Hacking the Hakko 808


mosaicmerc
 

Well...I couldn't resist.....

So now there's a 10K resistor in line with the tip ground....in case I forget something on while desoldering.

AND now...there's a hidden flashing LED illuminating the replaceable tube canister from beneath!
No more forgetting the Hakko on.

If u want to add an LED...a 1k ohm inline with pins 7 (+ve) and pin 5 (-ve) on the 8 pin IC inside the Hakko delivers 9 mA to the LED.

Embedding the LED required slotting the plastic a little with a dremel grinding wheel. The 5mm LED fits snug in a ready made channel in the handle but u need slots to pass the wires and a slot for the LED to shoot light up into the solder canister!.

The mod is invisible, took 15 mins. Appears factory made!


stefan_trethan
 

So now if the heater fails shorted to ground you have a live tip, well done.

I can see how one would want a high impedance ground on an iron
powered from a low voltage transformer, but on a high voltage heater
it's just unsafe.

Personally I keep even the low voltage irons grounded, if I forget
something I prefer to let the iron take the hit rather than my other
hand which may feed solder or hold components.

ST

On Wed, May 29, 2013 at 6:02 AM, mosaicmerc <mosaicmerc@yahoo.com> wrote:
Well...I couldn't resist.....

So now there's a 10K resistor in line with the tip ground....in case I forget something on while desoldering.

AND now...there's a hidden flashing LED illuminating the replaceable tube canister from beneath!
No more forgetting the Hakko on.

If u want to add an LED...a 1k ohm inline with pins 7 (+ve) and pin 5 (-ve) on the 8 pin IC inside the Hakko delivers 9 mA to the LED.

Embedding the LED required slotting the plastic a little with a dremel grinding wheel. The 5mm LED fits snug in a ready made channel in the handle but u need slots to pass the wires and a slot for the LED to shoot light up into the solder canister!.

The mod is invisible, took 15 mins. Appears factory made!





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Michael A. Terrell
 

mosaicmerc wrote:

Well...I couldn't resist.....

So now there's a 10K resistor in line with the tip ground....in case I forget something on while desoldering.

AND now...there's a hidden flashing LED illuminating the replaceable tube canister from beneath!
No more forgetting the Hakko on.

If u want to add an LED...a 1k ohm inline with pins 7 (+ve) and pin 5 (-ve) on the 8 pin IC inside the Hakko delivers 9 mA to the LED.

Embedding the LED required slotting the plastic a little with a dremel grinding wheel. The 5mm LED fits snug in a ready made channel in the handle but u need slots to pass the wires and a slot for the LED to shoot light up into the solder canister!.

The mod is invisible, took 15 mins. Appears factory made!
Soldering irons were replaced if they couldn't maintain under three ohms to ground on our production line. Above three ohms, they were no longer considered ESD safe. It was fun calibrating 150+ soldering irons every 90 days. :(

Use a timer. Even better, add a switch to your workbench to shut off all the outlets. I've also used a small contactor to shut down a workbench in case of a power failure. This prevents power spikes caused by multiple hits from a recloser as the utility tries to restore power.


mosaicmerc
 

All my soldering irons are ungrounded.....been soldering some 30 years now. Never blew a chip.

Gotten zapped by 120VAC for all sorts of other reasons.....never by a soldering iron. Most recently a chinese PC PSU zapped me, o well. I wan't soldering btw.

When working on battery backed SRAM etc, u don't want to accidentally ground the battery and kill the memory.

THE LED has nothing to do with the 10K to ground, ergo, I don't need a timer and I know if the Hakko is on and won't accidentally burn myself. A timer won't tell u that....it's on the 120VAC socket somewhere else....

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell@...> wrote:

mosaicmerc wrote:

Well...I couldn't resist.....

So now there's a 10K resistor in line with the tip ground....in case I
forget something on while desoldering.

AND now...there's a hidden flashing LED illuminating the replaceable
tube canister from beneath!
No more forgetting the Hakko on.

If u want to add an LED...a 1k ohm inline with pins 7 (+ve) and pin 5
(-ve) on the 8 pin IC inside the Hakko delivers 9 mA to the LED.

Embedding the LED required slotting the plastic a little with a dremel
grinding wheel. The 5mm LED fits snug in a ready made channel in the
handle but u need slots to pass the wires and a slot for the LED to
shoot light up into the solder canister!.

The mod is invisible, took 15 mins. Appears factory made!
Soldering irons were replaced if they couldn't maintain under three
ohms to ground on our production line. Above three ohms, they were no
longer considered ESD safe. It was fun calibrating 150+ soldering irons
every 90 days. :(

Use a timer. Even better, add a switch to your workbench to shut
off all the outlets. I've also used a small contactor to shut down a
workbench in case of a power failure. This prevents power spikes caused
by multiple hits from a recloser as the utility tries to restore power.


stefan_trethan
 

Of course you are welcome to remove the protective ground from any
appliance you like, I'm just saying.....

The timer I wouldn't much like either, but a big central switch is
very useful on a bench, ideally with magnetic latch so it doesn't come
on after a power outage.

There are those times when nothing works and you have had enough, it
is very satisfying to just punch the off switch and walk away. Of
course it also eliminates forgetting something on regular days ;-).

ST

On Wed, May 29, 2013 at 7:02 PM, mosaicmerc <mosaicmerc@yahoo.com> wrote:
All my soldering irons are ungrounded.....been soldering some 30 years now. Never blew a chip.

Gotten zapped by 120VAC for all sorts of other reasons.....never by a soldering iron. Most recently a chinese PC PSU zapped me, o well. I wan't soldering btw.

When working on battery backed SRAM etc, u don't want to accidentally ground the battery and kill the memory.

THE LED has nothing to do with the 10K to ground, ergo, I don't need a timer and I know if the Hakko is on and won't accidentally burn myself. A timer won't tell u that....it's on the 120VAC socket somewhere else....



--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell@...> wrote:

mosaicmerc wrote:

Well...I couldn't resist.....

So now there's a 10K resistor in line with the tip ground....in case I
forget something on while desoldering.

AND now...there's a hidden flashing LED illuminating the replaceable
tube canister from beneath!
No more forgetting the Hakko on.

If u want to add an LED...a 1k ohm inline with pins 7 (+ve) and pin 5
(-ve) on the 8 pin IC inside the Hakko delivers 9 mA to the LED.

Embedding the LED required slotting the plastic a little with a dremel
grinding wheel. The 5mm LED fits snug in a ready made channel in the
handle but u need slots to pass the wires and a slot for the LED to
shoot light up into the solder canister!.

The mod is invisible, took 15 mins. Appears factory made!
Soldering irons were replaced if they couldn't maintain under three
ohms to ground on our production line. Above three ohms, they were no
longer considered ESD safe. It was fun calibrating 150+ soldering irons
every 90 days. :(

Use a timer. Even better, add a switch to your workbench to shut
off all the outlets. I've also used a small contactor to shut down a
workbench in case of a power failure. This prevents power spikes caused
by multiple hits from a recloser as the utility tries to restore power.



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



vdonisa
 

I guess you don't want to *short* the battery contacts... Connecting just one contact to ground won't do anything... unless of course you have some active Tesla coil nearby that could find a new path to ground....

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "mosaicmerc" <mosaicmerc@...> wrote:

When working on battery backed SRAM etc, u don't want to accidentally ground the battery and kill the memory.


John Miles
 

Some good modifications there.  With a 10K resistor to ground, you can solder to low-voltage circuits, and you will still be protected by the GFI outlet that your iron is already plugged into if you are that safety-conscious.

 

The LED is an especially good idea, one that should have been included by Hakko.  It's not as if they couldn't afford it considering what these things cost.  I have already caught myself leaving my 808 on overnight because I forgot to unplug it.  The pilot light on my Metcal stations has evidently spoiled me, because leaving irons plugged in was never a problem back when none of them had lights.

 

As far as the production-line irons are concerned, three ohms to ground is probably for safety rather than ESD protection.  Like Stefan says, they may be concerned with possible line-to-ground shorts.  You can bet the operators' ESD wrist straps aren't grounded through three ohms. :)

 

-- john, KE5FX

 

 

From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...] On Behalf Of Michael A. Terrell
Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 4:16 AM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Hacking the Hakko 808

 

 

mosaicmerc wrote:
>
> Well...I couldn't resist.....
>
> So now there's a 10K resistor in line with the tip ground....in case I
> forget something on while desoldering.
>


Michael A. Terrell
 

vdonisa wrote:

I guess you don't want to *short* the battery contacts... Connecting just one contact to ground won't do anything... unless of course you have some active Tesla coil nearby that could find a new path to ground....

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com <mailto:TekScopes%40yahoogroups.com>, "mosaicmerc" <mosaicmerc@...> wrote:

When working on battery backed SRAM etc, u don't want to
accidentally ground the battery and kill the memory.
You unplug the item you're repairing so it isn't grounded. If you don't have a proper antistatic mat on your bench, connect a 1M resistor from the chassis to ground.


Michael A. Terrell
 

mosaicmerc wrote:

All my soldering irons are ungrounded.....been soldering some 30 years now. Never blew a chip.
You damaged any that were ESD sensitive.

Not all chips die right away. Anything that is ESD sensitive will be degraded. We didn't allow any ungrounded irons on the production floor. Manufacturing engineering had a couple 250W irons from their pre CMOS/FET days that could be used to solder scrap , blank PC boards for fixture housings but only while they observed.

My work was for Aerospace applications. We followed industry standards, but set our limits at least 30% tighter than the standards so a minor deviation still met the standards.

Keep using ungrounded irons and careless techniques. Some day you will destroy an irreplaceable part for a piece of equipment you can't afford to be without..


Michael A. Terrell
 

John Miles wrote:

Some good modifications there. With a 10K resistor to ground, you can solder to low-voltage circuits, and you will still be protected by the GFI outlet that your iron is already plugged into if you are that safety-conscious.

The LED is an especially good idea, one that should have been included by Hakko. It's not as if they couldn't afford it considering what these things cost. I have already caught myself leaving my 808 on overnight because I forgot to unplug it. The pilot light on my Metcal stations has evidently spoiled me, because leaving irons plugged in was never a problem back when none of them had lights.

As far as the production-line irons are concerned, three ohms to ground is probably for safety rather than ESD protection. Like Stefan says, they may be concerned with possible line-to-ground shorts. You can bet the operators' ESD wrist straps aren't grounded through three ohms. :)
Do whatever you want. I did work for NASA, NOAA, ESA and other government agencies.All mission critical hardware. Some had been in use for over 30 years without being turned off, and was tracking a long range probe NASA had launched years before.

I follow the industry standards that I learned to minimize ESD damage. The wrist strap has a 1 M resistor to ground, just like the ground for the antistatic mat on the benches. They prevent the buildup of static. The low impedance ground is to minimize the voltage induced into the tip. It is a complete system to ensure that the items aren't going to have a short useful life from punchthrough of the insulation in the FET/CMOS junctions.


stefan_trethan
 

Do what you like, but it has to be mentioned that the iron will not meet safety standards in this configuration.
The manufacturer wouldn't be allowed to sell it that way even with a GFI permanently attached to the cord.

There are ways to reduce the risk such as monitoring the voltage on the iron ground and shutting it down if it gets too high.
Kind of like the Tek A6901 Ground isolation monitor.
Thinking about it you could actually use the A6901 as-is to power an iron.
I might just do that since I have one sitting around gathering dust.

The cheapo version would be to use some kind of buzzer or alarm instead of the 10k resistor. That would tell you if the heater failed, but also if you accidentally forgot to power off the DUT.


ST


On Wed, May 29, 2013 at 8:19 PM, John Miles <john@...> wrote:


Some good modifications there.  With a 10K resistor to ground, you can solder to low-voltage circuits, and you will still be protected by the GFI outlet that your iron is already plugged into if you are that safety-conscious.

 



John Miles
 


Do whatever you want.

(Shrug) I do whatever Messrs. Ohm and Kirchoff say I can do.  The rest of the rules were written by lawyers, not engineers.

-- john, KE5FX


Michael A. Terrell
 

Stefan Trethan wrote:

Do what you like, but it has to be mentioned that the iron will not meet safety standards in this configuration.
The manufacturer wouldn't be allowed to sell it that way even with a GFI permanently attached to the cord.

There are ways to reduce the risk such as monitoring the voltage on the iron ground and shutting it down if it gets too high.
Kind of like the Tek A6901 Ground isolation monitor.
Thinking about it you could actually use the A6901 as-is to power an iron.
I might just do that since I have one sitting around gathering dust.

The cheapo version would be to use some kind of buzzer or alarm instead of the 10k resistor. That would tell you if the heater failed, but also if you accidentally forgot to power off the DUT.
I'm building a DC powered controller for the HAKKO irons. It will run one to four irons and a desoldering iron under microprocessor control, with a LCD display of temperature. Any iron that isn't picked up out of the stand for 15 minutes will shut down. The temperature of each iron will be programmable, and each iron will have a different type of tip. I'm also building a battery powered single iron version with a lead acid battery. It will be in an ammo can, so it can be tossed in the truck after use, without worrying about proper cool down.


Michael A. Terrell
 

John Miles wrote:


Do whatever you want.

(Shrug) I do whatever Messrs. Ohm and Kirchoff say I can do. The rest of the rules were written by lawyers, not engineers.

So, lawyers design ICs, and all electronics? Who knew.?


mosaicmerc
 

On the bit about the Hakko low ohmic ground, I understand it's for meeting certain safety regulations. However, being creative means bending the rules intelligently, otherwise we'd still all be lighting oil lamps cause electricity kills.. I value my 30 Years experience more than your NASA experience...Challenger, Columbia et al. I am still here.

I am far more likely to burn down my house by forgetting the Hakko on than being harmed by the HAkko shorting to ground and I get a 120VAC zap.....My neighbour's house burned cause someone forgot their clothes iron on too close to a curtain.

BTW my interest isn't in repairing appliances. I like modding things, changing things, challenging the status quo. Sure it means getting burned sometimes, but that's part of it.

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell@...> wrote:

John Miles wrote:

Some good modifications there. With a 10K resistor to ground, you can
solder to low-voltage circuits, and you will still be protected by the
GFI outlet that your iron is already plugged into if you are that
safety-conscious.

The LED is an especially good idea, one that should have been included
by Hakko. It's not as if they couldn't afford it considering what
these things cost. I have already caught myself leaving my 808 on
overnight because I forgot to unplug it. The pilot light on my Metcal
stations has evidently spoiled me, because leaving irons plugged in
was never a problem back when none of them had lights.

As far as the production-line irons are concerned, three ohms to
ground is probably for safety rather than ESD protection. Like Stefan
says, they may be concerned with possible line-to-ground shorts. You
can bet the operators' ESD wrist straps aren't grounded through three
ohms. :)
Do whatever you want. I did work for NASA, NOAA, ESA and other
government agencies.All mission critical hardware. Some had been in use
for over 30 years without being turned off, and was tracking a long
range probe NASA had launched years before.

I follow the industry standards that I learned to minimize ESD
damage. The wrist strap has a 1 M resistor to ground, just like the
ground for the antistatic mat on the benches. They prevent the buildup
of static. The low impedance ground is to minimize the voltage induced
into the tip. It is a complete system to ensure that the items aren't
going to have a short useful life from punchthrough of the insulation in
the FET/CMOS junctions.


Michael A. Terrell
 

mosaicmerc wrote:


On the bit about the Hakko low ohmic ground, I understand it's for meeting certain safety regulations. However, being creative means bending the rules intelligently, otherwise we'd still all be lighting oil lamps cause electricity kills.. I value my 30 Years experience more than your NASA experience...Challenger, Columbia et al. I am still here.

I am far more likely to burn down my house by forgetting the Hakko on than being harmed by the HAkko shorting to ground and I get a 120VAC zap.....My neighbour's house burned cause someone forgot their clothes iron on too close to a curtain.

BTW my interest isn't in repairing appliances. I like modding things, changing things, challenging the status quo. Sure it means getting burned sometimes, but that's part of it.
What an ass! The loss of those crews isn't to be joked about. The first sign something was wrong in each mission was the announcement, 'We have a loss of telemetry'. There are multiple receivers, so the loss has to be at the bird. It was like a kick in the stomach when the last bird broke up over the US. You knew that three systems couldn't all go down at once, but you wished they had.


As far as your 30 years, I'm just days short of 52 years in electronics. I outgrew your 'screw the facts' stage when I was 10 years old.


There is a big difference between being creative, and just trashing everything you touch. The IPC standards for soldering are about quality. Not that you would care. I hand soldered 288 pin ICs with .015" center to center spacing under a stereo microscope. Your method would have trashed the $800 embedded controller boards.


mosaicmerc
 

Well now, my little mod has become a flame war....nobody's forcing u here Mike. Didn't mean to upset u.I am sure u are very good at what u do.

So.... moving on to another Hakko hack....(I suggest you read something else now Mike, as I am breaking more rules)

Do u guys think that casting HAKKO tips from aluminium solder with brass tubing cores of various diameters would give a decent result?

I have the basics to do it, but I figured some discussion would be interesting. I don't think the Hakko tips are copper but I am not sure. If not the Alum. solder might actually delver better performance in heat transfer , are eminently repairable , being solder and quite light.

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell@...> wrote:

mosaicmerc wrote:


On the bit about the Hakko low ohmic ground, I understand it's for
meeting certain safety regulations. However, being creative means
bending the rules intelligently, otherwise we'd still all be lighting
oil lamps cause electricity kills.. I value my 30 Years experience
more than your NASA experience...Challenger, Columbia et al. I am
still here.

I am far more likely to burn down my house by forgetting the Hakko on
than being harmed by the HAkko shorting to ground and I get a 120VAC
zap.....My neighbour's house burned cause someone forgot their clothes
iron on too close to a curtain.

BTW my interest isn't in repairing appliances. I like modding things,
changing things, challenging the status quo. Sure it means getting
burned sometimes, but that's part of it.
What an ass! The loss of those crews isn't to be joked about. The
first sign something was wrong in each mission was the announcement, 'We
have a loss of telemetry'. There are multiple receivers, so the loss
has to be at the bird. It was like a kick in the stomach when the last
bird broke up over the US. You knew that three systems couldn't all go
down at once, but you wished they had.


As far as your 30 years, I'm just days short of 52 years in
electronics. I outgrew your 'screw the facts' stage when I was 10 years
old.


There is a big difference between being creative, and just trashing
everything you touch. The IPC standards for soldering are about
quality. Not that you would care. I hand soldered 288 pin ICs with
.015" center to center spacing under a stereo microscope. Your method
would have trashed the $800 embedded controller boards.


Daveolla
 

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "Michael A. Terrell" <mike.terrell@...> wrote:
I'm building a DC powered controller for the HAKKO irons. It will
run one to four irons and a desoldering iron under microprocessor
control, with a LCD display of temperature. Any iron that isn't picked
up out of the stand for 15 minutes will shut down. The temperature of
each iron will be programmable, and each iron will have a different type
of tip. I'm also building a battery powered single iron version with a
lead acid battery. It will be in an ammo can, so it can be tossed in
the truck after use, without worrying about proper cool down.
Greetings, there was quite a bit of talk on running the Hakko 936 iron heaters off of DC instead of AC over at;
http://dangerousprototypes.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=56&t=2457&sid=3c7e95a52215a4d513337ea051ba11ca

The link is a group effort to design a controller for the Hakko PTC sensor controlled irons and K type thermocouple controlled irons.

There are many pages to check thru but there is quite a bit of talk on DC shortening the life of the Hakko heater. I don't think they ever were conclusive as to why but it the dangers seem to exist.

Some on the site also had used laptop pwr supplies at about 18 volts to run the irons and may do in pinch for potability's sake when you don't want to haul the big controller around.

Good reading on the article anyway, lots of tips learned in all those pages.

There is also a DC Hakko 936 controller on the bay;
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/130620434360?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649

Item number; 130620434360 (they sure make it hard to find the item number these days, sup wit dat?)

Anyway my point again was to beware of DC.

Dave


vdonisa
 

LOL, you were one word close to saying "isolation transformer". Add a power bar with a brighlty lit power switch to remind you that the soldering iron is "on" an the hack is done. :-)

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@...> wrote:

Kind of like the Tek A6901 Ground isolation monitor.
Thinking about it you could actually use the A6901 as-is to power an iron.


vdonisa
 

I then suggest that you first read the National Electrical Code (or whatever it is called at your location) and check about that connection between safety ground and neutral that is to be done at the service entrance by any electrician aspiring to have his work approved during inspection. Once you have that figured out and realize that even after removing the safety ground pin from the iron's power plug, its internals are still referenced to "earth ground" and not "floating", you may reconsider bending the rules in this case and use instead the ancient "isolation transformer" thing.

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "mosaicmerc" <mosaicmerc@...> wrote:

However, being creative means bending the rules intelligently,