Topics

Unsoldering delicate parts. WAS: Russian/Eastern Europe Tunnel Diodes

 

Removing soldered in delicate parts is SIMPLE if you have the right tool.

What you need are very small heat sinks that clip onto the lead of the part like a tunnel diode.
These simple heat sinks are specifically designed to fit into tiny spaces and protect delicate parts.
Everyone who solders should have at least a couple of these.
What I am talking about should will not cost more than $2.00 to $3.00 each or you paid too much. Here are 3 examples that will work just fine which are so cheap it is ridiculous not to buy them:

* GC Electronics 9077-1 $1.35
* Circuit Specialists HT-156 $2.56
* StewMac Toothless Alligator (Pack of 10) 0532-CU $8.57

To see more examples google "Clip On Heatsink" and go down the list until you come to "Images for clip on heatsink". You will quickly find sites charging up to 10 times for any of the same three I listed above. They won't work any better.

You should not buy or use miniature alligator clips unless they are toothless. The ones with teeth do not make good contact with the lead of a part and they are relatively wide so they can't get into very small spaces.

For years I have been using something very similar but any of those above will work just fine. I use Hunter 51G and Macdonald and Co. "Little Joe Heat Sinks" but I couldn't find either of them on the Internet. This is probably because I bought them 50 years ago. Since I use them at least once a month on average it is probably the cheapest tool I own and I estimate it has cost me about half a cent per use. Not a bad deal!

Dennis Tillman W7pF






--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Mlynch001
 

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 03:28 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:


Removing soldered in delicate parts is SIMPLE if you have the right tool.

What you need are very small heat sinks that clip onto the lead of the part
like a tunnel diode.
These simple heat sinks are specifically designed to fit into tiny spaces and
protect delicate parts.
Everyone who solders should have at least a couple of these.
What I am talking about should will not cost more than $2.00 to $3.00 each or
you paid too much. Here are 3 examples that will work just fine which are so
cheap it is ridiculous not to buy them:

* GC Electronics 9077-1 $1.35
* Circuit Specialists HT-156 $2.56
* StewMac Toothless Alligator (Pack of 10) 0532-CU $8.57

To see more examples google "Clip On Heatsink" and go down the list until you
come to "Images for clip on heatsink". You will quickly find sites charging up
to 10 times for any of the same three I listed above. They won't work any
better.

You should not buy or use miniature alligator clips unless they are toothless.
The ones with teeth do not make good contact with the lead of a part and they
are relatively wide so they can't get into very small spaces.

For years I have been using something very similar but any of those above will
work just fine. I use Hunter 51G and Macdonald and Co. "Little Joe Heat Sinks"
but I couldn't find either of them on the Internet. This is probably because I
bought them 50 years ago. Since I use them at least once a month on average it
is probably the cheapest tool I own and I estimate it has cost me about half a
cent per use. Not a bad deal!

Dennis Tillman W7pF






--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator
Dennis,

You are a wealth of useful information. And now I have something else to locate and buy! I have been occasionally using small hemostats and very gently clamping them to the leads. The problem with this is that of not enough space is always available to do this.

Thank You!

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR

Mlynch001
 

Dennis,

DigiKey has these in stock as well.
Cal Test brand
‎CTM-34C‎ .55 each 200+ in stock

Or

Mueller Brand
BU-34M Micro Size clips .96 each 800+ in stock These are very tiny when compared to the Miniature version below.
BU-34C Miniature Size slips .76 each 55+ in stock

I order all the time from DigiKey anyway, so I will just add some of these to the next order. Saves by shipping one big order, instead of two or three smaller ones.

THANKS AGAIN for the great tip.

Sincerely,

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR

Tom Bowers
 

I have used ChipQuik successfully on some 64 pin chips, it works by melting
a very low temperature alloy with the solder, making it possible to keep
the 64 pins all liquid at once. I would think this would work very well
with 2 or 3 lead devices. (EBay ChipQuik SMD1 Low Temperature Removal
Kit). It's not cheap, but does work well.

Tom Bowers

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 2:43 PM Mlynch001 <@mlynch001> wrote:

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 03:28 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:


Removing soldered in delicate parts is SIMPLE if you have the right
tool.

What you need are very small heat sinks that clip onto the lead of the
part
like a tunnel diode.
These simple heat sinks are specifically designed to fit into tiny
spaces and
protect delicate parts.
Everyone who solders should have at least a couple of these.
What I am talking about should will not cost more than $2.00 to $3.00
each or
you paid too much. Here are 3 examples that will work just fine which
are so
cheap it is ridiculous not to buy them:

* GC Electronics 9077-1 $1.35
* Circuit Specialists HT-156 $2.56
* StewMac Toothless Alligator (Pack of 10) 0532-CU $8.57

To see more examples google "Clip On Heatsink" and go down the list
until you
come to "Images for clip on heatsink". You will quickly find sites
charging up
to 10 times for any of the same three I listed above. They won't work any
better.

You should not buy or use miniature alligator clips unless they are
toothless.
The ones with teeth do not make good contact with the lead of a part and
they
are relatively wide so they can't get into very small spaces.

For years I have been using something very similar but any of those
above will
work just fine. I use Hunter 51G and Macdonald and Co. "Little Joe Heat
Sinks"
but I couldn't find either of them on the Internet. This is probably
because I
bought them 50 years ago. Since I use them at least once a month on
average it
is probably the cheapest tool I own and I estimate it has cost me about
half a
cent per use. Not a bad deal!

Dennis Tillman W7pF






--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator
Dennis,

You are a wealth of useful information. And now I have something else to
locate and buy! I have been occasionally using small hemostats and very
gently clamping them to the leads. The problem with this is that of not
enough space is always available to do this.

Thank You!

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR



Mlynch001
 

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 03:56 PM, Tom Bowers wrote:


I have used ChipQuik successfully on some 64 pin chips, it works by melting
a very low temperature alloy with the solder, making it possible to keep
the 64 pins all liquid at once. I would think this would work very well
with 2 or 3 lead devices. (EBay ChipQuik SMD1 Low Temperature Removal
Kit). It's not cheap, but does work well.

Tom Bowers
Tom,

Thanks for the tip. That ChipQuik is some neat stuff. They also have a lot of other items of interest at their Web Store.


--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR

Bob Albert
 

For me a good solution is the inexpensive 8W soldering iron that runs off a USB supply.  Tiny tip, high but localized temperature.  I haven't tried it on RoHS solder though.  Seems fine for most diodes and stuff.  A little marginal on multilayer boards.
I also use a hot air desoldering unit which can also remove large ICs.  You adjust temperature and air flow according to the situation.
Bob

On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 02:20:28 PM PDT, Mlynch001 <@mlynch001> wrote:

On Thu, Apr  9, 2020 at 03:56 PM, Tom Bowers wrote:


I have used ChipQuik successfully on some 64 pin chips, it works by melting
a very low temperature alloy with the solder, making it possible to keep
the 64 pins all liquid at once. I would think this would work very well
with 2 or 3 lead devices.  (EBay  ChipQuik SMD1 Low Temperature Removal
Kit). It's not cheap, but does work well.

Tom Bowers
Tom,

Thanks for the tip.  That ChipQuik is some neat stuff.  They also have a lot of other items of interest at their Web Store. 


--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR

Jim Ford
 

TekScopes members who are guitar nuts like me will recognize StewMac (Stewart MacDonald) as a luthier (guitar crafter) supply shop.

Like many others, I'm sure, I will add clip-on heatsinks to my next Digi-Key or Mouser or StewMac order.

Thanks!

Jim Ford

------ Original Message ------
From: "Dennis Tillman W7PF" <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 4/9/2020 1:28:47 PM
Subject: [TekScopes] Unsoldering delicate parts. WAS: Russian/Eastern Europe Tunnel Diodes

Removing soldered in delicate parts is SIMPLE if you have the right tool.

What you need are very small heat sinks that clip onto the lead of the part like a tunnel diode.
These simple heat sinks are specifically designed to fit into tiny spaces and protect delicate parts.
Everyone who solders should have at least a couple of these.
What I am talking about should will not cost more than $2.00 to $3.00 each or you paid too much. Here are 3 examples that will work just fine which are so cheap it is ridiculous not to buy them:

* GC Electronics 9077-1 $1.35
* Circuit Specialists HT-156 $2.56
* StewMac Toothless Alligator (Pack of 10) 0532-CU $8.57

To see more examples google "Clip On Heatsink" and go down the list until you come to "Images for clip on heatsink". You will quickly find sites charging up to 10 times for any of the same three I listed above. They won't work any better.

You should not buy or use miniature alligator clips unless they are toothless. The ones with teeth do not make good contact with the lead of a part and they are relatively wide so they can't get into very small spaces.

For years I have been using something very similar but any of those above will work just fine. I use Hunter 51G and Macdonald and Co. "Little Joe Heat Sinks" but I couldn't find either of them on the Internet. This is probably because I bought them 50 years ago. Since I use them at least once a month on average it is probably the cheapest tool I own and I estimate it has cost me about half a cent per use. Not a bad deal!

Dennis Tillman W7pF






--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


 

Hi Tom,
THAT is a great suggestion! I never thought to use it to unsolder a lot of leads at once.

I bought something like it to solder the invisibly tiny wires in the P6042 Current Probe since ordinary soldering temperatures vaporize the wires. I also have some ChipQuik in the refrigerator from when I soldered som SMD parts.

Dennis W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Bowers
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2020 1:57 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Unsoldering delicate parts. WAS: Russian/Eastern Europe Tunnel Diodes

I have used ChipQuik successfully on some 64 pin chips, it works by melting a very low temperature alloy with the solder, making it possible to keep the 64 pins all liquid at once. I would think this would work very well with 2 or 3 lead devices. (EBay ChipQuik SMD1 Low Temperature Removal Kit). It's not cheap, but does work well.

Tom Bowers

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 2:43 PM Mlynch001 <@mlynch001> wrote:

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 03:28 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:


Removing soldered in delicate parts is SIMPLE if you have the right
tool.

What you need are very small heat sinks that clip onto the lead of
the
part
like a tunnel diode.
These simple heat sinks are specifically designed to fit into tiny
spaces and
protect delicate parts.
Everyone who solders should have at least a couple of these.
What I am talking about should will not cost more than $2.00 to
$3.00
each or
you paid too much. Here are 3 examples that will work just fine
which
are so
cheap it is ridiculous not to buy them:

* GC Electronics 9077-1 $1.35
* Circuit Specialists HT-156 $2.56
* StewMac Toothless Alligator (Pack of 10) 0532-CU $8.57

To see more examples google "Clip On Heatsink" and go down the list
until you
come to "Images for clip on heatsink". You will quickly find sites
charging up
to 10 times for any of the same three I listed above. They won't
work any better.

You should not buy or use miniature alligator clips unless they are
toothless.
The ones with teeth do not make good contact with the lead of a part
and
they
are relatively wide so they can't get into very small spaces.

For years I have been using something very similar but any of those
above will
work just fine. I use Hunter 51G and Macdonald and Co. "Little Joe
Heat
Sinks"
but I couldn't find either of them on the Internet. This is probably
because I
bought them 50 years ago. Since I use them at least once a month on
average it
is probably the cheapest tool I own and I estimate it has cost me
about
half a
cent per use. Not a bad deal!

Dennis Tillman W7pF






--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator
Dennis,

You are a wealth of useful information. And now I have something else
to locate and buy! I have been occasionally using small hemostats and
very gently clamping them to the leads. The problem with this is that
of not enough space is always available to do this.

Thank You!

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR







--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Jim Ford
 

IIRC, Chuck Harris cautioned about ChipQuik producing some non-recyclable alloys when used. Just be aware.

That said, ChipQuik does make some silver-bearing solder that one of our suppliers at work (Raytheon Technologies) uses to attach RF power transistors to circuit boards. The original supplier of the solder either went out of business or stopped making it, so we had to find another source. ChipQuik was it. Might be useful for soldering inside Tek scopes?

Jim Ford

------ Original Message ------
From: "Dennis Tillman W7PF" <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: 4/9/2020 2:43:51 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Unsoldering delicate parts. WAS: Russian/Eastern Europe Tunnel Diodes

Hi Tom,
THAT is a great suggestion! I never thought to use it to unsolder a lot of leads at once.

I bought something like it to solder the invisibly tiny wires in the P6042 Current Probe since ordinary soldering temperatures vaporize the wires. I also have some ChipQuik in the refrigerator from when I soldered som SMD parts.

Dennis W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Tom Bowers
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2020 1:57 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Unsoldering delicate parts. WAS: Russian/Eastern Europe Tunnel Diodes

I have used ChipQuik successfully on some 64 pin chips, it works by melting a very low temperature alloy with the solder, making it possible to keep the 64 pins all liquid at once. I would think this would work very well with 2 or 3 lead devices. (EBay ChipQuik SMD1 Low Temperature Removal Kit). It's not cheap, but does work well.

Tom Bowers

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 2:43 PM Mlynch001 <@mlynch001> wrote:

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 03:28 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:

>
> Removing soldered in delicate parts is SIMPLE if you have the right
tool.
>
> What you need are very small heat sinks that clip onto the lead of
> the
part
> like a tunnel diode.
> These simple heat sinks are specifically designed to fit into tiny
spaces and
> protect delicate parts.
> Everyone who solders should have at least a couple of these.
> What I am talking about should will not cost more than $2.00 to
> $3.00
each or
> you paid too much. Here are 3 examples that will work just fine
> which
are so
> cheap it is ridiculous not to buy them:
>
> * GC Electronics 9077-1 $1.35
> * Circuit Specialists HT-156 $2.56
> * StewMac Toothless Alligator (Pack of 10) 0532-CU $8.57
>
> To see more examples google "Clip On Heatsink" and go down the list
until you
> come to "Images for clip on heatsink". You will quickly find sites
charging up
> to 10 times for any of the same three I listed above. They won't
> work any better.
>
> You should not buy or use miniature alligator clips unless they are
toothless.
> The ones with teeth do not make good contact with the lead of a part
> and
they
> are relatively wide so they can't get into very small spaces.
>
> For years I have been using something very similar but any of those
above will
> work just fine. I use Hunter 51G and Macdonald and Co. "Little Joe
> Heat
Sinks"
> but I couldn't find either of them on the Internet. This is probably
because I
> bought them 50 years ago. Since I use them at least once a month on
average it
> is probably the cheapest tool I own and I estimate it has cost me
> about
half a
> cent per use. Not a bad deal!
>
> Dennis Tillman W7pF
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> Dennis Tillman W7PF
> TekScopes Moderator
>
Dennis,

You are a wealth of useful information. And now I have something else
to locate and buy! I have been occasionally using small hemostats and
very gently clamping them to the leads. The problem with this is that
of not enough space is always available to do this.

Thank You!

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR







--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


satbeginner
 

I used chipquick to replace one of the AD converters in my TDS540B.

In this thread is a link to the pictures I took.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/message/145069?p=,,,20,0,0,0::relevance,,Tds540b+repair,20,2,0,13200526

Bob Albert
 

I removed and now cannot reinstall the USB 3.0 connector on my nanoVNA.  The  pitch of the pins is so small I can barely see the individual pins.
Any suggestions on installing this?  It's the solder bridges I fear most.
Bob

On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 02:51:28 PM PDT, satbeginner <@satbeginner> wrote:

I used chipquick to replace one of the AD converters in my TDS540B.

In this thread is a link to the pictures I took.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/message/145069?p=,,,20,0,0,0::relevance,,Tds540b+repair,20,2,0,13200526

Brian Mathews
 

Find someone that repairs cell phones or portable gaming devices. They
would have a microscope and hot air station. That would be the best way to
solder a modern USB port, in my opinion.

Brian W6BRY

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020, 15:37 Bob Albert via groups.io <bob91343=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I removed and now cannot reinstall the USB 3.0 connector on my nanoVNA.
The pitch of the pins is so small I can barely see the individual pins.
Any suggestions on installing this? It's the solder bridges I fear most.
Bob
On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 02:51:28 PM PDT, satbeginner <
@satbeginner> wrote:

I used chipquick to replace one of the AD converters in my TDS540B.

In this thread is a link to the pictures I took.


https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/message/145069?p=,,,20,0,0,0::relevance,,Tds540b+repair,20,2,0,13200526





 

Hi Michael,
I was surprised when I read the datasheet for the Muller BU-34C Micro Size clips. They don't say what the width of the tip is from side to side. Just looking at the picture in their datasheet I can see it is pretty wide. That is not a good feature.

The Muller BU-34M does specify this dimension as 0.20" (5.1mm) which is quite wide and may not fit into a lot of places.

The Macdonald Co. "Little Joe Heat Sink" I often use is 0.086" (2.20mm) wide. That's how much room it needs to fit on the lead. The Hunter 51G comes to a point which is about 0.05" (1.25mm) at its narrowest.

I can't find my GC Electronics 9077-1 but I remember it is very thin. And since it is aluminum you can grind it even thinner if you need to. The copper heatsinks can't be ground down very easily because of the soft nature of copper.

Dennis W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mlynch001
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2020 1:56 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Unsoldering delicate parts. WAS: Russian/Eastern Europe Tunnel Diodes

Dennis,

DigiKey has these in stock as well.
Cal Test brand
‎CTM-34C‎ .55 each 200+ in stock

Or

Mueller Brand
BU-34M Micro Size clips .96 each 800+ in stock These are very tiny when compared to the Miniature version below.
BU-34C Miniature Size slips .76 each 55+ in stock

I order all the time from DigiKey anyway, so I will just add some of these to the next order. Saves by shipping one big order, instead of two or three smaller ones.

THANKS AGAIN for the great tip.

Sincerely,

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Bob Albert
 

On another but similar subject, I replaced the NVRAMs in my Tek 2440 and now it won't work.  I get a nonsense display.  I replaced one of the new ICs with one of the old ones I removed but no difference.  I am feeling perhaps the ICs and my work are not the problem.  I rechecked all the connectors and resoldered all questionable pins and still no normal operation.
What I get is a nonsense display and no reaction from any controls.
Any ideas?
Bob

On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 03:37:33 PM PDT, Bob Albert via groups.io <bob91343=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I removed and now cannot reinstall the USB 3.0 connector on my nanoVNA.  The  pitch of the pins is so small I can barely see the individual pins.
Any suggestions on installing this?  It's the solder bridges I fear most.
Bob
    On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 02:51:28 PM PDT, satbeginner <@satbeginner> wrote:

I used chipquick to replace one of the AD converters in my TDS540B.

In this thread is a link to the pictures I took.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/message/145069?p=,,,20,0,0,0::relevance,,Tds540b+repair,20,2,0,13200526

Bob Albert
 

Brian,
I have a microscope and a hot air station.  I just am not very experienced and am nervous about screwing it up.
Plus the fact that I am, in the words of Abraham Lincoln, four score and seven years old.
Bob

On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 04:42:25 PM PDT, Bob Albert <bob91343@...> wrote:

On another but similar subject, I replaced the NVRAMs in my Tek 2440 and now it won't work.  I get a nonsense display.  I replaced one of the new ICs with one of the old ones I removed but no difference.  I am feeling perhaps the ICs and my work are not the problem.  I rechecked all the connectors and resoldered all questionable pins and still no normal operation.
What I get is a nonsense display and no reaction from any controls.
Any ideas?
Bob
On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 03:37:33 PM PDT, Bob Albert via groups.io <bob91343=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I removed and now cannot reinstall the USB 3.0 connector on my nanoVNA.  The  pitch of the pins is so small I can barely see the individual pins.
Any suggestions on installing this?  It's the solder bridges I fear most.
Bob
    On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 02:51:28 PM PDT, satbeginner <@satbeginner> wrote:

I used chipquick to replace one of the AD converters in my TDS540B.

In this thread is a link to the pictures I took.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/message/145069?p=,,,20,0,0,0::relevance,,Tds540b+repair,20,2,0,13200526

Michael W. Lynch <mlynch003@...>
 

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 06:27 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:


Hi Michael,
I was surprised when I read the datasheet for the Muller BU-34C Micro Size
clips. They don't say what the width of the tip is from side to side. Just
looking at the picture in their datasheet I can see it is pretty wide. That is
not a good feature.

The Muller BU-34M does specify this dimension as 0.20" (5.1mm) which is
quite wide and may not fit into a lot of places.

The Macdonald Co. "Little Joe Heat Sink" I often use is 0.086" (2.20mm) wide.
That's how much room it needs to fit on the lead. The Hunter 51G comes to a
point which is about 0.05" (1.25mm) at its narrowest.

I can't find my GC Electronics 9077-1 but I remember it is very thin. And
since it is aluminum you can grind it even thinner if you need to. The copper
heatsinks can't be ground down very easily because of the soft nature of
copper.

Dennis W7pF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mlynch001
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2020 1:56 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Unsoldering delicate parts. WAS: Russian/Eastern
Europe Tunnel Diodes

Dennis,

DigiKey has these in stock as well.
Cal Test brand
‎CTM-34C‎ .55 each 200+ in stock

Or

Mueller Brand
BU-34M Micro Size clips .96 each 800+ in stock These are very tiny when
compared to the Miniature version below.
BU-34C Miniature Size slips .76 each 55+ in stock

I order all the time from DigiKey anyway, so I will just add some of these to
the next order. Saves by shipping one big order, instead of two or three
smaller ones.

THANKS AGAIN for the great tip.

Sincerely,

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator
Dennis,

I just looked at the datasheets and product catalog. I believe that the .20 or 5.1mm is the width at the widest point, not the working tip. So they taper from the wide finger pad on one end and down to a narrow tip on the other.

Jaw nose width is the important dimension, correct??

BU34M shows these dimensions on the datasheet. (This one is not in the MUELLER Product Catalog that I looked at so I am referring to their individual product data sheet.)

https://www.muellerelectric.com/product_files/231/DS-BU-34M.pdf

Overall length1.10”(28mm),
Overall width 0.20” (5.1mm),
Overall height0.31”(7.9mm),
Jaw nose width = 0.06”(1.5mm)<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

So these are very narrow at 1.5mm or .060"

BU34 C shows these dimensions in the Mueller Product catalog.

https://www.muellerelectric.com/docs/Mueller-Clips.pdf

Connection Jaw opens 0.22" (5.6 mm)
Jaw Nose Width .07" (1.7 mm)<<<<<<<<<<<<
Overall Length: 1.09" (27.78mm)

This one slightly wider at the tip with 1.7mm or about .070"

It looks to me like these are both very narrow at the nose, where they would contact the leads of the component.

Or am i just not seeing the correct dimension or completely misinterpreting what you are saying?

Jack Wills
 

You have a microscope and a hot air tool

You also need some good tweezers, a flux pen (I use a Kester 951) and
solder-wick
.
Its also handy to have some solder paste (which should be kept cold for
storage)

Now you need practice - get a hold of some dead consumer electronics
or scrounge some dead boards from your local PC repair shop.

You don't want to fix them - you just want to practice removing and
replacing parts
until you feel you are ready to work on something you really care about.

Using these tools I can remove and replace a 128 pin LQFP


On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 4:44 PM Bob Albert via groups.io <bob91343=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Brian,
I have a microscope and a hot air station. I just am not very experienced
and am nervous about screwing it up.
Plus the fact that I am, in the words of Abraham Lincoln, four score and
seven years old.
Bob
On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 04:42:25 PM PDT, Bob Albert <
bob91343@...> wrote:

On another but similar subject, I replaced the NVRAMs in my Tek 2440 and
now it won't work. I get a nonsense display. I replaced one of the new
ICs with one of the old ones I removed but no difference. I am feeling
perhaps the ICs and my work are not the problem. I rechecked all the
connectors and resoldered all questionable pins and still no normal
operation.
What I get is a nonsense display and no reaction from any controls.
Any ideas?
Bob
On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 03:37:33 PM PDT, Bob Albert via groups.io
<bob91343=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

I removed and now cannot reinstall the USB 3.0 connector on my nanoVNA.
The pitch of the pins is so small I can barely see the individual pins.
Any suggestions on installing this? It's the solder bridges I fear most.
Bob
On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 02:51:28 PM PDT, satbeginner <
@satbeginner> wrote:

I used chipquick to replace one of the AD converters in my TDS540B.

In this thread is a link to the pictures I took.


https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/message/145069?p=,,,20,0,0,0::relevance,,Tds540b+repair,20,2,0,13200526







Michael W. Lynch <mlynch003@...>
 

BTW, I just got unsubscribed from the supposedly because of a "spamming" issue? So I have had to re-open the account. My posts may look a little bit strange going forward, until I sort this out.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, Arkansas

Bob Albert
 

I also have plenty of tweezers.  I don't have solder paste or a flux pen but I do have some flux paste and can apply it with my tiny screwdrivers (my late father was a watchmaker).
How do I avoid solder bridges?  Worse, the pins seem to be under the connector, making access tricky.
Bob

On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 05:05:22 PM PDT, Jack Wills <jackduanewills@...> wrote:

You have a microscope and a hot air tool

You also need some good tweezers, a flux pen (I use a Kester 951) and
solder-wick
.
Its also handy to have some solder paste (which should be kept cold for
storage)

Now you need practice - get a hold of some dead consumer electronics
or scrounge some dead boards from your local PC repair shop.

You don't want to fix them - you just want to practice removing and
replacing parts
until you feel you are ready to work on something you really care about.

Using these tools I can remove and replace a 128 pin LQFP


On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 4:44 PM Bob Albert via groups.io <bob91343=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

  Brian,
I have a microscope and a hot air station.  I just am not very experienced
and am nervous about screwing it up.
Plus the fact that I am, in the words of Abraham Lincoln, four score and
seven years old.
Bob
    On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 04:42:25 PM PDT, Bob Albert <
bob91343@...> wrote:

  On another but similar subject, I replaced the NVRAMs in my Tek 2440 and
now it won't work.  I get a nonsense display.  I replaced one of the new
ICs with one of the old ones I removed but no difference.  I am feeling
perhaps the ICs and my work are not the problem.  I rechecked all the
connectors and resoldered all questionable pins and still no normal
operation.
What I get is a nonsense display and no reaction from any controls.
Any ideas?
Bob
    On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 03:37:33 PM PDT, Bob Albert via groups.io
<bob91343=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

  I removed and now cannot reinstall the USB 3.0 connector on my nanoVNA.
The  pitch of the pins is so small I can barely see the individual pins.
Any suggestions on installing this?  It's the solder bridges I fear most.
Bob
    On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 02:51:28 PM PDT, satbeginner <
@satbeginner> wrote:

  I used chipquick to replace one of the AD converters in my TDS540B.

In this thread is a link to the pictures I took.


https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/message/145069?p=,,,20,0,0,0::relevance,,Tds540b+repair,20,2,0,13200526







Jack Wills
 

Jack Wills <jackduanewills@...>

5:46 PM (2 minutes ago)

to bob91343=yahoo.com
You may not have the right king of solder paste if you have not been working with surface mount parts.

The stuff you want is tiny balls of solder (like 300 microns!) mixed with flux.
I am currently using Kester ep256

basically you put the solder paste on the PCB pads (you can be a little sloppy).
put the part in place, then heat with hot air until the solder melts.

You will see the surface tension of the molten solder flow under the leads
Don't worry about bridges.

When you all the leads soldered you can clear the bridges.
Apply flux and use soderwick (size #1) and heat to suck up the excess solder.
I sometimes do this using a soldering iron instead of hot air