017 6:44:21 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Cleaning the front of the scope

An old toothbrush and some window cleaner such as the 'Windex' brand
does a great job on the general dirt and grime, but be sure the markings
on the clear plastic knob skirts for your model are safe around water
based cleaners. As an example, many 22xx scope clear plastic knob skirt
markings are NOT safe around these cleaning solutions.
For the sticky labels and dried up masking tape, a citrus based cleaner
will work wonders. They don't work quickly, so just put some on and let
it do it's magic at its own pace.
The citrus based cleaners are very safe on plastic windows and on every
other surface I've tried them on. The best citrus based cleaners I've
bought came from a bicycle shop that sold supplies to clean a bike.
tom jobe...




On 2/22/2017 3:55 PM, david@berlind.org [TekScopes] wrote:

Easy question (hopefully) for everyone: the front of 466 that I picked
up a few weeks back could use a good cleaning around all the controls,
dials, levers, etc. Any recommendations for what to use to make it all
purty again without damaging it?


While we're at it, I picked up a Simpson 260 Series 6 multimeter that
has adhesive stuck to the plastic (or is that glass?) "window" that's
over the movement. I'm guessing it's from a price tag. I'll gladly
take suggestions on getting that off too (without damaging anything).

Michael A. Terrell


David Berlind
 

Thank you (as usual) to everybody for your helpful replies. Fortunately, I am a cyclist and have a big bottle of the citrus cleaner in my garage (for cleaning my chains). And I like @MichaelT's cotton ball approach and am thinking that I can not only follow that approach for making sure none of the cleaner gets into the movement (should I choose not to open the 260 up... see below), I'm also thinking that I can use a cotton ball and Windex on the front of the 466 to neatly clean and to avoid damage to the control skirts. Referring to @David's response, I wonder whether the front of the 466 is "printed aluminum" or not. How do I tell?

More than likely, I will end up opening the 260 to deal with a calibration issue. When it arrived after purchase "for repair or parts" from eBay, the movement would swing about a 1/2 inch before stopping and it would stick in that position until I jarred it loose with a hard finger tap on the top of the unit. Upon closer inspection, I noticed the needle was making contact with some bent shielding foil on the "window" plate side, near the bottom of the movement. So, I took it apart, smoothed out the shielding foil, and now, the needle's path is unobstructed.


Next, I checked the calibration and, on voltage, it's pretty good (so, I scored a great vintage meter for $40). Actually, a bit better on higher DC voltage than with lower voltage. I'm afraid if I recalibrate for better lower voltage readings, I will throw-off the better readings on the higher voltage (suggestions welcome). But the one thing that I noticed after putting it back together is that the ohmmeter is pretty far off. If I try to "zero" the ohms with the "zero ohms" knob, I can't get it to zero. Does anyone know if ohms can be calibrated through the back of the knob or some other way? I couldn't find much on the Web. If so, then, maybe I'll deal with cleaning the window while I have it apart.


Thanks all!


n4buq
 

You might find this site helpful.

http://www.simpson260.com/

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "david@berlind.org [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 8:10:19 AM
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: Cleaning the front of the scope

Thank you (as usual) to everybody for your helpful replies. Fortunately, I am
a cyclist and have a big bottle of the citrus cleaner in my garage (for
cleaning my chains). And I like @MichaelT's cotton ball approach and am
thinking that I can not only follow that approach for making sure none of
the cleaner gets into the movement (should I choose not to open the 260
up... see below), I'm also thinking that I can use a cotton ball and Windex
on the front of the 466 to neatly clean and to avoid damage to the control
skirts. Referring to @David's response, I wonder whether the front of the
466 is "printed aluminum" or not. How do I tell?

More than likely, I will end up opening the 260 to deal with a calibration
issue. When it arrived after purchase "for repair or parts" from eBay, the
movement would swing about a 1/2 inch before stopping and it would stick in
that position until I jarred it loose with a hard finger tap on the top of
the unit. Upon closer inspection, I noticed the needle was making contact
with some bent shielding foil on the "window" plate side, near the bottom
of the movement. So, I took it apart, smoothed out the shielding foil, and
now, the needle's path is unobstructed.


Next, I checked the calibration and, on voltage, it's pretty good (so, I
scored a great vintage meter for $40). Actually, a bit better on higher DC
voltage than with lower voltage. I'm afraid if I recalibrate for better
lower voltage readings, I will throw-off the better readings on the higher
voltage (suggestions welcome). But the one thing that I noticed after
putting it back together is that the ohmmeter is pretty far off. If I try
to "zero" the ohms with the "zero ohms" knob, I can't get it to zero. Does
anyone know if ohms can be calibrated through the back of the knob or some
other way? I couldn't find much on the Web. If so, then, maybe I'll deal
with cleaning the window while I have it apart.


Thanks all!










David Berlind
 

Yes, thanks @Barry... I've looked there.. the only thing I can find about
the zero ohms not working is to replace the batteries which I have done.
The batteries are brand new. I can't find anything about calibrating ohms.
Could it be a bad resistor that's letting too much voltage through? I'm not
desperate to have the ohmmeter part working perfectly. But it would be
cool.


n4buq
 

The manuals for many of the versions of the 260 are there and those include the schematic. Make sure you get the correct manual for your particular meter.

There are calibration manuals there as well. Someone may have moved some of the internal pots or you could have a bad component. Hard to say...

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "David Berlind david@berlind.org [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, February 23, 2017 8:38:32 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Re: Cleaning the front of the scope

Yes, thanks @Barry... I've looked there.. the only thing I can find about
the zero ohms not working is to replace the batteries which I have done.
The batteries are brand new. I can't find anything about calibrating ohms.
Could it be a bad resistor that's letting too much voltage through? I'm not
desperate to have the ohmmeter part working perfectly. But it would be
cool.





Clive Redfern <semiochemic@...>
 

I've not been following this thread, so sorry if what I've written repeats or compromises what went before.My quick scan gave me 'citrus cleaner'/'cleaning front of scope' and got my attention.
The "citrus cleaner" is probably the terpene 'dipentene', the racemic version of D or L-Limonene..... although it could be the natural (D) version, a by-product of citrus oil production.
Your chemical ref will give you Irritant (X) and hazard codes R 10-38-43-80/83 S 24-37-80-81 RETECS# GW6360000, flash point 43°C

It is an excellent, less toxic, broad spectrum oil/wax/grease solvent.It is relatively good pain stripper and penetrates a range of plastics, ripping out the plasticizer and does a really good job wrecking rubber- going in interstitially and eliminating all those hydrogen bonds which kept it in one piece.A whole range of pharma plastics didn't survive my tests. Autoclave ok, Terpenes no. Some of them looked ok but fell apart when handled.One out of 10 different steel drum lacquers survived. It also does a fairly good job of removing the fat/oil from skin....and wrecks ordinary, household rubber.....rubber literally falls apart....gloves in minutes. Industrial grade neoprene is more resistant.Even some grades of polythene inserts in a plastic caps for glass bottles died after a time.
My Kaptan tape survived ...but not its adhesive.

I've worked with this stuff and most of its acolytes for well over 50 years.
I use  it (if not in perfumery and flavoring) to strip everything off.I would not suggest that you use it on the front of anything you value.
And take your watch off. The crystal and seals may not survive. 
Clive

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David Berlind
 

Yike @Clive. Thanks for the heads up.

Glad I didn't try the citrus cleaner yet. Someone mentioned WD-40 for the
meter window. And @DavidW mentioned naptha (lighter fluid). So, I guess
I'm down to those two. Any votes, comments, confirmations, denials?


Brent Watson <brentleew2003@...>
 

I love the citrus cleaners, but they are too strong for general purpose scope cleaning in my opinion.Need to watch out for that ammonia based cleaner ie. windex on the rectangular off white buttons on the scopes as previously mentioned.


David Berlind
 

thanks @brent. The citrus cleaner angle had to do with another question I
tossed in about cleaning the lense (the window) on a Simpson 260 multimeter
(in case anyone happened to know).


Dave Daniel
 

I only use water, water with a bit of dish detergent, mineral spirits
and isopropyl alcohol and/or a heat gun to clean up instruments, in that
order. If plain water doesn't work, I add some detergent and try again.
If that doesn't work, I try IPA, etc., etc.

For the sides, panels, etc., I try mineral spirits or IPA to soften the
adhesive on stickers, letting the solvent soak into the edges of the
adhesive for a few minutes and then attempting to pry up the sticker
with a piece of wood (orange stick or toothpick). Sometimes that works -
just add more solvent to soak further into the edge of the adhesive. If
that doesn't work, gently heating the sticker (particularly metal foil
calibration stickers) often loosens the adhesive. I never use razor
blades or modeler's knives to try and pry off stickers. For general
cleaning of the sides, side panels, etc., (i.e.., areas other than the
front panel), I'll use water, or water with detergent, or IPA or mineral
spirits, in that order and being very careful with the latter two. I
have successfully used Professional Brewer's Wash (normally used to
clean homebrewing equipment) to remove tobacco and other organic
coatings, but I've also had PBW partially dissolve the paint used on the
SB series of Heathkit radios, so I am very careful with PBW. It works
well, though, on Tektronix and HP housings and panels.

For front panels, and depending on how dirty they are, I will move all
of the controls to a known position, usually fully CCW or fully to the
right, and take a photo of the front panel. Then, as David suggested, I
remove all of the knobs and soak them in water with dish detergent.
Later I clean these using a tooth brush. For the front panel itself,
it's back to water, water with detergent, or IPA or mineral spirits,
again in that order. I have had some disappointments here and there -
IPA will completely dissolve the white lettering off of some older HP
equipment knobs and off of some front panel markings where the lettering
is painted on instead of etched into the metal. The disappointments have
been few and far between.

The main things are to test whatever you are going to use, particularly
solvents, on an unimportant area of whatever you are trying to clean,
being patient with letting solvents (even water) soak for a bit, and not
overdoing it wit anything liquid. I find that the use of cotton-tipped
swabs works well in small areas, and that those really soft brushes used
by women to apply makeup work well as dust brushes if one cuts the
bristles down to a half or a quarter of an inch.

DaveD

On 2/23/2017 11:37 AM, Brent Watson brentleew2003@yahoo.com [TekScopes]
wrote:

I love the citrus cleaners, but they are too strong for general
purpose scope cleaning in my opinion.Need to watch out for that
ammonia based cleaner ie. windex on the rectangular off white buttons
on the scopes as previously mentioned.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Ted Rook
 

I find isopropyl alcohol an excellent general purpose cleaning agent, it is a very mild solvent
and usually contains some water so it removes both oily and water-based stains. I have yet to
find a plastic that is upset by it. For more stubborn stains you might try naphta (lighter fluid) it
is a stronger solvent and useful where there are greasy residues, I believe it to be mostly
plastic safe but test before use.

Ted Rook

On 23 Feb 2017 at 10:16, David Berlind david@berlind.org [TekScopesRe: [TekScopes] Re:
Cleaning the front of the sco wrote:


Yike @Clive. Thanks for the heads up.

Glad I didn't try the citrus cleaner yet. Someone mentioned WD-40 for the
meter window. And @DavidW mentioned naptha (lighter fluid). So, I guess
I'm down to those two. Any votes, comments, confirmations, denials?

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


 

I have had good results cleaning and restoring screens and plastic bezels with Smitty's Glass Wax. It says it removes oil and muck and polishes. It says it is alcohol and ammonia free. It has a 100 percent money back warranty - I am finding more uses for this stuff all the time. I work a small quantity in with my finger(S) and finish in straight lateral strokes as it dries then buff with a soft lense cloth. Also it doesn't layer-each new coat removes the previous layer. Hope this helps. LEE



Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID

"David Berlind david@berlind.org [TekScopes]" <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

thanks @brent. The citrus cleaner angle had to do with another question I
tossed in about cleaning the lense (the window) on a Simpson 260 multimeter
(in case anyone happened to know).





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Clive Redfern <semiochemic@...>
 

Hi David,
Ask a friend in the industry if some Decon-90 or RBS-25 (there are others) can be made available.These almost residue free industrial detergents are used as 2-3% aqueous solutions and are used for decontamination - ☣ and ☢ as well as cleaning all that really tacky gunge that even 'Chromic acid' has a problem with....and they are relatively kind to your hands.
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I would caution against using Windex or other glass cleaners to clean vintage equipment as it includes ammonia in the formulation which can also remove some of the painted markings on the instrument. I collect and buy/sell vintage photo gear and encountered this problem when the glass cleaner I was using partially removed the markings on some of my lenses. I would suggest using straight isopropanol alcohol instead.


David Berlind
 

And here I though this was going to be easy.