Compactron tubes in HP or Tek instruments?


Daniel Koller
 

Howdy all,

  I'm going through my dad's collection of vacuum tubes and sorting through them.   I have a large number of used (pulls) "Compactron" type receiving tubes, and a smaller number of NIB Compactrons, as well as other tubes specific to TV sets of the day (1960's I presume).

   I'm thinking of unloading all of these cheaply on e-bay or some such thing, but before I do, are there any of them that I should save?  Are there any specific Compactron tubes that were used in later tube-era HP or Tek (or any other manufacturer's) instruments that I should keep in stock in the event I come across such an instrument some day?

  I'd rather get these into the hands of someone who will use them rather than store them.

  Dan


bonddaleena@...
 

Hi Dan, one of the tubes types that I purchased a bunch of spares for, were the Nuvistor series. 6CW4, 6DS4, etc. These can bring low or high prices on eBay, depending on your 'salesmanship'....Can't say that I have anything that use the 'compactrons'...... You can always use eBay's 'completed' listings for any tube type. This will give you a good idea what they are 'worth'....

ron
N4UE



-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Koller
To: TekScopes ; hp_agilent_equipment
Sent: Thu, Jan 30, 2014 3:38 pm
Subject: [TekScopes] Compactron tubes in HP or Tek instruments?

 
Howdy all,

  I'm going through my dad's collection of vacuum tubes and sorting through them.   I have a large number of used (pulls) "Compactron" type receiving tubes, and a smaller number of NIB Compactrons, as well as other tubes specific to TV sets of the day (1960's I presume).

   I'm thinking of unloading all of these cheaply on e-bay or some such thing, but before I do, are there any of them that I should save?  Are there any specific Compactron tubes that were used in later tube-era HP or Tek (or any other manufacturer's) instruments that I should keep in stock in the event I come across such an instrument some day?

  I'd rather get these into the hands of someone who will use them rather than store them.

  Dan


Daniel Koller
 

Definitely no Nuvistors in the lot.  Those I would pull out as a matter of course, and they are easy enough to store.

Dan

On Thursday, January 30, 2014 4:24 PM, "bonddaleena@aol.com" <bonddaleena@aol.com> wrote:

 
Hi Dan, one of the tubes types that I purchased a bunch of spares for, were the Nuvistor series. 6CW4, 6DS4, etc. These can bring low or high prices on eBay, depending on your 'salesmanship'....Can't say that I have anything that use the 'compactrons'...... You can always use eBay's 'completed' listings for any tube type. This will give you a good idea what they are 'worth'....

ron
N4UE







-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Koller <kaboomdk@yahoo.com>
To: TekScopes <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>; hp_agilent_equipment <hp_agilent_equipment@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Jan 30, 2014 3:38 pm
Subject: [TekScopes] Compactron tubes in HP or Tek instruments?


 
Howdy all,


  I'm going through my dad's collection of vacuum tubes and sorting through them.   I have a large number of used (pulls) "Compactron" type receiving tubes, and a smaller number of NIB Compactrons, as well as other tubes specific to TV sets of the day (1960's I presume).


   I'm thinking of unloading all of these cheaply on e-bay or some such thing, but before I do, are there any of them that I should save?  Are there any specific Compactron tubes that were used in later tube-era HP or Tek (or any other manufacturer's) instruments that I should keep in stock in the event I come across such an instrument some day?


  I'd rather get these into the hands of someone who will use them rather than store them.


  Dan





Christopher Hilton-Johnson
 

I 'think' that the 547 used a compactatron and the 556 used several. No current access to manuals or to the scopes & memory is not what it was.

Chris HJ

On 30/01/2014 15:38, Daniel Koller wrote:
 
Howdy all,

  I'm going through my dad's collection of vacuum tubes and sorting through them.   I have a large number of used (pulls) "Compactron" type receiving tubes, and a smaller number of NIB Compactrons, as well as other tubes specific to TV sets of the day (1960's I presume).

   I'm thinking of unloading all of these cheaply on e-bay or some such thing, but before I do, are there any of them that I should save?  Are there any specific Compactron tubes that were used in later tube-era HP or Tek (or any other manufacturer's) instruments that I should keep in stock in the event I come across such an instrument some day?

  I'd rather get these into the hands of someone who will use them rather than store them.

  Dan



ditter2
 

I don't think any are used in the vertical amplifiers of either the 547 or 556 (which are nearly identical designs BTW), as these are all transistorized, except the first stage cathode follower which is a 12AT7.  The other tubes in the 547 are all single and dual sided tubes commonly used in several Tek scopes.


The 556 uses two 6M11 triple triodes, one in each sweep generator.


There is a novel miller integrator sweep generator design which can be implemented as a one tube design using a combination pentode-triode tube.  The Miller integrator itself is named a "Phastastitron" short for fantastic.  This cleaver design uses a single pentode for all of the functions of the sweep generator, including the cut off diodes and synchronization (rather than triggered operation.) The screens are used as additional grids in this design.  The triode serves as a cathode follower, to prevent the external load from altering the timing linearity.  Tek never used this design, as all Tek scopes have triggered rather than synchronized to the input signal.  It is useful if you want to design one of those “three tube scopes”.

 

- Steve


Don Black <donald_black@...>
 

I think the 6M11 is a dual triode Pentode.

Don Black.

On 31-Jan-14 5:13 PM, ditter2@... wrote:
 

I don't think any are used in the vertical amplifiers of either the 547 or 556 (which are nearly identical designs BTW), as these are all transistorized, except the first stage cathode follower which is a 12AT7.  The other tubes in the 547 are all single and dual sided tubes commonly used in several Tek scopes.


The 556 uses two 6M11 triple triodes, one in each sweep generator.


There is a novel miller integrator sweep generator design which can be implemented as a one tube design using a combination pentode-triode tube.  The Miller integrator itself is named a "Phastastitron" short for fantastic.  This cleaver design uses a single pentode for all of the functions of the sweep generator, including the cut off diodes and synchronization (rather than triggered operation.) The screens are used as additional grids in this design.  The triode serves as a cathode follower, to prevent the external load from altering the timing linearity.  Tek never used this design, as all Tek scopes have triggered rather than synchronized to the input signal.  It is useful if you want to design one of those “three tube scopes”.

 

- Steve





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I looked through the 547 schematics and parts list and did not find any
compactrons.

Tektronix had part numbers for the 6GF5 beam power pentode and 6M11 twin triode
pentode and going by the parts list, the 556 used three 6M11s and two 6GF5s.

I remember that testing compactrons on a tube tester was interesting because
each element was listed separately.

On 30 Jan 2014 22:13:45 -0800, you wrote:

I don't think any are used in the vertical amplifiers of either the 547 or 556 (which are nearly identical designs BTW), as these are all transistorized, except the first stage cathode follower which is a 12AT7. The other tubes in the 547 are all single and dual sided tubes commonly used in several Tek scopes.


The 556 uses two 6M11 triple triodes, one in each sweep generator.

There is a novel miller integrator sweep generator design which can be implemented as a one tube design using a combination pentode-triode tube. The Miller integrator itself is named a "Phastastitron" short for fantastic. This cleaver design uses a single pentode for all of the functions of the sweep generator, including the cut off diodes and synchronization (rather than triggered operation.) The screens are used as additional grids in this design. The triode serves as a cathode follower, to prevent the external load from altering the timing linearity. Tek never used this design, as all Tek scopes have triggered rather than synchronized to the input signal. It is useful if you want to design one of those “three tube scopes”.

- Steve


caveteursus
 

Not HP, but the Eico harmonic distortion analyzer used a compactron.

I will take compactrons off your hands if you have no need of them.