OT: the capacitor curse


vdonisa
 

While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what -  just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view 

I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable, however while  I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one, dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO


 

----- Original Message -----
From: vdonisa
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2013 1:13 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] OT: the capacitor curse

 

While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what -  just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view 

I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable, however while  I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one, dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO


 

Oh, btw. I hope you cleaned the board well. The electrolyte is boric acid or equal and will corrode the track over time.
Since you need to go back in for the other cap, you might remove the board and give it a good washing with dish soap and hot water. Then flush well with isopropyl alcohol 91% or more. Blow off and dry in the oven at about 130 °F or so for several hours.
 
Tom
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: vdonisa
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2013 1:13 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] OT: the capacitor curse

 

While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what -  just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view 

I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable, however while  I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one, dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO


vdonisa
 

I did a pretty thorough cleaning I believe (as now I'm idle with the scope work until the new lithium battery for the A5 board arrives), and I'll do it all over again when replacing the second cap. I was terrified by having to rework it again with that ROHS solder in place... whoever invented it (together with the guys that came up with BGA) should go to a special underworld place were they spend the eternity reworking SMT boards manually and getting 1000 lashes for each fail.

Thanks for the link, I'll order some!

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Miller" <tmiller11147@...> wrote:

Oh, btw. I hope you cleaned the board well. The electrolyte is boric acid or equal and will corrode the track over time.
Since you need to go back in for the other cap, you might remove the board and give it a good washing with dish soap and hot water. Then flush well with isopropyl alcohol 91% or more. Blow off and dry in the oven at about 130 °F or so for several hours.

Tom


----- Original Message -----
From: vdonisa
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2013 1:13 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] OT: the capacitor curse



While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what - just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view

I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable, however while I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one, dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO


Bob Albert
 

ChipQuik comes to mind.  Google it.

Bob


--- On Sun, 4/14/13, vdonisa wrote:

From: vdonisa
Subject: [TekScopes] OT: the capacitor curse
To: TekScopes@...
Date: Sunday, April 14, 2013, 10:13 AM

 

While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what -  just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view 

I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable, however while  I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one, dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO


Bert Haskins
 

On 04/14/2013 01:13 PM, vdonisa wrote:
 

While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what -  just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view 

I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable, however while  I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one, dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO

Sadly, this does not appear to be unusual, many late model flat screen tvs seem to eat filter caps for breakfast.
Same is true for many other consumer product items.
I think the market is targeted to the "use it toss it" crowd and a two-year product life time is the norm.
Some call this " going green".

I'm not even a service guy and I replaced at least forty caps in the last twelve months.
I do not replace caps just because of age.

One that I thought was interesting was on a friend of a friends very heavily used Fender amp.
The original caps had lasted for over a decade and were down to less than 30% of their rating.
The replacement caps were much smaller but as it turned out they only managed to last one year.

I have had very little trouble replacing parts though, at least those that are large enough to see.
One trick that I use is to first add solder to the connection and then remove it with the solder sucker.
I use NoClean 60/40 and sometimes use extra liquid flux.



 

This capacitor plague has been very useful to me. I got a Panasonic 42 inch flat screen TV for free because it had a bad cap. The consumer service industry only swaps bad "expensive" boards to effect repair. This seems to make repair for the average consumer not as desirable as just replacing the product. All the better for us.
 
However, I just repaired a HP3455A DMM that really seemed to have a bad mostek custom rom. It turned out to be a bad 74ls00 quad NAND that was used in deriving the chip select for the rom. Two good inputs but the output was stuck low.
 
The Tektronix 11800 series scopes can be sometimes had for a very low price due to a memory battery backed ram package that has small potted Li cells. When it goes dead, the scope reports many different errors on self test. for less than $30 for two new memories, you can have a very nice scope.
 
I guess you are right. It is just the $green$.
 
 
Regards,
Tom
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2013 2:24 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] OT: the capacitor curse

 

On 04/14/2013 01:13 PM, vdonisa wrote:
 

While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what -  just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view 

I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable, however while  I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one, dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO

Sadly, this does not appear to be unusual, many late model flat screen tvs seem to eat filter caps for breakfast.
Same is true for many other consumer product items.
I think the market is targeted to the "use it toss it" crowd and a two-year product life time is the norm.
Some call this " going green".

I'm not even a service guy and I replaced at least forty caps in the last twelve months.
I do not replace caps just because of age.

One that I thought was interesting was on a friend of a friends very heavily used Fender amp.
The original caps had lasted for over a decade and were down to less than 30% of their rating.
The replacement caps were much smaller but as it turned out they only managed to last one year.

I have had very little trouble replacing parts though, at least those that are large enough to see.
One trick that I use is to first add solder to the connection and then remove it with the solder sucker.
I use NoClean 60/40 and sometimes use extra liquid flux.



Glenn Little
 

Try heating the solder joint and adding good solder to the joint prior to using a vacuum desoldering tool to remove the solder.
If the first attempt does not remove all of the solder, resolder the joint with good solder and try again.
Do not use excessive heat or force while desoldering the connection.
The use of liquid rosin flux may help in getting all of the solder to flow and be vacuumed out of the hole.

This is the technique that I used at a TV station that I worked for until my boss, who was probably intimidated by my skills, demanded that I remove all of my "toys" from the station.
So there went my ability to use a vacuum desolder device at the station as it was my property.

73
Glenn
WB4UIV



At 01:13 PM 4/14/2013, you wrote:


While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what -  just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view  

I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable, however while  I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one, dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO



Peter Gottlieb <hpnpilot@...>
 

I've used ChipQuik (they will send you a small sample) but it's expensive stuff and I've found you don't really need it. I work on RoHS boards all the time, I just turn up my soldering iron a bit (I use 700F) and initially "resolder" the joints with regular cheap 60/40. Then I either use the Pace or fresh solder-wick braid (iron back down to 650 or 600). If I can get to it, I chop up the component with dykes, place the board in a PCB vise vertical and heat the joint while using a small needle nose to pull out the leads one at a time. If you can get a clear shot like that, a solder sucker on one side and the iron on the other works great.

On 4/14/2013 1:13 PM, vdonisa wrote:

While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what - just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view

I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable, however while I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one, dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Robert Simpson
 

Yup, My 24 inch LCD PC monitor and my wife's 22 inch (she uses it a lot less often), my wife's PC, my daughter's pc etc., and many more all came free to me (mid to upper pentium 4s, some dual core). Five to ten dollars or so in caps and then good for years more use. Several businesses throw them away as not cost effect to pay for repairs. As a retired person's hobby well worth it.
Bob

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, Bert Haskins <bhaskins@...> wrote:

On 04/14/2013 01:13 PM, vdonisa wrote:

While I was busy with refreshing the 2467B, my better half kept
complaining that the cable box is rebooting itself every 20 minutes or
so. Since I own it (not leased) I figured out I should do something
about it myself as its past warranty period.

Guess what - just to confirm that I was doing some useful work with
re-capping the scope, I found this inside the cable box (Scientific
Atlanta):

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TekScopes/photos/album/1306124308/pic/2092672805/view


I replaced the vented 470uF/10V and now the box seems to be stable,
however while I was resizing the photo to upload to the group I
noticed that the brown cap behind the Rubycon seems to be bulging so
I'll have to open the box again....

Which brings me to one question. This box is "ROHS", which makes it a
pain to (un)solder anything there. The freaking alloy they used needs
to be heated in excess of 400C in order to flow, and it doesn't seem
to properly adhere to anything except the inside of the metalized
holes :-(

I remember seeing once some advertising for a "magic solder" that you
would use on such joints and would combine with the existing ROHS one,
dramatically lowering the melting point and wetting properties of the
resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know
where I could find it again?

Thanks,
Valentin VE3VDO
Sadly, this does not appear to be unusual, many late model flat screen
tvs seem to eat filter caps for breakfast.
Same is true for many other consumer product items.
I think the market is targeted to the "use it toss it" crowd and a
two-year product life time is the norm.
Some call this " going green".

I'm not even a service guy and I replaced at least forty caps in the
last twelve months.
I do not replace caps just because of age.

One that I thought was interesting was on a friend of a friends very
heavily used Fender amp.
The original caps had lasted for over a decade and were down to less
than 30% of their rating.
The replacement caps were much smaller but as it turned out they only
managed to last one year.

I have had very little trouble replacing parts though, at least those
that are large enough to see.
One trick that I use is to first add solder to the connection and then
remove it with the solder sucker.
I use NoClean 60/40 and sometimes use extra liquid flux.


Alexandre Souza - Listas <pu1bzz.listas@...>
 

>resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?
    Look for "wood's metal". It is easily found in Brazil
 
    73 de PU1BZZ Alexandre Souza


guto25
 

Field's metal, becomes liquid at approximately 62 °C (144 °F). As it contains neither lead nor cadmium, it is a non-toxic alternative.
Regards, Carlos.

Em 15/04/2013 10:51, Alexandre Souza - Listas < pu1bzz.listas@... > escreveu:
 
>resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?
    Look for "wood's metal". It is easily found in Brazil
 
    73 de PU1BZZ Alexandre Souza
 
 


Don Black <donald_black@...>
 

We're really getting modern high tech now. Woods metal was used in the twenties to hold galena into the holder for cat's whisker detectors in crystal sets.
I've got some of that Quickchip but haven't used it yet, has anyone here actually used it and how well does it work? From their promotional videos it seems they use it for soldering SMD components in place.

Don Black.

On 16-Apr-13 12:28 AM, guto25 wrote:
 
Field's metal, becomes liquid at approximately 62 °C (144 °F). As it contains neither lead nor cadmium, it is a non-toxic alternative.
Regards, Carlos.

Em 15/04/2013 10:51, Alexandre Souza - Listas < pu1bzz.listas@... > escreveu:
 
>resulting alloy. However I cannot find it now, does anyone here know where I could find it again?
    Look for "wood's metal". It is easily found in Brazil
 
    73 de PU1BZZ Alexandre Souza
 
 


Dave C <davec2468@...>
 

As Carlos said, Field's Metal is the prefered one: it has no lead.

Don't confuse ChipQuik (don't know QuickChip) with real solder. CQ is not a substitute for solder, it's a desoldering aid. Solder paste is usually used for reflow soldering of SMDs.

Dave

Sent from my iPod

We're really getting modern high tech now. Woods metal was used in the twenties to hold galena into the holder for cat's whisker detectors in crystal sets.

I've got some of that Quickchip but haven't used it yet, has anyone here actually used it and how well does it work? From their promotional videos it seems they use it for soldering SMD components in place.

Don Black.


Field's metal, becomes liquid at approximately 62 °C (144 °F). As it contains neither lead nor cadmium, it is a non-toxic alternative.
Regards, Carlos.


magnustoelle
 

Hello,

I can confirm that ChipQuick works nicely for SMD components. We are using it to rework 10-pin to 28-pin-SMD-components on multilayer PCBs, and it is a great aid for manual, easy repair work. Their flux is also good, as it is very sticky.

I cannot comment on how useful ChipQuick is for through-hole/leaded components. I am using an ESD-safe solder pull (SOLDAPULLT SS350), solder wick and the old trick of wiggling component leads for those. This method works after you gained some experience...

Cheers,

Magnus


stefan_trethan
 

Do you have any more information on this?
What are the potential problems of leaving CQ in place as a solder?

ST


On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 5:30 PM, Dave C <davec2468@...> wrote:
As Carlos said, Field's Metal is the prefered one: it has no lead.

Don't confuse ChipQuik (don't know QuickChip) with real solder. CQ is not a substitute for solder, it's a desoldering aid. Solder paste is usually used for reflow soldering of SMDs.

Dave


vdonisa
 

Bismuth if it contains any. If so I personally would use it just to help remove the ROHS solder then clean out the resulting concoction and do the final soldering with standard 63/37.

--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@...> wrote:

Do you have any more information on this?
What are the potential problems of leaving CQ in place as a solder?

ST

On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 5:30 PM, Dave C <davec2468@...> wrote:

As Carlos said, Field's Metal is the prefered one: it has no lead.

Don't confuse ChipQuik (don't know QuickChip) with real solder. CQ is not
a substitute for solder, it's a desoldering aid. Solder paste is usually
used for reflow soldering of SMDs.

Dave


DaveC <davec2468@...>
 

Magnus
I presume you mean that you use CQ to remove SMDs and you use solder when placing new components?

Dave

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 15, 2013, at 9:57 AM, "magnustoelle" <magnustoelle@yahoo.com> wrote:

I can confirm that ChipQuick works nicely for SMD components. We are using it to rework 10-pin to 28-pin-SMD-components on multilayer PCBs, and it is a great aid for manual, easy repair work. Their flux is also good, as it is very sticky.


vdonisa
 

BTW I guess this would be the ultimate way to get rid of that pesky ROHS stuff, at room temperature - no iron needed:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FaMWxLCGY0U

Of course you also wouldn't have much pads left to solder the new component to :-) :-) :-)


--- In TekScopes@..., "vdonisa" wrote:
>
> Bismuth if it contains any. If so I personally would use it just to help remove the ROHS solder then clean out the resulting concoction and do the final soldering with standard 63/37.
>
> --- In TekScopes@..., Stefan Trethan stefan_trethan@ wrote:
> >
> > Do you have any more information on this?
> > What are the potential problems of leaving CQ in place as a solder?
> >
> > ST
> >
> > On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 5:30 PM, Dave C davec2468@ wrote:
> >
> > > As Carlos said, Field's Metal is the prefered one: it has no lead.
> > >
> > > Don't confuse ChipQuik (don't know QuickChip) with real solder. CQ is not
> > > a substitute for solder, it's a desoldering aid. Solder paste is usually
> > > used for reflow soldering of SMDs.
> > >
> > > Dave
> > >
> >
>


stefan_trethan
 

OK, and why is Bismuth bad?

I'm not just asking to waste your time, a colleague recently proposed using it as permanent solder.
Intuitively I felt it wasn't a good idea, but don't really know why.

This isn't totally off topic by the way - low melting point solder was used in a Tek product - the P6401 has a thermal fuse held down by some low melt alloy.

ST


On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 8:17 PM, vdonisa <vdonisa@...> wrote:
Bismuth if it contains any. If so I personally would use it just to help remove the ROHS solder then clean out the resulting concoction and do the final soldering with standard 63/37.

--- In TekScopes@..., Stefan Trethan wrote:
>
> Do you have any more information on this?
> What are the potential problems of leaving CQ in place as a solder?
>
> ST
>
> On Mon, Apr 15, 2013 at 5:30 PM, Dave C wrote:
>
> > As Carlos said, Field's Metal is the prefered one: it has no lead.
> >
> > Don't confuse ChipQuik (don't know QuickChip) with real solder. CQ is not
> > a substitute for solder, it's a desoldering aid. Solder paste is usually
> > used for reflow soldering of SMDs.
> >
> > Dave
> >
>




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