Topics

Opamp arithmetic circuits

Gala Dragos
 

Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?
 


Peter Gottlieb <hpnpilot@...>
 

I don't recall but I can say that you can build just about anything with op-amps. Whether it is appropriate to do that is another question...

But if you do, a Tek scope will be your best friend.

Peter



Jan 25, 2011 08:44:39 AM, TekScopes@... wrote:


Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?

Mike <mikez11@...>
 

Op-amp is short for "operational amplifier" which was originally developed to implement mathematical "operations" in analog computers. This application has disappeared, of course, but the name stuck.

--- In TekScopes@..., Gala Dragos <gala_dragos@...> wrote:

Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?

Gala Dragos
 

Yes I know the history and what can be done with an opamp, but I remembered that someone from the groups I've subscribed stated that his doing some arithmetic circuits with opamps. I needed some books on the subject as I'm taking a course that supposedly handles just that, the reality being quite different though.

Thanks for the answers, I'll ask around.
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

. Microsoft broke the Volkswagen world record: Volkswagen only made 22 million bugs!


. It is time for us to stand and cheer for the doer, the achiever, the one who recognizes the challenge and does something about it.
-Vince Lombardi


. Everybody can learn how to make kids, but not everyone can raise them right!

From: Mike
To: TekScopes@...
Cc:
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 6:12 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits

 
Op-amp is short for "operational amplifier" which was originally developed to implement mathematical "operations" in analog computers. This application has disappeared, of course, but the name stuck.

--- In TekScopes@..., Gala Dragos wrote:
>
> Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?
>




Albert LaFrance
 

Fluidics is the future! J

 

 

From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...] On Behalf Of Peter Gottlieb
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 10:36 AM
To: TekScopes@...
Cc: TekScopes@...
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Opamp arithmetic circuits

 

 

I don't recall but I can say that you can build just about anything with op-amps. Whether it is appropriate to do that is another question...

But if you do, a Tek scope will be your best friend.

Peter

Jan 25, 2011 08:44:39 AM, TekScopes@... wrote:

Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?

Gala Dragos
 

The future is bright! The future is... I can't see because of this stupid light !
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

. Microsoft broke the Volkswagen world record: Volkswagen only made 22 million bugs!


. It is time for us to stand and cheer for the doer, the achiever, the one who recognizes the challenge and does something about it.
-Vince Lombardi


. Everybody can learn how to make kids, but not everyone can raise them right!

From: Albert LaFrance
To: TekScopes@...
Cc:
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 6:47 PM
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Opamp arithmetic circuits

 
Fluidics is the future! J
 
 
From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...] On Behalf Of Peter Gottlieb
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 10:36 AM
To: TekScopes@...
Cc: TekScopes@...
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Opamp arithmetic circuits
 
 
I don't recall but I can say that you can build just about anything with op-amps. Whether it is appropriate to do that is another question...

But if you do, a Tek scope will be your best friend.

Peter

Jan 25, 2011 08:44:39 AM, TekScopes@... wrote:

Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?




John Rehwinkel <jrehwin@...>
 

On 1/25/2011 11:45 AM, Gala Dragos wrote:
 
Yes I know the history and what can be done with an opamp, but I remembered that someone from the groups I've subscribed stated that his doing some arithmetic circuits with opamps. I needed some books on the subject as I'm taking a course that supposedly handles just that, the reality being quite different though.
Have a look at the manual for the type O plug-in (this is TekScopes, after all).  It's an operational amplifier plug-in, and the manual has a lot of good data and examples on how to use op-amps to do various things.  There's the danger that you might want to go out and get a type O plug-in to play with, but that's the sort of danger most of us live with every day.

- John

Leon Robinson
 

Look at this.

www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/archives/philbrick/computing_amplifiers.html

Leon     K5JLR

Political Correctness is a Political Disease.


--- On Tue, 1/25/11, Gala Dragos wrote:

From: Gala Dragos
Subject: [TekScopes] Opamp arithmetic circuits
To: "TekScopes@..."
Date: Tuesday, January 25, 2011, 7:44 AM

 

Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?
 


Ken Wright <lutonman42@...>
 

Hi.
I can remember in the early 70's using op-amps the build analogue computers and using them to analyse the response of mechanical springs and tuned circuits. It involved mathematical modelling the device in the S plane then building integrators and differentiators using op-amps, also a vast amount of scaling pots.

Regards.
Ken



From: Gala Dragos
To: "TekScopes@..."
Sent: Tue, 25 January, 2011 16:45:40
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits

 

Yes I know the history and what can be done with an opamp, but I remembered that someone from the groups I've subscribed stated that his doing some arithmetic circuits with opamps. I needed some books on the subject as I'm taking a course that supposedly handles just that, the reality being quite different though.

Thanks for the answers, I'll ask around.
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

. Microsoft broke the Volkswagen world record: Volkswagen only made 22 million bugs!


. It is time for us to stand and cheer for the doer, the achiever, the one who recognizes the challenge and does something about it.
-Vince Lombardi


. Everybody can learn how to make kids, but not everyone can raise them right!

From: Mike
To: TekScopes@...
Cc:
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 6:12 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits

 
Op-amp is short for "operational amplifier" which was originally developed to implement mathematical "operations" in analog computers. This application has disappeared, of course, but the name stuck.

--- In TekScopes@..., Gala Dragos wrote:
>
> Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?
>





Richard L. Wurdack
 


Yep, we used to do whole airplane simulations that way.
 
D.

----- Original Message -----
From: Ken Wright
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 12:37 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits

 

Hi.
I can remember in the early 70's using op-amps the build analogue computers and using them to analyse the response of mechanical springs and tuned circuits. It involved mathematical modelling the device in the S plane then building integrators and differentiators using op-amps, also a vast amount of scaling pots.

Regards.
Ken



From: Gala Dragos
To: "TekScopes@..."
Sent: Tue, 25 January, 2011 16:45:40
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits

 

Yes I know the history and what can be done with an opamp, but I remembered that someone from the groups I've subscribed stated that his doing some arithmetic circuits with opamps. I needed some books on the subject as I'm taking a course that supposedly handles just that, the reality being quite different though.

Thanks for the answers, I'll ask around.
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

. Microsoft broke the Volkswagen world record: Volkswagen only made 22 million bugs!


. It is time for us to stand and cheer for the doer, the achiever, the one who recognizes the challenge and does something about it.
-Vince Lombardi


. Everybody can learn how to make kids, but not everyone can raise them right!

From: Mike <mikez11@...>
To: TekScopes@...
Cc:
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 6:12 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits

 
Op-amp is short for "operational amplifier" which was originally developed to implement mathematical "operations" in analog computers. This application has disappeared, of course, but the name stuck.

--- In TekScopes@..., Gala Dragos wrote:
>
> Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?
>





Paul Amaranth
 

A while back I ran across a story/link on one of the the first computer games built
with an analog computer. The game, Tennis for Two, used a scope as a vidoe output
device and was done at Brookhaven. I believe one of the labs, maybe Brookhaven, has
managed to scrounge more or less original parts to recreate the device in somewhat
its original form.

Here's a wikipedia link to that:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennis_for_Two

On Tue, Jan 25, 2011 at 08:37:08PM +0000, Ken Wright wrote:
Hi.
I can remember in the early 70's using op-amps the build analogue computers and
using them to analyse the response of mechanical springs and tuned circuits. It
involved mathematical modelling the device in the S plane then building
integrators and differentiators using op-amps, also a vast amount of scaling
pots.

Regards.
Ken
--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Rochester MI, USA
Aurora Group, Inc. | Security, Systems & Software
paul@... | Unix & Windows

Dan Fish <defish1@...>
 

Nice that AD scanned that classic for the public.  I actually have one of the originals (from my Wavetek days).  I wonder if ArtekMedia could do a more legible job with this?

Dan


On 1/25/2011 12:30 PM, Leon Robinson wrote:
 

Look at this.

www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/archives/philbrick/computing_amplifiers.html

Leon     K5JLR

Political Correctness is a Political Disease.

--- On Tue, 1/25/11, Gala Dragos wrote:

From: Gala Dragos
Subject: [TekScopes] Opamp arithmetic circuits
To: "TekScopes@..."
Date: Tuesday, January 25, 2011, 7:44 AM

 
Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?
 



Albert <aodiversen@...>
 

Considering the climate changes we might have to rivive this one:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deltar
(the Dutch wikipedia version gives more details).
Albert

Albert LaFrance
 

Nice machine – analog computing really seems to be a more “natural” way of solving that type of problem.  But the picture needs a few beautiful Dutch girls in miniskirts and go-go boots (with white lab coats and glasses, of course!)

 

For those on a budget, here’s a desktop model.  Well, at least it’s the size of a desk:

http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1955-12-12/009.html

I understand these power-network computers were used even into the 1960s.

 

And here’s one used to solve “economic dispatch” problems for electric utilities:

http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1957-04-08/087.html

The picture on p. 90 shows the dials used to enter the parameters for a particular generating unit, and the plug-in modules storing constants.

Finally, a nuclear reactor simulator, complete with moving control rods and simulated Cerenkov glow!

http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1955-09-05/158.html

 

 

 

 

From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...] On Behalf Of Albert
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 4:53 PM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits

 

 

Considering the climate changes we might have to rivive this one:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deltar
(the Dutch wikipedia version gives more details).
Albert

Artekmedia <manuals@...>
 

Dan

We probably could but would need some clarification on what if any copyrights restrictions are in place regardless of this copy already "floating " around.

Then I would need some motivation to scan it .. :-) .  Many people are content to pay for oats that have already been through the horse ( i.e.nothing  for free horse manure) rather than spend $10 for a good scan . I am always reluctant to scan something that is already available for free even if it is a poor scan . In the end I need to recover the value of my time.

Dave
Artekmedia


On 1/25/2011 3:07 PM, Dan Fish wrote:
 

Nice that AD scanned that classic for the public.  I actually have one of the originals (from my Wavetek days).  I wonder if ArtekMedia could do a more legible job with this?

Dan


On 1/25/2011 12:30 PM, Leon Robinson wrote:

 

Look at this.

www.analog.com/library/analogdialogue/archives/philbrick/computing_amplifiers.html

Leon     K5JLR

Political Correctness is a Political Disease.

--- On Tue, 1/25/11, Gala Dragos wrote:

From: Gala Dragos
Subject: [TekScopes] Opamp arithmetic circuits
To: "TekScopes@..."
Date: Tuesday, January 25, 2011, 7:44 AM

 
Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?
 




-- 
Dave & Lynn Henderson
Manuals@...
www.Artekmedia.com
PO Box 175
Welch,MN 55089

gridleakrick <gridleakrick@...>
 

Try this web site
http://www.philbrickarchive.org/
George Philbrick is considered by many to be the father of the op amp.
Rick
======================================================================

--- In TekScopes@..., Gala Dragos <gala_dragos@...> wrote:

Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?

Mike McGinn <mike.mcginn@...>
 

On Wednesday, January 26, 2011 00:56:41 you wrote:
Try this web site
http://www.philbrickarchive.org/
George Philbrick is considered by many to be the father of the op amp.
Rick
From the picture on the site, it looks like Bob Pease was the father of the
messy desk.


======================================================================

--- In TekScopes@..., Gala Dragos <gala_dragos@...> wrote:
Is this the group where I've heard someone talking about building
circuits with opamp to emulate arithmetic logic ?
--
Mike McGinn FACOCM
You won't look forward to the trip!
No electrons were harmed in sending this message.
** Registered Linux User 377849

Ed Breya
 

While scooping up dog turds this morning, I thought of these posts, and that analog computing comes in many forms - it certainly is not extinct. The massively-parallel analog plus whatever computer in my head allowed me in about fifteen minutes to scan several thousand square feet of lawn, spot and distinguish dog turds from fallen leaves and debris, calculate optimal attack angles, deftly operate the scooper over a hundred times and coordinate it with the bucket, determine real-time optimal wandering paths, and process auxiliary information such as the sense of stepping on a missed "target item," all while contemplating how many opamp circuits or the digital processing power it would take just to control this routine activity. It is mind boggling.

Ed

--- In TekScopes@..., "Albert LaFrance" <albert.lafrance@...> wrote:

Nice machine - analog computing really seems to be a more "natural" way of
solving that type of problem. But the picture needs a few beautiful Dutch
girls in miniskirts and go-go boots (with white lab coats and glasses, of
course!)

For those on a budget, here's a desktop model. Well, at least it's the size
of a desk:

http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1955-12-12/009.html

I understand these power-network computers were used even into the 1960s.

And here's one used to solve "economic dispatch" problems for electric
utilities:

http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1957-04-08/087.html

The picture on p. 90 shows the dials used to enter the parameters for a
particular generating unit, and the plug-in modules storing constants.

Finally, a nuclear reactor simulator, complete with moving control rods and
simulated Cerenkov glow!

http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1955-09-05/158.html

From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...] On Behalf
Of Albert
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 4:53 PM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits

Considering the climate changes we might have to rivive this one:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deltar
(the Dutch wikipedia version gives more details).
Albert

Artekmedia <manuals@...>
 

Puzzle me this Batman ...were Ed's comments just now a satirical editorial on this whole thread ...or Ed demonstrating (bragging?) that not only is he a walking-talking- analog computer but  an analog computer capable of multi-tasking and parallel processing. ...Now if Ed had only been chewing gum the whole time ..well wouldn't that have been something

Dave


On 1/26/2011 11:00 AM, Ed Breya wrote:
 

While scooping up dog turds this morning, I thought of these posts, and that analog computing comes in many forms - it certainly is not extinct. The massively-parallel analog plus whatever computer in my head allowed me in about fifteen minutes to scan several thousand square feet of lawn, spot and distinguish dog turds from fallen leaves and debris, calculate optimal attack angles, deftly operate the scooper over a hundred times and coordinate it with the bucket, determine real-time optimal wandering paths, and process auxiliary information such as the sense of stepping on a missed "target item," all while contemplating how many opamp circuits or the digital processing power it would take just to control this routine activity. It is mind boggling.

Ed

--- In TekScopes@..., "Albert LaFrance" wrote:
>
> Nice machine - analog computing really seems to be a more "natural" way of
> solving that type of problem. But the picture needs a few beautiful Dutch
> girls in miniskirts and go-go boots (with white lab coats and glasses, of
> course!)
>
> For those on a budget, here's a desktop model. Well, at least it's the size
> of a desk:
>
> http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1955-12-12/009.html
>
> I understand these power-network computers were used even into the 1960s.
>
> And here's one used to solve "economic dispatch" problems for electric
> utilities:
>
> http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1957-04-08/087.html
>
> The picture on p. 90 shows the dials used to enter the parameters for a
> particular generating unit, and the plug-in modules storing constants.
>
> Finally, a nuclear reactor simulator, complete with moving control rods and
> simulated Cerenkov glow!
>
> http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1955-09-05/158.html
>
> From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...] On Behalf
> Of Albert
> Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 4:53 PM
> To: TekScopes@...
> Subject: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits
>
> Considering the climate changes we might have to rivive this one:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deltar
> (the Dutch wikipedia version gives more details).
> Albert
>


-- 
Dave & Lynn Henderson
Manuals@...
www.Artekmedia.com
PO Box 175
Welch,MN 55089

Mike McGinn <mike.mcginn@...>
 

Ed,
So what you are really saying is you need somebody to make a robot that picks
up dog turds.

Mike

On Wednesday, January 26, 2011 12:00:12 you wrote:
While scooping up dog turds this morning, I thought of these posts, and
that analog computing comes in many forms - it certainly is not extinct.
The massively-parallel analog plus whatever computer in my head allowed me
in about fifteen minutes to scan several thousand square feet of lawn,
spot and distinguish dog turds from fallen leaves and debris, calculate
optimal attack angles, deftly operate the scooper over a hundred times and
coordinate it with the bucket, determine real-time optimal wandering
paths, and process auxiliary information such as the sense of stepping on
a missed "target item," all while contemplating how many opamp circuits or
the digital processing power it would take just to control this routine
activity. It is mind boggling.

Ed

--- In TekScopes@..., "Albert LaFrance" <albert.lafrance@...>
wrote:
Nice machine - analog computing really seems to be a more "natural" way
of solving that type of problem. But the picture needs a few beautiful
Dutch girls in miniskirts and go-go boots (with white lab coats and
glasses, of course!)

For those on a budget, here's a desktop model. Well, at least it's the
size of a desk:

http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1955-12-12/009.htm
l

I understand these power-network computers were used even into the 1960s.

And here's one used to solve "economic dispatch" problems for electric
utilities:

http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1957-04-08/087.htm
l

The picture on p. 90 shows the dials used to enter the parameters for a
particular generating unit, and the plug-in modules storing constants.

Finally, a nuclear reactor simulator, complete with moving control rods
and simulated Cerenkov glow!

http://long-lines.net/other/electrical/ElectricalWorld-1955-09-05/158.htm
l

From: TekScopes@... [mailto:TekScopes@...] On
Behalf Of Albert
Sent: Tuesday, January 25, 2011 4:53 PM
To: TekScopes@...
Subject: [TekScopes] Re: Opamp arithmetic circuits

Considering the climate changes we might have to rivive this one:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deltar
(the Dutch wikipedia version gives more details).
Albert
--
Mike McGinn FACOCM
You won't look forward to the trip!
No electrons were harmed in sending this message.
** Registered Linux User 377849