Tek Old Timer Question


JanRwl@...
 

In a message dated 5/5/2005 4:14:40 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
Michael.Bender@sun.com writes:


I put the end that I want "stripped" into a small blob of molten
solder on the end of my iron


What you are using there is "Nysol" self-solderable "enamelled wire". Is is
NOT the same chemistry as "Formvar maget wire" which is VERY heat-resistant
(flame will "kill" it).


Dennis Tillman <Dennis@...>
 

Here's a question I'm guessing some of the old Tek employees can answer.

In my youth I worked for Bendix Aerospace (which later became Allied
Aerospace and then something else, etc., etc.). They were a big company at
the time. They made flight control systems which meant they made their own
synchros, servo's etc. These were made in the Transformer Winding Lab where
they had lots of magnet wire, iron and ferrite cores, and coil winding
machinery. I was lucky enough to get into that lab from time to time. As a
result I accumulated a nice collection of enameled magnet wire of all sizes
which I have used over the years to build my own inductors, Tesla coils,
transformer windings, etc.

Whenever the enamel needed to be cleaned off the end of the magnet wire to
tin it the guys in the lab used to dip it into a kind of brownish/black
colored paste they kept in a tin the size of a shoe polish container. They
would leave the paste on the end of the wire for a minute or two. When the
paste was removed the enamel came off with it. This is really handy when you
are dealing with really fine wire like #34 or even finer since you can't
just scrape the enamel off with a knife edge without damaging the wire.

Here's the question(s): Does anyone know what that paste was made of or
where to get more of it? Tek was very proud of their own transformer
facility so what did they use to clean the enamel off the windings in their
transformers?

Thanks, Dennis


stefan_trethan
 

On Thu, 5 May 2005 13:53:01 -0700, Dennis Tillman <Dennis@silicondesigns.com> wrote:



Here's the question(s): Does anyone know what that paste was made of or
where to get more of it? Tek was very proud of their own transformer
facility so what did they use to clean the enamel off the windings in their
transformers?

Thanks, Dennis

Not sure what that paste was, but i have come across 2 enamel stripping methods:

Heat on aspirin tablet with soldering iron (i suggest old iron tho no adverse effects known).

Heat with flame to burn enamel, then plunge into alcohol while still hot to clean copper.

ST


Michael Bender <Michael.Bender@...>
 

Stefan Trethan wrote:
On Thu, 5 May 2005 13:53:01 -0700, Dennis Tillman <Dennis@silicondesigns.com> wrote:

Here's the question(s): Does anyone know what that paste was made of or
where to get more of it? Tek was very proud of their own transformer
facility so what did they use to clean the enamel off the windings in their
transformers?
Not sure what that paste was, but i have come across 2 enamel stripping methods:
Heat on aspirin tablet with soldering iron (i suggest old iron tho no adverse effects known).
Heat with flame to burn enamel, then plunge into alcohol while still hot to clean copper.
I use thin enamel wire for point-to-point wiring for small projects,
and I put the end that I want "stripped" into a small blob of molten
solder on the end of my iron and in a short while, the enamel is gone
(to the great enamel repository in the sky, perhaps :-).

mike


scoper796 <tekscopes@...>
 

Do you plunge into alcohol while still holding the aspirin and the
soldering iron, or do you put them on the bench first?

teehee




--- In TekScopes@yahoogroups.com, "Stefan Trethan"
<stefan_trethan@g...> wrote:
On Thu, 5 May 2005 13:53:01 -0700, Dennis Tillman
<Dennis@s...> wrote:



Here's the question(s): Does anyone know what that paste was made
of or
where to get more of it? Tek was very proud of their own
transformer
facility so what did they use to clean the enamel off the
windings in
their
transformers?

Thanks, Dennis

Not sure what that paste was, but i have come across 2 enamel
stripping
methods:

Heat on aspirin tablet with soldering iron (i suggest old iron tho
no
adverse effects known).

Heat with flame to burn enamel, then plunge into alcohol while
still hot
to clean copper.

ST


stefan_trethan
 

On Thu, 05 May 2005 21:11:47 -0000, scoper796 <tekscopes@telus.net> wrote:

Do you plunge into alcohol while still holding the aspirin and the
soldering iron, or do you put them on the bench first?

teehee

hehe.. no drugs while working please... ;-)

As for the other reply with putting in a blob of solder, works only with solderable kind, not all enamel wires can be stripped that way.

ST


Michael Bender <Michael.Bender@...>
 

Stefan Trethan wrote:

As for the other reply with putting in a blob of solder, works only with solderable kind, not all enamel wires can be stripped that way.
Huh, I didn't know that! I usually just buy "magnet wire" at
Radio Shack or some other electronics outfits and have been
doing this since 1980 without noticing that it doesn't work.

Is there a way to tell if a wire is not solderable (other than
trying to solder it)?

mike


stefan_trethan
 

Huh, I didn't know that! I usually just buy "magnet wire" at
Radio Shack or some other electronics outfits and have been
doing this since 1980 without noticing that it doesn't work.

Is there a way to tell if a wire is not solderable (other than
trying to solder it)?

mike
I have come across some that didn't break down even at temp full up.
At my suppliers some is declared "not solderable", esp. with high-temp wire it seems common.

Once had a reddish variety that didn't work that way, but i don't think color is an indicator.
Most of the wire i've seen can be tinned with your method tho..
You will notice if you pull the drop away if it is not properly tinned...

ST


Dennis Tillman <Dennis@...>
 

Hi Gary,

Strip-X sounds like what I was describing. Now that you mentioned it I do
recall the foul smell. Your description of its physical properties are
identical to what I remember. It is no longer listed in the GC Electronics
catalog but I am hoping I can find a distributor that may still have some on
a shelf collecting dust.

Thanks to everyone else who offered their answers to my question.

Dennis

-----Original Message-----
From: Garey Barrell [mailto:k4oah@mindspring.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2005 2:44 PM
To: Dennis Tillman
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek Old Timer Question

Dennis -

I don't know about TEK, but at NASA in the 60's we used a product called
"Strip-X" by our old friends General Cement (GC). It came in the same
small square bottle that most of their chemicals came in and stunk to
high heaven!! It was a thick, gooey, brown stuff, and you kept the
bottle closed as much as possible. I assume it was some sort of "paint
remover", but so many of the effective chemicals used in the old paint
removers are now outlawed, even paint removers don't work very well any
more.

Belden came out with "enameled" wire back then called Solder-eze, which
was strippable by touching the soldering iron to the end of the wire and
adding some solder. The coating was burned off neatly, leaving clean,
tinned wire. A blob of solder didn't work very well unless you added
some fresh solder (flux) to start the stripping process.

73, Garey - K4OAH
Atlanta


Dennis Tillman wrote:

Here's a question I'm guessing some of the old Tek employees can answer.

In my youth I worked for Bendix Aerospace (which later became Allied
Aerospace and then something else, etc., etc.). They were a big company at
the time. They made flight control systems which meant they made their own
synchros, servo's etc. These were made in the Transformer Winding Lab where
they had lots of magnet wire, iron and ferrite cores, and coil winding
machinery. I was lucky enough to get into that lab from time to time. As a
result I accumulated a nice collection of enameled magnet wire of all sizes
which I have used over the years to build my own inductors, Tesla coils,
transformer windings, etc.

Whenever the enamel needed to be cleaned off the end of the magnet wire to
tin it the guys in the lab used to dip it into a kind of brownish/black
colored paste they kept in a tin the size of a shoe polish container. They
would leave the paste on the end of the wire for a minute or two. When the
paste was removed the enamel came off with it. This is really handy when
you
are dealing with really fine wire like #34 or even finer since you can't
just scrape the enamel off with a knife edge without damaging the wire.

Here's the question(s): Does anyone know what that paste was made of or
where to get more of it? Tek was very proud of their own transformer
facility so what did they use to clean the enamel off the windings in their
transformers?

Thanks, Dennis


BillRoberts <broberts1904@...>
 

Dennis, I worked in the field on the bench and as Field Engineer. I
didn't spend enough time at the plant to find out what that stuff is,
although I remember using it when I was at Martin Company in the
fifties. I think it was an acid paste, but as to exact formula - sorry!

Bill Roberts

Dennis Tillman wrote:

Here's a question I'm guessing some of the old Tek employees can answer.

In my youth I worked for Bendix Aerospace (which later became Allied
Aerospace and then something else, etc., etc.). They were a big company at
the time. They made flight control systems which meant they made their own
synchros, servo's etc. These were made in the Transformer Winding Lab
where
they had lots of magnet wire, iron and ferrite cores, and coil winding
machinery. I was lucky enough to get into that lab from time to time. As a
result I accumulated a nice collection of enameled magnet wire of all
sizes
which I have used over the years to build my own inductors, Tesla coils,
transformer windings, etc.

Whenever the enamel needed to be cleaned off the end of the magnet wire to
tin it the guys in the lab used to dip it into a kind of brownish/black
colored paste they kept in a tin the size of a shoe polish container. They
would leave the paste on the end of the wire for a minute or two. When the
paste was removed the enamel came off with it. This is really handy
when you
are dealing with really fine wire like #34 or even finer since you can't
just scrape the enamel off with a knife edge without damaging the wire.

Here's the question(s): Does anyone know what that paste was made of or
where to get more of it? Tek was very proud of their own transformer
facility so what did they use to clean the enamel off the windings in
their
transformers?

Thanks, Dennis


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Miroslav Pokorni
 

If that paste was really striping enamel as you describe, run to the mirror and check if all of your teeth fell out or you still have few remaining. Enamel is pretty tough, that paste must have contained one of more aggressive acids, something even stronger than Stefan's aspirin tablet.

Belden says that their 'Beldsol', trademarked name for solderable magnet wire, would solder at 750 F without insulation removal. I use 800 F tip on my soldering iron for that and it works quite well.



Regards

Miroslav Pokorni.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dennis Tillman" <Dennis@silicondesigns.com>
To: <TekScopes@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 05, 2005 1:53 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] Tek Old Timer Question


Here's a question I'm guessing some of the old Tek employees can answer.

In my youth I worked for Bendix Aerospace (which later became Allied
Aerospace and then something else, etc., etc.). They were a big company at
the time. They made flight control systems which meant they made their own
synchros, servo's etc. These were made in the Transformer Winding Lab where
they had lots of magnet wire, iron and ferrite cores, and coil winding
machinery. I was lucky enough to get into that lab from time to time. As a
result I accumulated a nice collection of enameled magnet wire of all sizes
which I have used over the years to build my own inductors, Tesla coils,
transformer windings, etc.

Whenever the enamel needed to be cleaned off the end of the magnet wire to
tin it the guys in the lab used to dip it into a kind of brownish/black
colored paste they kept in a tin the size of a shoe polish container. They
would leave the paste on the end of the wire for a minute or two. When the
paste was removed the enamel came off with it. This is really handy when you
are dealing with really fine wire like #34 or even finer since you can't
just scrape the enamel off with a knife edge without damaging the wire.

Here's the question(s): Does anyone know what that paste was made of or
where to get more of it? Tek was very proud of their own transformer
facility so what did they use to clean the enamel off the windings in their
transformers?

Thanks, Dennis


Jim Brannigan <jbrannig@...>
 

Strip-X was nasty stuff, but it worked!
I seem to recall that it did not have a long shelf life, it would lose
effectiveness over time.

Jim

Hi Gary,

Strip-X sounds like what I was describing. Now that you mentioned it I do
recall the foul smell. Your description of its physical properties are
identical to what I remember. It is no longer listed in the GC Electronics
catalog but I am hoping I can find a distributor that may still have some
on
a shelf collecting dust.

Thanks to everyone else who offered their answers to my question.

Dennis


regman10
 

As I recall strip-x was basically methylene chloride anyway. Ace hardware
has an adhesive remover that is pretty similar. Nasty stuff - use in a WELL
ventilated area. Flammable and carcinogenic. It'll eat through rubber
gloves.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Jim Brannigan
Sent: Friday, May 06, 2005 4:29 AM
To: dennis@silicondesigns.com; TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Cc: k4oah@mindspring.com
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek Old Timer Question


Strip-X was nasty stuff, but it worked!
I seem to recall that it did not have a long shelf life, it would lose
effectiveness over time.

Jim

Hi Gary,

Strip-X sounds like what I was describing. Now that you mentioned it I do
recall the foul smell. Your description of its physical properties are
identical to what I remember. It is no longer listed in the GC Electronics
catalog but I am hoping I can find a distributor that may still have some
on
a shelf collecting dust.

Thanks to everyone else who offered their answers to my question.

Dennis


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Robert Morein <morepub@...>
 

Not flammable.
However, it is carcinogenic.

----- Original Message -----
From: Gary Alllsebrook
To: 'Jim Brannigan' ; dennis@silicondesigns.com ; TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Cc: k4oah@mindspring.com
Sent: Friday, May 06, 2005 8:11 PM
Subject: RE: [TekScopes] Tek Old Timer Question


As I recall strip-x was basically methylene chloride anyway. Ace hardware
has an adhesive remover that is pretty similar. Nasty stuff - use in a WELL
ventilated area. Flammable and carcinogenic. It'll eat through rubber
gloves.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TekScopes@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Jim Brannigan
Sent: Friday, May 06, 2005 4:29 AM
To: dennis@silicondesigns.com; TekScopes@yahoogroups.com
Cc: k4oah@mindspring.com
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek Old Timer Question


Strip-X was nasty stuff, but it worked!
I seem to recall that it did not have a long shelf life, it would lose
effectiveness over time.

Jim

> Hi Gary,
>
> Strip-X sounds like what I was describing. Now that you mentioned it I do
> recall the foul smell. Your description of its physical properties are
> identical to what I remember. It is no longer listed in the GC Electronics
> catalog but I am hoping I can find a distributor that may still have some
on
> a shelf collecting dust.
>
> Thanks to everyone else who offered their answers to my question.
>
> Dennis



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Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

As I recall strip-x was basically methylene chloride anyway.
Ah - still avaialable in the UK under the brand name "Nitromors" - used as a
paint stripping chemical. Has as gelling agent in it so it stick to a
vertical surface.

Craig