Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


Philip Stewart
 

Hi folks.
Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
batteries, e.g. as one would find in a Tektronix 200-series portable
o'scope? (i.e. alkaline or acid electrolyte leakage)I'm thinking that
if I get one of these 'scopes sometime, I'd be really sad if it got
leaky on me and ruined itself (I also don't look forward to changing
the batteries, but some things just have to be done).

Thanks for any ideas!

Best,
Phil Stewart


J. Forster <jfor@...>
 

The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year. IMO, any
battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly often.

In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with regular cal
cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds, the
early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed before
being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument is in
private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the value or
price of the instrument.)

In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear because the
'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for cost
accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any longer.
The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it was not
rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business, such a
procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on government
contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result. Hence $600
toilet seats and high taxes.

In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as guilty
as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part of the
reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just goes bad
sitting on a shelf.

FWIW,
-John

onamathist wrote:

Hi folks.
Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
batteries, [snip]


arthurok <arthurok@...>
 

maybe some sort of sensitive litmus paper that would detect vapors

----- Original Message -----
From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
To: "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year. IMO, any
battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly often.

In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with regular cal
cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds, the
early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed before
being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument is in
private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the value or
price of the instrument.)

In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear because the
'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for cost
accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any longer.
The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it was not
rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business, such a
procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on government
contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result. Hence $600
toilet seats and high taxes.

In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as guilty
as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part of the
reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just goes bad
sitting on a shelf.

FWIW,
-John

onamathist wrote:

Hi folks.
Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
batteries, [snip]



Yahoo! Groups Links






Chris van Lint
 

In principle any form of pH paper would change colour, providing it is not bone dry. The real problem is that by the time you notice that the paper colour has changed a considerably amount of damage has probably been done. There are continous electronic pH sensors available, but using them would be really gilding the lilly, as they are horendously expensive.

Chris

----- Original Message -----
From: arthurok
To: jfor@quik.com ; onamathist ; TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 1:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


maybe some sort of sensitive litmus paper that would detect
vapors
----- Original Message -----
From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
To: "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


> The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year.
> IMO, any
> battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly
> often.
>
> In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with regular
> cal
> cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds,
> the
> early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed
> before
> being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument
> is in
> private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the
> value or
> price of the instrument.)
>
> In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear because
> the
> 'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for
> cost
> accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any
> longer.
> The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it was
> not
> rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business,
> such a
> procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on
> government
> contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result. Hence
> $600
> toilet seats and high taxes.
>
> In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as
> guilty
> as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part of
> the
> reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just
> goes bad
> sitting on a shelf.
>
> FWIW,
> -John
>
> onamathist wrote:
>
>> Hi folks.
>> Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
>> batteries, [snip]
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
>



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Ashton Brown <ashton@...>
 

Heathkit GD-1701 Flood Alarm - an inexpensive small box with 2 ICs: a LM1801N and a CD40106BCN -- connected to a length of wire and a small PCB er, 'rectangular Archimedes spiral'.

Works fine for its intended purpose: monitoring basements. A damp finger across the traces triggers it - 9V battery. Assuredly any old electrolyte would do even better; presumably a Fet-input op-amp + the oscillator/driver circuit for a small speaker ... one could monitor a shelf of battery-op devices, with the sensors in parallel.

Wouldn't be hard to crank out a bunch of spirals, smallest gauge 'zip-cord' type wire - and one box to watch them all! (One ring to ...)
Alas, no scanner here, though a possibility at neighbor's.
(I wonder if there's a WWW-cache of old Heath� � � schematics?)
Be lost sans my IG-4244 late-design Scope Calibrator with ~700 pSec Tr, decently refined as to artifacts. HP grade, if not quite.. as pretty as Tek.

HTH,
Ashton



onamathist wrote:

Hi folks. Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
batteries, e.g. as one would find in a Tektronix 200-series portable
o'scope? (i.e. alkaline or acid electrolyte leakage)I'm thinking that
if I get one of these 'scopes sometime, I'd be really sad if it got
leaky on me and ruined itself (I also don't look forward to changing
the batteries, but some things just have to be done).

Thanks for any ideas!

Best,
Phil Stewart


Don Collie <donmer@...>
 

Could the battery be sealed up in a plastic bag, for example?.................Don Collie.

----- Original Message -----
From: "arthurok" <arthurok@ameritech.net>
To: <jfor@quik.com>; "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 2:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


maybe some sort of sensitive litmus paper that would detect
vapors
----- Original Message -----
From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
To: "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year.
IMO, any
battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly
often.

In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with regular
cal
cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds,
the
early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed
before
being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument
is in
private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the
value or
price of the instrument.)

In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear because
the
'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for
cost
accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any
longer.
The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it was
not
rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business,
such a
procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on
government
contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result. Hence
$600
toilet seats and high taxes.

In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as
guilty
as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part of
the
reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just
goes bad
sitting on a shelf.

FWIW,
-John

onamathist wrote:

Hi folks.
Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
batteries, [snip]



Yahoo! Groups Links








Yahoo! Groups Links








--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.1/292 - Release Date: 24-Mar-06


arthurok <arthurok@...>
 

no; it has to be able to vent so dont hermetically seal the battery case

----- Original Message -----
From: "Don Collie" <donmer@xtra.co.nz>
To: <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


Could the battery be sealed up in a plastic bag, for
example?.................Don Collie.


----- Original Message -----
From: "arthurok" <arthurok@ameritech.net>
To: <jfor@quik.com>; "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>;
<TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 2:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


maybe some sort of sensitive litmus paper that would detect
vapors
----- Original Message -----
From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
To: "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year.
IMO, any
battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly
often.

In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with
regular
cal
cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds,
the
early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed
before
being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument
is in
private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the
value or
price of the instrument.)

In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear because
the
'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for
cost
accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any
longer.
The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it
was
not
rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business,
such a
procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on
government
contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result. Hence
$600
toilet seats and high taxes.

In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as
guilty
as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part
of
the
reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just
goes bad
sitting on a shelf.

FWIW,
-John

onamathist wrote:

Hi folks.
Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
batteries, [snip]



Yahoo! Groups Links








Yahoo! Groups Links








--
No virus found in this incoming message.
Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.1/292 - Release Date: 24-Mar-06



Yahoo! Groups Links






Chris van Lint
 

Now that is a brillaint idea and I am not being sarcastic. If you have the space and you can fit athe component in a generously oversized, but hermeticallt sealed bag, it could work. Make sure as much of the air as possible inside the bag is evacuated prior to sealing the bag. A polyester bag (the ones used in microwave ovens) would be best, it will withstand the temeperatures and will not be affected by the electrolyte. If you wanted to be super sophisticated, drill a little observation hole in a spot where you can see the bag, to periodically check.

Chris

----- Original Message -----
From: Don Collie
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, March 25, 2006 9:22 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


Could the battery be sealed up in a plastic bag, for
example?.................Don Collie.


----- Original Message -----
From: "arthurok" <arthurok@ameritech.net>
To: <jfor@quik.com>; "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>;
<TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 2:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


> maybe some sort of sensitive litmus paper that would detect
> vapors
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
> To: "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
> Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:04 PM
> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
> (acid/alkaline)
>
>
>> The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year.
>> IMO, any
>> battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly
>> often.
>>
>> In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with
>> regular
>> cal
>> cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds,
>> the
>> early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed
>> before
>> being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument
>> is in
>> private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the
>> value or
>> price of the instrument.)
>>
>> In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear because
>> the
>> 'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for
>> cost
>> accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any
>> longer.
>> The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it
>> was
>> not
>> rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business,
>> such a
>> procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on
>> government
>> contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result. Hence
>> $600
>> toilet seats and high taxes.
>>
>> In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as
>> guilty
>> as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part
>> of
>> the
>> reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just
>> goes bad
>> sitting on a shelf.
>>
>> FWIW,
>> -John
>>
>> onamathist wrote:
>>
>>> Hi folks.
>>> Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
>>> batteries, [snip]
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Yahoo! Groups Links
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.1/292 - Release Date: 24-Mar-06
>



------------------------------------------------------------------------------
YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS

a.. Visit your group "TekScopes" on the web.

b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
TekScopes-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


------------------------------------------------------------------------------


stefan_trethan
 

maybe there is a way to absorb or neutralize the electrolyte?
Like silica gel is used for water...

Or simply convert it to mains power only and be done, how often do you need battery power anyway?
You could always make a connector to hook up a external battery if you really think you need your scope with you and working on that camping trip out in the woods ;-)

ST

On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 00:06:23 +0100, Chris van Lint <chrisvanlint@bigpond.com> wrote:

Now that is a brillaint idea and I am not being sarcastic. If you have the space and you can fit athe component in a generously
oversized, but hermeticallt sealed bag, it could work. Make sure as much of the air as possible inside the bag is evacuated prior to
sealing the bag. A polyester bag (the ones used in microwave ovens) would be best, it will withstand the temeperatures and will not be
affected by the electrolyte. If you wanted to be super sophisticated, drill a little observation hole in a spot where you can see the
bag, to periodically check.


Chris


Chris van Lint
 

I wonder whether we are concentrating too much on remediation, rather than prevention. Most of these things, when they break down, first get very, very hot, before they first of all expell the gas, which is then followed by the electrolyte. Why not epoxy a thermistor to the capacitor surface connected to a simple circuit with a piezzo buzzer, which raises holy hell when nature is about to demonstrate its awsome forces?

Chris

----- Original Message -----
From: arthurok
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com ; Don Collie
Sent: Saturday, March 25, 2006 10:03 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


no; it has to be able to vent so dont hermetically seal the
battery case
----- Original Message -----
From: "Don Collie" <donmer@xtra.co.nz>
To: <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


> Could the battery be sealed up in a plastic bag, for
> example?.................Don Collie.
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "arthurok" <arthurok@ameritech.net>
> To: <jfor@quik.com>; "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>;
> <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
> Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 2:08 PM
> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
> (acid/alkaline)
>
>
>> maybe some sort of sensitive litmus paper that would detect
>> vapors
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
>> To: "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
>> Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:04 PM
>> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
>> (acid/alkaline)
>>
>>
>>> The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year.
>>> IMO, any
>>> battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly
>>> often.
>>>
>>> In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with
>>> regular
>>> cal
>>> cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds,
>>> the
>>> early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed
>>> before
>>> being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument
>>> is in
>>> private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the
>>> value or
>>> price of the instrument.)
>>>
>>> In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear
>>> because
>>> the
>>> 'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for
>>> cost
>>> accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any
>>> longer.
>>> The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it
>>> was
>>> not
>>> rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business,
>>> such a
>>> procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on
>>> government
>>> contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result.
>>> Hence
>>> $600
>>> toilet seats and high taxes.
>>>
>>> In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as
>>> guilty
>>> as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part
>>> of
>>> the
>>> reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just
>>> goes bad
>>> sitting on a shelf.
>>>
>>> FWIW,
>>> -John
>>>
>>> onamathist wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hi folks.
>>>> Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
>>>> batteries, [snip]
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Yahoo! Groups Links
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> No virus found in this incoming message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.1/292 - Release Date: 24-Mar-06
>>
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
>



SPONSORED LINKS Science Classic Oscilloscope
Computer science Science education


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------------------------------------------------------------------------------


arthurok <arthurok@...>
 

older laptop batteries had snap action thermostats attached to their batterypacks to prevent overheating from overcharging

----- Original Message -----
From: Chris van Lint
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com ; Don Collie ; arthurok
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 5:20 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


I wonder whether we are concentrating too much on remediation, rather than prevention. Most of these things, when they break down, first get very, very hot, before they first of all expell the gas, which is then followed by the electrolyte. Why not epoxy a thermistor to the capacitor surface connected to a simple circuit with a piezzo buzzer, which raises holy hell when nature is about to demonstrate its awsome forces?

Chris


----- Original Message -----
From: arthurok
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com ; Don Collie
Sent: Saturday, March 25, 2006 10:03 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


no; it has to be able to vent so dont hermetically seal the
battery case
----- Original Message -----
From: "Don Collie" <donmer@xtra.co.nz>
To: <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


> Could the battery be sealed up in a plastic bag, for
> example?.................Don Collie.
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "arthurok" <arthurok@ameritech.net>
> To: <jfor@quik.com>; "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>;
> <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
> Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 2:08 PM
> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
> (acid/alkaline)
>
>
>> maybe some sort of sensitive litmus paper that would detect
>> vapors
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
>> To: "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
>> Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:04 PM
>> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
>> (acid/alkaline)
>>
>>
>>> The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year.
>>> IMO, any
>>> battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly
>>> often.
>>>
>>> In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with
>>> regular
>>> cal
>>> cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds,
>>> the
>>> early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed
>>> before
>>> being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument
>>> is in
>>> private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the
>>> value or
>>> price of the instrument.)
>>>
>>> In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear
>>> because
>>> the
>>> 'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for
>>> cost
>>> accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any
>>> longer.
>>> The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it
>>> was
>>> not
>>> rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business,
>>> such a
>>> procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on
>>> government
>>> contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result.
>>> Hence
>>> $600
>>> toilet seats and high taxes.
>>>
>>> In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as
>>> guilty
>>> as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part
>>> of
>>> the
>>> reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just
>>> goes bad
>>> sitting on a shelf.
>>>
>>> FWIW,
>>> -John
>>>
>>> onamathist wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hi folks.
>>>> Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
>>>> batteries, [snip]
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Yahoo! Groups Links
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> No virus found in this incoming message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.1/292 - Release Date: 24-Mar-06
>>
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
>



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Dave Worthy <Dworthy@...>
 

I also have a small Tektronix scope, a 224 and the battery is gone, also
has a bad low voltage supply - anybody have or know where I can get my
hands on a schematic? Thanks...
David W
Dworthy@rfcode.com

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of Stefan Trethan
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 4:14 PM
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)

maybe there is a way to absorb or neutralize the electrolyte?
Like silica gel is used for water...

Or simply convert it to mains power only and be done, how often do you
need battery power anyway?
You could always make a connector to hook up a external battery if you
really think you need your scope with you and working on that camping
trip
out in the woods ;-)

ST


On Sat, 25 Mar 2006 00:06:23 +0100, Chris van Lint
<chrisvanlint@bigpond.com> wrote:

Now that is a brillaint idea and I am not being sarcastic. If you
have
the space and you can fit athe component in a generously
oversized, but hermeticallt sealed bag, it could work. Make sure as
much of the air as possible inside the bag is evacuated prior to
sealing the bag. A polyester bag (the ones used in microwave ovens)
would be best, it will withstand the temeperatures and will not be
affected by the electrolyte. If you wanted to be super sophisticated,
drill a little observation hole in a spot where you can see the
bag, to periodically check.


Chris




Yahoo! Groups Links


Chris van Lint
 

Yep, my IBM Tinkpad 600 has a sensor fitted in the LithiumIon batterypack. By the way an interesting observation: The LI cells have a terminal voltage 0 3.6V The batterypack should output 10.6V So they use 6 cells. First 3 series blocks of 2cells in PARRALLEL. It must work I guess, although my battery only lasted about a year. I just read that again and I'm not sure it makes sense. There 3 lots of two cells in parralllel, which are then put in series oh well i give up.......

Chris----- Original Message -----
From: arthurok
To: Chris van Lint ; TekScopes@yahoogroups.com ; Don Collie
Sent: Saturday, March 25, 2006 10:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


older laptop batteries had snap action thermostats attached to their batterypacks to prevent overheating from overcharging
----- Original Message -----
From: Chris van Lint
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com ; Don Collie ; arthurok
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 5:20 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


I wonder whether we are concentrating too much on remediation, rather than prevention. Most of these things, when they break down, first get very, very hot, before they first of all expell the gas, which is then followed by the electrolyte. Why not epoxy a thermistor to the capacitor surface connected to a simple circuit with a piezzo buzzer, which raises holy hell when nature is about to demonstrate its awsome forces?

Chris


----- Original Message -----
From: arthurok
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com ; Don Collie
Sent: Saturday, March 25, 2006 10:03 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


no; it has to be able to vent so dont hermetically seal the
battery case
----- Original Message -----
From: "Don Collie" <donmer@xtra.co.nz>
To: <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


> Could the battery be sealed up in a plastic bag, for
> example?.................Don Collie.
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "arthurok" <arthurok@ameritech.net>
> To: <jfor@quik.com>; "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>;
> <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
> Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 2:08 PM
> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
> (acid/alkaline)
>
>
>> maybe some sort of sensitive litmus paper that would detect
>> vapors
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
>> To: "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
>> Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:04 PM
>> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
>> (acid/alkaline)
>>
>>
>>> The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year.
>>> IMO, any
>>> battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly
>>> often.
>>>
>>> In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with
>>> regular
>>> cal
>>> cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds,
>>> the
>>> early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed
>>> before
>>> being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument
>>> is in
>>> private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the
>>> value or
>>> price of the instrument.)
>>>
>>> In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear
>>> because
>>> the
>>> 'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for
>>> cost
>>> accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any
>>> longer.
>>> The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it
>>> was
>>> not
>>> rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business,
>>> such a
>>> procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on
>>> government
>>> contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result.
>>> Hence
>>> $600
>>> toilet seats and high taxes.
>>>
>>> In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as
>>> guilty
>>> as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part
>>> of
>>> the
>>> reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just
>>> goes bad
>>> sitting on a shelf.
>>>
>>> FWIW,
>>> -John
>>>
>>> onamathist wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hi folks.
>>>> Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
>>>> batteries, [snip]
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Yahoo! Groups Links
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Yahoo! Groups Links
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> No virus found in this incoming message.
>> Checked by AVG Free Edition.
>> Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.1/292 - Release Date: 24-Mar-06
>>
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
>



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Computer science Science education


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b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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Don Collie <donmer@...>
 

I see. I suppose the gases vented during charging are corrosive also?

----- Original Message -----
From: "arthurok" <arthurok@ameritech.net>
To: <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>; "Don Collie" <donmer@xtra.co.nz>
Sent: Saturday, March 25, 2006 11:03 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


no; it has to be able to vent so dont hermetically seal the battery case
----- Original Message -----
From: "Don Collie" <donmer@xtra.co.nz>
To: <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 4:22 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


Could the battery be sealed up in a plastic bag, for
example?.................Don Collie.


----- Original Message -----
From: "arthurok" <arthurok@ameritech.net>
To: <jfor@quik.com>; "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>;
<TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 2:08 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


maybe some sort of sensitive litmus paper that would detect
vapors
----- Original Message -----
From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
To: "onamathist" <pstewart@gwi.net>; <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2006 8:04 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors?
(acid/alkaline)


The best method is the calibrated eyeball, applied a few times a year.
IMO, any
battery operated equipment needs to have it's battery looked at fairly
often.

In the past, most of this high end gear was used in companies with
regular
cal
cycles. That cal cycle would have spotted things like the fuzz on NiCds,
the
early signs of a failure, and things like that would have been fixed
before
being returned to service. That just does not happen when the instrument
is in
private hands. (Among other things, a new NiCd pack may well exceed the
value or
price of the instrument.)

In fact, I've gotten a lot of perfectly good Tek (and other) gear because
the
'owner' of the gear (the group it was assigned to within a company for
cost
accounting purposes) was not willing to pay the calibration charges any
longer.
The calibration department puts it in the pound for a while, and if it
was
not
rescued in a few months, it was sold for surplus. In a large business,
such a
procedure does make some sense, especially if you are working on
government
contracts, but perfectly good equipment gets discarded as a result. Hence
$600
toilet seats and high taxes.

In my experience, it's the neglected batteries that leak. I'm likely as
guilty
as anyone else for not taking periodic care of batteries, but it's part
of
the
reason I'm not a real fan of battery powered equipment. The stuff just
goes bad
sitting on a shelf.

FWIW,
-John

onamathist wrote:

Hi folks.
Does anyone know of a good sensing device to sniff out leaky
batteries, [snip]



Yahoo! Groups Links








Yahoo! Groups Links








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Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.1/292 - Release Date: 24-Mar-06



Yahoo! Groups Links







--
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Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.385 / Virus Database: 268.3.1/292 - Release Date: 24-Mar-06


J. Forster <jfor@...>
 

The gases (Hydrogen) is not, per say, corrosive. OTOH, it may well be moist with
tiny droplets of the electrolyte, which is corrosive.

-John



Don Collie wrote:

I see. I suppose the gases vented during charging are corrosive also?


arthurok <arthurok@...>
 

explosive

----- Original Message -----
From: "J. Forster" <jfor@quik.com>
To: "Don Collie" <donmer@xtra.co.nz>
Cc: <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2006 6:13 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


The gases (Hydrogen) is not, per say, corrosive. OTOH, it may well be moist with
tiny droplets of the electrolyte, which is corrosive.

-John



Don Collie wrote:

I see. I suppose the gases vented during charging are corrosive also?





Yahoo! Groups Links






J. Forster <jfor@...>
 

arthurok wrote:

explosive
Not an issue, IMO. The amount of H2 is tiny.

BTW, this is, IMO, trying to guild a very unimportant lily. Just look at the
batteries every few months.
-John


John Crighton <john_c@...>
 

Or simply convert it to mains power only and be done, how often do you
need battery power anyway?
You could always make a connector to hook up a external battery if you
really think you need your scope with you and working on that camping trip
out in the woods ;-)

ST

Hello Stefan,
for field service work, battery power is a great
help and time saver. I worked for a cheapskate
outfit called AWA Marine Service, years ago.
Yes I am being derogatory towards the management
but it was the most interesting job I ever had. The
management were tight fisted when it came to buying
teat equipment for the service department.

Anyway what I leading up to tell you is, we had a
little Philips CRO in the workshop that no one used
because it was only 10 or 15Mhz bandwidth, small
screen, old and tatty.

The service department had a great money spinner
replacing 28V battery packs on EPIRB radio beacons
and checking that they still worked OK.
Here was this pile of battery packs, used but good,
and an old Philips scope.
A holder for the long battery packs was fitted to the
old Philips scope in such a manner that changing
batteries was as easy as changing torch batteries.

That old scope suddenly became highly desirable
amongst the outside service technicians. No longer
did the radar technicians have to drag a long power
lead up to the radar antenna platform on a large
ship. Then carefully pull up a scope such as 2235 on
the end of a rope, up to the platform. The small
Philips scope was easy to carry up the ladders,
hanging on one's arm. No ropes, no long extention
power leads required. What a time saver.

Working on small yachts with HF radio transceivers,
the small Philips was great again. Bringing a yacht
in from a mooring to the wharf so the technician can
have shore power; what a pain. The little old tatty
Philips scope would get the odd splash of salt spray
while being transported on a dinghy and still kept on
working. The Tekscopes were precious and that is
how they were treated but the tatty old Philips scope
because of the battery power suddenly became a work
horse for the service department.
That old Philips CRO modified for battery power
was also very useful for making the dreaded
floating measurements. Oops, sorry for the bad pun!

I have been looking for one of these old Philips
scopes at Hamfests but had no luck yet, just to modify
it for battery use. Very useful. To me anyway.
Well maybe there is a bit of nostalgia there too. :-)

Regards,
John Crighton
Sydney


Chris van Lint
 

Only if they come into contact with something which is moist/wet

Chris

----- Original Message -----
From: Don Collie
To: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, March 25, 2006 11:09 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


I see. I suppose the gases vented during charging are corrosive also?


Chris van Lint
 

Explosion is not really an issue, if it was I think there would have been a few demolished QTH around in the TekScopes community

----- Original Message -----
From: J. Forster
To: arthurok
Cc: Don Collie ; TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, March 25, 2006 11:23 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Battery electrolyte leakage detectors? (acid/alkaline)


arthurok wrote:

> explosive

Not an issue, IMO. The amount of H2 is tiny.

BTW, this is, IMO, trying to guild a very unimportant lily. Just look at the
batteries every few months.
-John



SPONSORED LINKS Science Classic Oscilloscope
Computer science Science education


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a.. Visit your group "TekScopes" on the web.

b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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