Topics

What Tektronix means to me

 

Like everyone here I have created a problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. Problem solved.

Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you when you go.

Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products.

IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000. What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000. I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for another $4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software marketing.

Several totally unexpected things happened starting in the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2 years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. 10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible. The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips. TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.

I'm too busy using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is within arm's reach.

Dennis Tillman W7PF



--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Jim Ford
 

Well said, Dennis.My first Tek scope was a 453A in 1992.  Just under $150 at the TRW swap meet in Redondo Beach, California.  Sold it for $150 to a friend 10 years later.  Nice little scope, but I didn't need it at the time because I had acquired 3 Iwatsu (gasp!) scopes as payment for consulting services to a now-defunct start-up company.  I've since sold them all and bought several Tek scopes. I'm giving my wife and kids links to this group and the HP/Agilent/Keysight group so that the members can take some or all of the gear I own in the event of my demise.  Yes, I have a list of it all, at least the test instruments.  The cables, adaptors, components, and whatnot, no way!  I sure hope they don't dumpsterize it all...Jim FordSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20 2:15 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me Like everyone here I have created a problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. Problem solved. Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you when you go. Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products. IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000. What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000. I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for another $4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software marketing.Several totally unexpected things happened starting in the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2 years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. 10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible.  The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips. TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.I'm too busy using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is within arm's reach.Dennis Tillman W7PF-- Dennis Tillman W7PFTekScopes Moderator

Harvey White
 

I understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent experiences.

The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect to go there.

Might we have something on the east coast?

(and yes, I'm annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further from me.)  Still would like to find a 214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A attenuator, not that I've asked before.)


Harvey

On 1/15/2020 5:15 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:
Like everyone here I have created a problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. Problem solved.

Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you when you go.

Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products.

IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000. What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000. I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for another $4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software marketing.

Several totally unexpected things happened starting in the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2 years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. 10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible. The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips. TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.

I'm too busy using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is within arm's reach.

Dennis Tillman W7PF


 

Hi Harvey,
Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.

I had an offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next 20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this time for a BA in Fine Arts.

When I first heard it was possible to build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers. Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software. That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer background with some mainframe experience.

When I tried to do that I found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was. They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers to mainframes. That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual Systems (MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well), the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory) where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek.

After 3 years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.

If you are on the other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3 1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope), and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Harvey White
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

I understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent experiences.

The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect to go there.

Might we have something on the east coast?

(and yes, I'm annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further from
me.) Still would like to find a 214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A attenuator, not that I've asked before.)


Harvey


On 1/15/2020 5:15 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:
Like everyone here I have created a problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. Problem solved.

Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you when you go.

Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products.

IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000. What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000. I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for another $4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software marketing.

Several totally unexpected things happened starting in the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2 years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. 10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible. The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips. TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.

I'm too busy using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is within arm's reach.

Dennis Tillman W7PF







--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Jean-Paul
 

Dear Dennis, very fine note, I am touched! I think we are the same vintage, I have been an EE since 1968.

Ancient history: As a kid, In the 1950s I was fascinated by high voltage, electronics, radio, Tesla coils, lots of surplus in Manhattan's "radio Row" at Cortland Street!
I couldn't afford a scope, even a Heathkit, but bought the Heath manual (OL-1? OM-3?) and built the tube scope in a plywood (!) case with a war surplus 3" long persistence CRT (3RP7)?

I recall first seeing lots of 500 scopes at Lawrence Berkeley and Livermore labs in 1967.
In 1968, as an EE, Federal Scientific had the newly released Tek 454, also 500 series.
By 1973 I got the TM500 instruments and more TEK scopes. By mid 1980s, bought the AA501 and SG505 for audio AD DA work.
In the 1980s..1990s lots of great TEK equipment at the Ham fleas and Silicon Valley auctions. Now the Ham fleas are decimated!
Today, I have 7104, 7904, 7603, lots of plugins (some very rare) and a few spectrum analyzers.
Of course my favorite scope is 246X/B, of which I now have 5!

As a retired EE I have great enjoyment to maintain and fix them.
Wonderful to have a fine laboratory, with state of the art equipment circa 1970-1990s!
My current project is a 2465B PSU with no output, startup circuit or preregulator buck problem.
I can only marvel at the fine engineering, packaging, usability and documentation that went into each TEK scope and module!

Legacy: Years ago a good friend went silent key, he had a huge collection of TEK equipment.
Along with 5 of his friends, we worked a day a week for a YEAR to test, organize and sell on ebay, Ham fleas and CL.
I suggest that we TEK aficionados exchange some photos of our labs and collections, and find a way to pass on this great legacy technology to a new generation!
Perhaps start a new thread or group: "Tek legacy" ?

Vive le Tektronix!

Jon in Paris

Polaraligned
 

Dennis, you have an AMAZING story.

 

For me...I became an Eng. in the late 80s when I discovered Tektronix 4 channel scopes (advert in Radio Electronics) which were equivalent of about 2 year's salary as a fresh graduate in the Caribbean.
They remained out of reach until many years later in 2012 when I acquired a 2465 and then a 2465/A as part of a Battery regeneration product development lab @ home.
They allowed me to develop and commercialize my first patent-able product.
http://www.mic.co.tt/page/green-tech-facility

I got the electronics bug. after seeing Star Wars in 1977 (as a 12 year old) and then buying a Radio Electronics mag. in a grocery check out aisle that offered an R2-D2 lookalike functional Robot project build.
This year I am launching the World's first electronic steel drum sticks (My countries national Instrument) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steelpan

Hope to have it on Amazon later this year. Was hoping to do manufacture in P. Rico...but things are a mess there right now.

Jim Ford
 

Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis!  Did you ever get to work for Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20 10:36 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.I had an offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next 20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this time for a BA in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers. Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software. That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that I found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was. They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers to mainframes. That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual Systems (MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well), the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory) where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3 years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.If you are on the other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3 1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope), and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland. Dennis Tillman W7PF-----Original Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo: TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to meI understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect to go there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.)  Still would like to find a 214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A attenuator, not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. Problem solved.>> Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000. What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000. I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for another $4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software marketing.>> Several totally unexpected things happened starting in the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2 years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. 10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible.  The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips. TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman W7PFTekScopes Moderator

Chuck Harris
 

Having designed battery chargers for the US Army, I would
sure love to see your experimental data on rejuvinating lead
acid batteries.

I worked on that nut for a while, and determined that it was
impractical, as the lead sulfate conversion that occurs in
the lead plates during deep discharge did more than simply coat
and insulate the plates.

Lead sulfate is physically larger than the original mossy lead
in the battery plates, and when allowed to grow to excess, will
break up the mossy lead, and leave it to slough off the plates.
This sloughed off lead and lead sulfate usually ends up in the
bottom of the cell, or pierces the highly porous separators,
where it shorts the cell, ruining the battery.

Even if you could remove all of the accumulated lead sulfate,
the remaining mossy lead in the plates would have seriously
reduced surface area, and the cell's capacity would be a small
fraction of the original capacity.

So, if you have cracked that nut, I would sure like to see the
data.

-Chuck Harris

Ancel wrote:

For me...I became an Eng. in the late 80s when I discovered Tektronix 4 channel scopes (advert in Radio Electronics) which were equivalent of about 2 year's salary as a fresh graduate in the Caribbean.
They remained out of reach until many years later in 2012 when I acquired a 2465 and then a 2465/A as part of a Battery regeneration product development lab @ home.
They allowed me to develop and commercialize my first patent-able product.
http://www.mic.co.tt/page/green-tech-facility

I got the electronics bug. after seeing Star Wars in 1977 (as a 12 year old) and then buying a Radio Electronics mag. in a grocery check out aisle that offered an R2-D2 lookalike functional Robot project build.
This year I am launching the World's first electronic steel drum sticks (My countries national Instrument) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steelpan

Hope to have it on Amazon later this year. Was hoping to do manufacture in P. Rico...but things are a mess there right now.



 

Hi Jim,
The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it sits on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at Tek. But in a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek.

I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have been a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when Stan Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that would soon be its first home.

The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as moderator of TekScopes. Why me?

Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends. Somehow one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me several years ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at the museum. He replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He is now one of my best friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek employees that I will often call him to arrange a lunch with someone at Tek that was legendary. They never refuse. I have had many fascinating lunches with the people I might have known if I had become a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the Tek cafeteria. Tek closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we will have those lunches next.

My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at a swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next room having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days later I asked him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled why I would want his autograph.

Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all the speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks. Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the Windows developers and many of the famous software developers of the mid-1980s that attended the conferences.

By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees that I have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with the covers I will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a good friend of mine that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim Ford
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis! Did you ever get to work for Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20 10:36 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.I had an offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next 20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this time for a BA in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers. Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software. That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that I found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was. They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers to mainframes. That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual Systems (MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well), the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory) where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3 years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.If you are on the other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3 1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope), and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland. Dennis Tillman W7PF-----Original Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo: TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to meI understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect to go there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.) Still would like to find a 214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A attenuator, not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. Problem solved.>> Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000. What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000. I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for another $4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software marketing.>> Several totally unexpected things happened starting in the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2 years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. 10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible. The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips. TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman W7PFTekScopes Moderator





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Abc Xyz
 

Dennis,

I'm curious...of all the Scopes you have been exposed to you say the 7854
is your Favorite. Why is that?

JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 12:57 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Hi Jim,
The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it sits
on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at Tek. But in
a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek.

I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek
employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have been
a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when Stan
Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that would soon
be its first home.

The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as
moderator of TekScopes. Why me?

Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends. Somehow
one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me several years
ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at the museum. He
replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He is now one of my best
friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek employees that I will often
call him to arrange a lunch with someone at Tek that was legendary. They
never refuse. I have had many fascinating lunches with the people I might
have known if I had become a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the
Tek cafeteria. Tek closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we
will have those lunches next.

My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at a
swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next room
having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days later I asked
him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled why I would want his
autograph.

Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at
Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all the
speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks. Bill Gates
and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the Windows
developers and many of the famous software developers of the mid-1980s that
attended the conferences.

By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees that I
have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with the covers I
will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a good friend of mine
that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim
Ford
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis! Did you ever get to work for
Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <
@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20 10:36 PM (GMT-08:00) To:
TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me
Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far away but
saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is not the best way
to start out if your goal is to get there. You never know what you ae
capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike
cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way
I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see
the telescope, and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to
the Keys I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi
Gras three times.I had an offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my
junior year in college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and
assured me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a
different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next 20
years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front
apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a stained
glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this time for a BA
in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to build a computer (a
childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again and began building my
own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few people doing that so I quickly
found a job working on microcomputers. Eventually I became frustrated
because I didn't understand software. That became my next challenge. Once I
learned microcomputer programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my
computer background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that
I found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was. They
were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the mainframe
world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe job with no
success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time sharing company
which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers to mainframes.
That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual Systems
(MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications that
worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a job with
Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well), the industry
standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later that led to a job at
Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it would finally bring me to
the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory) where I would have been 20
years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3 years at Microsoft it became
clear I had the wrong background. They had their pick of graduating
students with an MS in Computer Science or an MBA. So I went back to
college a third time for an MS in Software Engineering. While I was getting
that degree, Microsoft went from 500 people which was small enough that I
knew almost everyone too many thousands of people. I don't like big
companies and there were other opportunities for me now that I had an MS
S.E.If you are on the other side of the earth and looking at a very small
map it may appear that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix
(a few miles from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3
1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far. On
more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New
Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St.
Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope), and
the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and Key West
I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three
times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect to get there. It sounds
like you really want to go. If you can make it to Seattle you have a place
to stay with us. Portland is a train ride away. Beaverton is accesable by
light rail from Portland. Dennis Tillman W7PF-----Original
Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On
Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo:
TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to meI
understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent
experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect to go
there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm annoyed that
Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.) Still would like to find a
214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A attenuator,
not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF
wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a problem my wife will have to
deal with when I am no longer around. She has the phone number of the
vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. Problem solved.>> Now that that's
out of the way I'm not concerned with recyclers and what will come of my
stuff. I plan on enjoying the afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace
storage scope in my coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you
can with you when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every
day. I can explore anything in electronics with the instruments they
designed. I am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of
excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their
products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000.
What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night
propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I ever
made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 years later I
bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000.
I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me just
like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for another
$4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer assembly
language to control the microcomputer hardware I was designing. The next 10
years I had a very rewarding career in microcomputers, mainframes,
operating systems, and software marketing.>> Several totally unexpected
things happened starting in the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet
again. EBay gave me a way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could
never afford back in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and
I joined 2 years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of
expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. 10
years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK Museum as a
showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible. The museum is
preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. Last but not least
we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has become THE professional
repository of Tektronix documents thanks to the tireless work of Kurt
Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into the night, feeding every Tek
document he can find into scanners. He has single-handedly assembled those
papers, manuals, photographs, and comments into a beautiful, easy to use,
library at our finger tips. TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of
Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell
on what will happen to it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes,
the vintageTEK museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix
scope is within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman
W7PFTekScopes Moderator





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator



Chuck Harris
 

JR,

It is the same for me. I used to use a 2465 and a 7904 mostly,
but when I switched to a 7854, it stuck.

I only rarely use it for its digital functions, preferring an old
HP scope more.

I suppose its monster power supply (compared to the 7904), the
digital main frame buttons, and the digital (as opposed to the
Barrie designed vector) readout.... less ripple and flicker.

I know it can't be true, but its CRT seems to flare less than the
7904.

-Chuck Harris

Abc Xyz wrote:

Dennis,

I'm curious...of all the Scopes you have been exposed to you say the 7854
is your Favorite. Why is that?

JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 12:57 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Hi Jim,
The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it sits
on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at Tek. But in
a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek.

I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek
employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have been
a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when Stan
Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that would soon
be its first home.

The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as
moderator of TekScopes. Why me?

Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends. Somehow
one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me several years
ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at the museum. He
replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He is now one of my best
friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek employees that I will often
call him to arrange a lunch with someone at Tek that was legendary. They
never refuse. I have had many fascinating lunches with the people I might
have known if I had become a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the
Tek cafeteria. Tek closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we
will have those lunches next.

My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at a
swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next room
having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days later I asked
him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled why I would want his
autograph.

Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at
Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all the
speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks. Bill Gates
and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the Windows
developers and many of the famous software developers of the mid-1980s that
attended the conferences.

By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees that I
have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with the covers I
will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a good friend of mine
that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim
Ford
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis! Did you ever get to work for
Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <
@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20 10:36 PM (GMT-08:00) To:
TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me
Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far away but
saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is not the best way
to start out if your goal is to get there. You never know what you ae
capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike
cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way
I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see
the telescope, and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to
the Keys I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi
Gras three times.I had an offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my
junior year in college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and
assured me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a
different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next 20
years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front
apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a stained
glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this time for a BA
in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to build a computer (a
childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again and began building my
own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few people doing that so I quickly
found a job working on microcomputers. Eventually I became frustrated
because I didn't understand software. That became my next challenge. Once I
learned microcomputer programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my
computer background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that
I found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was. They
were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the mainframe
world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe job with no
success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time sharing company
which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers to mainframes.
That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual Systems
(MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications that
worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a job with
Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well), the industry
standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later that led to a job at
Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it would finally bring me to
the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory) where I would have been 20
years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3 years at Microsoft it became
clear I had the wrong background. They had their pick of graduating
students with an MS in Computer Science or an MBA. So I went back to
college a third time for an MS in Software Engineering. While I was getting
that degree, Microsoft went from 500 people which was small enough that I
knew almost everyone too many thousands of people. I don't like big
companies and there were other opportunities for me now that I had an MS
S.E.If you are on the other side of the earth and looking at a very small
map it may appear that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix
(a few miles from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3
1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far. On
more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New
Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St.
Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope), and
the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and Key West
I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three
times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect to get there. It sounds
like you really want to go. If you can make it to Seattle you have a place
to stay with us. Portland is a train ride away. Beaverton is accesable by
light rail from Portland. Dennis Tillman W7PF-----Original
Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On
Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo:
TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to meI
understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent
experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect to go
there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm annoyed that
Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.) Still would like to find a
214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A attenuator,
not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF
wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a problem my wife will have to
deal with when I am no longer around. She has the phone number of the
vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. Problem solved.>> Now that that's
out of the way I'm not concerned with recyclers and what will come of my
stuff. I plan on enjoying the afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace
storage scope in my coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you
can with you when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every
day. I can explore anything in electronics with the instruments they
designed. I am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of
excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their
products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000.
What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night
propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I ever
made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 years later I
bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000.
I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me just
like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for another
$4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer assembly
language to control the microcomputer hardware I was designing. The next 10
years I had a very rewarding career in microcomputers, mainframes,
operating systems, and software marketing.>> Several totally unexpected
things happened starting in the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet
again. EBay gave me a way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could
never afford back in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and
I joined 2 years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of
expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. 10
years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK Museum as a
showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible. The museum is
preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. Last but not least
we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has become THE professional
repository of Tektronix documents thanks to the tireless work of Kurt
Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into the night, feeding every Tek
document he can find into scanners. He has single-handedly assembled those
papers, manuals, photographs, and comments into a beautiful, easy to use,
library at our finger tips. TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of
Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell
on what will happen to it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes,
the vintageTEK museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix
scope is within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman
W7PFTekScopes Moderator





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator





 

The 7854 is both analog (400MHz) and digital. It combines the best of both worlds.
As the very first digital lab scope they did many things that were ground breaking. Start with the fact that the 7000 series was designed before the concept of digital scopes could even have be conceived of. It would have been understandable if the already released 7000 plugins were not compatible with it but they all work just fine. The 7854 design team chose to use 10-bit samples when everyone else settled on 8-bits because it was more efficient and less complicated. 10-bit samples make for a much SMOOTHER display of stored traces. It has an astounding vector processing software language built into it that terrified hardware EEs. Tek quickly removed any reference to it from their marketing materials when they got negative feedback about this from potential customers. In 1980 nearly 100% of all hardware engineers viewed programming as black magic. This built in language for processing waveforms was revolutionary. It is unfortunate that this was developed decades before engineers were willing and able to use anything like it. It was the first scope with a GPIB interface so you could talk to it. I wrote an extensive program in 1993 in MSDOS Quick Basic that allowed me to do anything I wanted with my 7854. It took advantage of the GPIB interface to read and store waveforms on disk or to write waveforms back to the 7854 for later display. I wrote programs using the external keyboard and ran the programs on the 7854 or saved them for later use on disk. I could write 20 lines of text on the 7854 CRT. My software automatically calculated and displayed dozens of parameters about any waveform I captured and displayed them on my PC monitor alongside the waveform. As do most BASIC programs it eventually grew so complicated it collapsed under its own weight when I could no longer keep track of the interactions between different sections of it.

Since I knew you would ask what did the results looks like I put six waveforms I captured with it (and all the parameters it calculated) up on TekScopes photo section. They are in:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=238613

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Abc Xyz
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 1:29 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Dennis,

I'm curious...of all the Scopes you have been exposed to you say the 7854 is your Favorite. Why is that?

JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 12:57 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Hi Jim,
The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it
sits on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at
Tek. But in a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek.

I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek
employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have
been a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when
Stan Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that
would soon be its first home.

The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as
moderator of TekScopes. Why me?

Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends.
Somehow one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me
several years ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at
the museum. He replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He
is now one of my best friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek
employees that I will often call him to arrange a lunch with someone
at Tek that was legendary. They never refuse. I have had many
fascinating lunches with the people I might have known if I had become
a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the Tek cafeteria. Tek
closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we will have those lunches next.

My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at
a swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next
room having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days
later I asked him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled
why I would want his autograph.

Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at
Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all
the speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks.
Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the
Windows developers and many of the famous software developers of the
mid-1980s that attended the conferences.

By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees
that I have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with
the covers I will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a
good friend of mine that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jim Ford
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis! Did you ever get to work for
Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <
@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20 10:36 PM (GMT-08:00) To:
TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
me Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far
away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is
not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never
know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I
decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to
San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch,
Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater
in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new
Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.I had an
offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in
college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured
me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a
different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next
20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front
apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a
stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this
time for a BA in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to
build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again
and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few
people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers.
Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software.
That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer
programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer
background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that I
found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was.
They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the
mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers to mainframes.
That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual
Systems
(MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications
that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a
job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well),
the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later
that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it
would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory)
where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3
years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They
had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science
or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in
Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went
from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too
many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were
other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.If you are on the
other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear
that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles
from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3
1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far.
On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from
New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St.
Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope),
and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and
Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to
Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect
to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it
to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride
away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland. Dennis
Tillman W7PF-----Original
Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On
Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo:
TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
meI understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent
experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect
to go there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm
annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.) Still
would like to find a
214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A
attenuator, not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM,
Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a
problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She
has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator.
Problem solved.>> Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned
with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the
afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my
coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you
when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can
explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I
am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of
excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000.
What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night
propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I
ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10
years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000.
I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me
just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for
another
$4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer
assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was
designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in
microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software
marketing.>> Several totally unexpected things happened starting in
the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a
way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back
in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2
years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of
expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay.
10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK
Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible.
The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us.
Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has
become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to
the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into
the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He
has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and
comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips.
TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy
using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to
it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK
museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is
within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman
W7PFTekScopes Moderator





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator







--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Chris J
 

Impressive, David. 


Chris Juried, WRCB719

FCC Licensed RF Coordinator
Audio Engineering Society (AES) Member  
InfoComm-Recognized AV Technologist
http://www.JuriedEngineering.com 
http://www.TubeEquipment.com 
http://www.HistoryOfRecording.com 
http://www.linkedin.com/in/chrisjuried

Email: CJuried@...  
Voice: (954) 478-4355 


This e-mail, and any attachments thereto, is intended only for use by the addressee(s) named herein and may contain legally privileged and/or confidential information. If you are not the intended recipient of this e-mail, you are hereby notified that any distribution or copying of this email, and any attachments thereto, is strictly prohibited. If you have received this email in error, please immediately notify me at (954) 300-9972 and permanently delete the original and any copy of any e-mail and any printout thereof.



On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 6:36 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF<@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> wrote: The 7854 is both analog (400MHz) and digital. It combines the best of both worlds.
As the very first digital lab scope they did many things that were ground breaking. Start with the fact that the 7000 series was designed before the concept of digital scopes could even have be conceived of. It would have been understandable if the already released 7000 plugins were not compatible with it but they all work just fine. The 7854 design team chose to use 10-bit samples when everyone else settled on 8-bits because it was more efficient and less complicated. 10-bit samples make for a much SMOOTHER display of stored traces. It has an astounding vector processing software language built into it that terrified hardware EEs. Tek quickly removed any reference to it from their marketing materials when they got negative feedback about this from potential customers. In 1980 nearly 100% of all hardware engineers viewed programming as black magic. This built in language for processing waveforms was revolutionary. It is unfortunate that this was developed decades before engineers were willing and able to use anything like it. It was the first scope with a GPIB interface so you could talk to it. I wrote an extensive program in 1993 in MSDOS Quick Basic that allowed me to do anything I wanted with my 7854. It took advantage of the GPIB interface to read and store waveforms on disk or to write waveforms back to the 7854 for later display. I wrote programs using the external keyboard and ran the programs on the 7854 or saved them for later use on disk. I could write 20 lines of text on the 7854 CRT. My software automatically calculated and displayed dozens of parameters about any waveform I captured and displayed them on my PC monitor alongside the waveform. As do most BASIC programs it eventually grew so complicated it collapsed under its own weight when I could no longer keep track of the interactions between different sections of it.

Since I knew you would ask what did the results looks like I put six waveforms I captured with it (and all the parameters it calculated) up on TekScopes photo section. They are in:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=238613

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Abc Xyz
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 1:29 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Dennis,

I'm curious...of all the Scopes you have been exposed to you say the 7854 is your Favorite. Why is that?

JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 12:57 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Hi Jim,
The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it
sits on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at
Tek. But in a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek.

I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek
employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have
been a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when
Stan Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that
would soon be its first home.

The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as
moderator of TekScopes. Why me?

Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends.
Somehow one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me
several years ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at
the museum. He replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He
is now one of my best friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek
employees that I will often call him to arrange a lunch with someone
at Tek that was legendary. They never refuse. I have had many
fascinating lunches with the people I might have known if I had become
a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the Tek cafeteria. Tek
closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we will have those lunches next.

My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at
a swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next
room having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days
later I asked him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled
why I would want his autograph.

Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at
Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all
the speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks.
Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the
Windows developers and many of the famous software developers of the
mid-1980s that attended the conferences.

By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees
that I have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with
the covers I will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a
good friend of mine that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jim Ford
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis!  Did you ever get to work for
Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <
@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20  10:36 PM  (GMT-08:00) To:
TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
me Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far
away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is
not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never
know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I
decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to
San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch,
Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater
in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new
Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.I had an
offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in
college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured
me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a
different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next
20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front
apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a
stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this
time for a BA in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to
build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again
and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few
people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers.
Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software.
That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer
programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer
background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that I
found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was.
They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the
mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers to mainframes.
That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual
Systems
(MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications
that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a
job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well),
the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later
that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it
would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory)
where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3
years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They
had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science
or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in
Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went
from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too
many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were
other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.If you are on the
other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear
that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles
from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3
1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far.
On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from
New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St.
Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope),
and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and
Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to
Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect
to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it
to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride
away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland. Dennis
Tillman W7PF-----Original
Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On
Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo:
TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
meI understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent
experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect
to go there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm
annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.)  Still
would like to find a
214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A
attenuator, not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM,
Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a
problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She
has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator.
Problem solved.>> Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned
with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the
afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my
coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you
when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can
explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I
am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of
excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000.
What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night
propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I
ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10
years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000.
I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me
just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for
another
$4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer
assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was
designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in
microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software
marketing.>> Several totally unexpected things happened starting in
the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a
way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back
in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2
years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of
expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay.
10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK
Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible.
The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us.
Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has
become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to
the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into
the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He
has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and
comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips.
TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy
using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to
it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK
museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is
within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman
W7PFTekScopes Moderator





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator







--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Abc Xyz
 

Damn! You are one Gifted Dude!!! :)

JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 3:36 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

The 7854 is both analog (400MHz) and digital. It combines the best of both
worlds.
As the very first digital lab scope they did many things that were ground
breaking. Start with the fact that the 7000 series was designed before the
concept of digital scopes could even have be conceived of. It would have
been understandable if the already released 7000 plugins were not
compatible with it but they all work just fine. The 7854 design team chose
to use 10-bit samples when everyone else settled on 8-bits because it was
more efficient and less complicated. 10-bit samples make for a much
SMOOTHER display of stored traces. It has an astounding vector processing
software language built into it that terrified hardware EEs. Tek quickly
removed any reference to it from their marketing materials when they got
negative feedback about this from potential customers. In 1980 nearly 100%
of all hardware engineers viewed programming as black magic. This built in
language for processing waveforms was revolutionary. It is unfortunate that
this was developed decades before engineers were willing and able to use
anything like it. It was the first scope with a GPIB interface so you could
talk to it. I wrote an extensive program in 1993 in MSDOS Quick Basic that
allowed me to do anything I wanted with my 7854. It took advantage of the
GPIB interface to read and store waveforms on disk or to write waveforms
back to the 7854 for later display. I wrote programs using the external
keyboard and ran the programs on the 7854 or saved them for later use on
disk. I could write 20 lines of text on the 7854 CRT. My software
automatically calculated and displayed dozens of parameters about any
waveform I captured and displayed them on my PC monitor alongside the
waveform. As do most BASIC programs it eventually grew so complicated it
collapsed under its own weight when I could no longer keep track of the
interactions between different sections of it.

Since I knew you would ask what did the results looks like I put six
waveforms I captured with it (and all the parameters it calculated) up on
TekScopes photo section. They are in:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=238613

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Abc
Xyz
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 1:29 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Dennis,

I'm curious...of all the Scopes you have been exposed to you say the 7854
is your Favorite. Why is that?

JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 12:57 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Hi Jim,
The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it
sits on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at
Tek. But in a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek.

I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek
employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have
been a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when
Stan Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that
would soon be its first home.

The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as
moderator of TekScopes. Why me?

Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends.
Somehow one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me
several years ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at
the museum. He replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He
is now one of my best friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek
employees that I will often call him to arrange a lunch with someone
at Tek that was legendary. They never refuse. I have had many
fascinating lunches with the people I might have known if I had become
a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the Tek cafeteria. Tek
closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we will have those
lunches next.

My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at
a swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next
room having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days
later I asked him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled
why I would want his autograph.

Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at
Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all
the speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks.
Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the
Windows developers and many of the famous software developers of the
mid-1980s that attended the conferences.

By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees
that I have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with
the covers I will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a
good friend of mine that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jim Ford
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis! Did you ever get to work for
Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <
@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20 10:36 PM (GMT-08:00) To:
TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
me Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far
away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is
not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never
know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I
decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to
San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch,
Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater
in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new
Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.I had an
offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in
college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured
me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a
different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next
20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front
apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a
stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this
time for a BA in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to
build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again
and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few
people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers.
Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software.
That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer
programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer
background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that I
found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was.
They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the
mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe
job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time
sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers
to mainframes.
That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual
Systems
(MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications
that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a
job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well),
the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later
that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it
would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory)
where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3
years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They
had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science
or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in
Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went
from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too
many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were
other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.If you are on the
other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear
that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles
from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3
1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far.
On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from
New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the
St.
Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope),
and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and
Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to
Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect
to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it
to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride
away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland. Dennis
Tillman W7PF-----Original
Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On
Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo:
TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
meI understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent
experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect
to go there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm
annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.) Still
would like to find a
214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A
attenuator, not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM,
Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a
problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She
has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator.
Problem solved.>> Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned
with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the
afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my
coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you
when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can
explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I
am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of
excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their
products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000.
What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night
propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I
ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10
years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106
probes for $7,000.
I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me
just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for
another
$4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer
assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was
designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in
microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software
marketing.>> Several totally unexpected things happened starting in
the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a
way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back
in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2
years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of
expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay.
10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK
Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible.
The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us.
Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has
become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to
the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into
the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He
has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and
comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips.
TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy
using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to
it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK
museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is
within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman
W7PFTekScopes Moderator





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator







--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator



petertech99h
 

Well said Dennis!  I can see many of us feel that same way. I'll be quick:
The first time I saw a Tek scope was in high school back in '73, only the teacher was allowed to use it, students used mid 60'sHeathkit scopes at the lab benches. The teacher even had the 'Tekscope' publications and from HP too, only the best studentsgot to read them (no bubble gum chewing pls!).
My journey into electronics began in earnest when I got a set of Texas Instruments hardcover databooks in 1974, back then they were
'trade only' not available to hobbyists. A neighbor was a TI employee.
In 1978 I was working in a lab at a university as a junior tech, designing PCBs, assembly, wiring, fabrication later some circuit design too. What struck me was how well the labs were equipped! 7000s were everywhere along with the best of HP and all other makes you could imagine. Then there were the work shops, machinists, cryolabs, on and on. The machinists were old school, back then a few were WW2 guys who claimed to work on the early jets as well.  A few of these old guys still used tools from back in the day - with nazi markings on them, I guess they were not kidding! One machinist 'the master' had a complete machine shop just for himself!  Turns out he worked on the weirdest and hardest stuff.
Why all these guys and gear with no students in our building? Even back then we needed key access, students were the riff raff we pushed out of the way when traveling to different parts of the campus! In 1982 after a new clearance, I was moved to the real programs that kept everybody busy - NASA payloads and FermiLab!
It all made sense! The best of Tek was key - I was glad to be there, what luck!

'73s to all!

Pete

On Thursday, January 16, 2020, 8:01:47 p.m. EST, Abc Xyz <yawrdanza@...> wrote:

Damn! You are one Gifted Dude!!!  :)

JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 3:36 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

The 7854 is both analog (400MHz) and digital. It combines the best of both
worlds.
As the very first digital lab scope they did many things that were ground
breaking. Start with the fact that the 7000 series was designed before the
concept of digital scopes could even have be conceived of. It would have
been understandable if the already released 7000 plugins were not
compatible with it but they all work just fine. The 7854 design team chose
to use 10-bit samples when everyone else settled on 8-bits because it was
more efficient and less complicated. 10-bit samples make for a much
SMOOTHER display of stored traces. It has an astounding vector processing
software language built into it that terrified hardware EEs. Tek quickly
removed any reference to it from their marketing materials when they got
negative feedback about this from potential customers. In 1980 nearly 100%
of all hardware engineers viewed programming as black magic. This built in
language for processing waveforms was revolutionary. It is unfortunate that
this was developed decades before engineers were willing and able to use
anything like it. It was the first scope with a GPIB interface so you could
talk to it. I wrote an extensive program in 1993 in MSDOS Quick Basic that
allowed me to do anything I wanted with my 7854. It took advantage of the
GPIB interface to read and store waveforms on disk or to write waveforms
back to the 7854 for later display. I wrote programs using the external
keyboard and ran the programs on the 7854 or saved them for later use on
disk. I could write 20 lines of text on the 7854 CRT. My software
automatically calculated and displayed dozens of parameters about any
waveform I captured and displayed them on my PC monitor alongside the
waveform. As do most BASIC programs it eventually grew so complicated it
collapsed under its own weight when I could no longer keep track of the
interactions between different sections of it.

Since I knew you would ask what did the results looks like I put six
waveforms I captured with it (and all the parameters it calculated) up on
TekScopes photo section. They are in:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=238613

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Abc
Xyz
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 1:29 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Dennis,

  I'm curious...of all the Scopes you have been exposed to you say the 7854
is your Favorite. Why is that?

  JR

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 12:57 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>
wrote:

Hi Jim,
The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it
sits on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at
Tek. But in a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek.

I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek
employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have
been a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when
Stan Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that
would soon be its first home.

The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as
moderator of TekScopes. Why me?

Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends.
Somehow one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me
several years ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at
the museum. He replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He
is now one of my best friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek
employees that I will often call him to arrange a lunch with someone
at Tek that was legendary. They never refuse. I have had many
fascinating lunches with the people I might have known if I had become
a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the Tek cafeteria. Tek
closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we will have those
lunches next.

My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at
a swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next
room having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days
later I asked him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled
why I would want his autograph.

Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at
Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all
the speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks.
Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the
Windows developers and many of the famous software developers of the
mid-1980s that attended the conferences.

By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees
that I have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with
the covers I will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a
good friend of mine that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Jim Ford
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis!  Did you ever get to work for
Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <
@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20  10:36 PM  (GMT-08:00) To:
TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
me Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far
away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is
not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never
know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I
decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to
San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch,
Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater
in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new
Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.I had an
offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in
college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured
me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a
different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next
20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front
apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a
stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this
time for a BA in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to
build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again
and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few
people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers.
Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software.
That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer
programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer
background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that I
found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was.
They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the
mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe
job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time
sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers
to mainframes.
That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual
Systems
(MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications
that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a
job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well),
the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later
that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it
would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory)
where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3
years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They
had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science
or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in
Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went
from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too
many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were
other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.If you are on the
other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear
that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles
from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3
1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far.
On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from
New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the
St.
Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope),
and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and
Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to
Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect
to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it
to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride
away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland. Dennis
Tillman W7PF-----Original
Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On
Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo:
TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to
meI understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent
experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect
to go there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm
annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.)  Still
would like to find a
214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A
attenuator, not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM,
Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a
problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She
has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator.
Problem solved.>> Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned
with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the
afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my
coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you
when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can
explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I
am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of
excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their
products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000.
What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night
propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I
ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10
years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106
probes for $7,000.
I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me
just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for
another
$4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer
assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was
designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in
microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software
marketing.>> Several totally unexpected things happened starting in
the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a
way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back
in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2
years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of
expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay.
10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK
Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible.
The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us.
Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has
become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to
the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into
the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He
has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and
comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips.
TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy
using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to
it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK
museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is
within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman
W7PFTekScopes Moderator





--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator







--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator



Tam Hanna
 

Hello Dennis,

sorry to bug you.


May I have these pictures for my Instagram? I would, of course, mention you as my source!


All the best from Budapest

Tam, still somewhat ill

--
With best regards
Tam HANNA

Enjoy electronics? Join 15k7 other followers by visiting the Crazy Electronics Lab at https://www.instagram.com/tam.hanna/

 

Hi Tam,
This (below) is what I said in the last sentence of my last message. The URL was in it so anyone who was interested could take a look at them.
"Since I knew you would ask what did the results looks like I put six waveforms I captured with it (and all the parameters it calculated) up on TekScopes photo section. They are in:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=238613
"
Please remember this was 1993 and I was exploring all the simple BASIC programs Tek provided in their 7854 Application notes. They showed how to connect to the 7854 via GPIB. It was my first time using GPIB so I had to learn how that worked and I had to overcome glitches with how the GPIB card worked.
Once I was able to communicate with the scope the program got very big very quickly as I added one capability after another. For example:
1) Reading and writing text to/from the screen,
2) Downloading waveforms and saving them to disk,
3) Uploading waveforms to the CRT or to different waveform storage locations,
4) Downloading programs that I created using the external keyboard and saving them to disk,
5) Uploading programs to the 7854 from disk,
6) Writing programs in Edit (I don't think Notebook was around then) on my PC and uploading them to the 7854.
There were many more things I don't recall that I did. It was really fun. Of course after you are finally able to make something work you understand how you should have done it in the first place.

"The knowledge you need to succeed is elusive until you succeed and then hindsight tells you how you should have done it from the start."

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Tam Hanna
Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 7:32 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me

Hello Dennis,
sorry to bug you.
May I have these pictures for my Instagram? I would, of course, mention you as my source!
All the best from Budapest
Tam, still somewhat ill--
With best regards
Tam HANNA
Enjoy electronics? Join 15k7 other followers by visiting the Crazy Electronics Lab at https://www.instagram.com/tam.hanna/



--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator

Jim Ford
 

Honorary Tek employee; how cool is that?!Closest I ever came to that was an interview at HP in Palo Alto in 1988, just before I graduated from Case Western Reserve University with a BSEE.  I took the red-eye flight back to Cleveland just in time to give my senior project presentation!  They hired another guy who had had a summer job there.  I ended up working at the Lockheed Skunk Works in Burbank after graduation and stayed there for 5 years until I got laid off.Yep, the 7854 is on my wishlist!  I'd like one for trace averaging, among other things.  I understand it's possible to reduce the effective jitter to 0 ps under certain conditions.  Plus I already have a 7B87 and am itching to connect a 10 MHz sampling clock from my Leo Bodnar GPSDO.  Why?  Because I can, of course!OTOH, my experience with my 7904, 7S12, 7S11, S-4 sampling heads, and S-51 or S-53 trigger heads is not that great.  Those things are a real PITA to get working, as you know well.  The prospect of getting a 11800 series scope with the killer SD-24 sampling/TDR head for $1k or less is looking better and better.  I had such a setup at the 2nd Lockheed company I worked for, and I don't recall anywhere near as much difficulty with it.We shall see how things play out.  There's always the SWMBO (She Who Must Be Obeyed) factor.  The wife doesn't share my appreciation for vintage and modern test equipment ("your machines" she calls them, at least to my face!).Great chatting with you, Dennis, albeit electronically and over a fairly long distance and timescale. JimSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/16/20 12:57 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me Hi Jim,The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it sits on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at Tek. But in a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek. I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have been a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when Stan Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that would soon be its first home. The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as moderator of TekScopes. Why me?Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends. Somehow one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me several years ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at the museum. He replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He is now one of my best friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek employees that I will often call him to arrange a lunch with someone at Tek that was legendary. They never refuse. I have had many fascinating lunches with the people I might have known if I had become a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the Tek cafeteria. Tek closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we will have those lunches next.My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at a swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next room having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days later I asked him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled why I would want his autograph.Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all the speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks. Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the Windows developers and many of the famous software developers of the mid-1980s that attended the conferences.By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees that I have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with the covers I will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a good friend of mine that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.Dennis Tillman W7PF-----Original Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Jim FordSent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AMTo: TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to meHey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis!  Did you ever get to work for Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20  10:36 PM  (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.I had an offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next 20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this time for a BA in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers. Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software. That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that I found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was. They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers to mainframes. That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual Systems (MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well), the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory) where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3 years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.If you are on the other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3 1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far. On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope), and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland. Dennis Tillman W7PF-----Original Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo: TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to meI understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect to go there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.)  Still would like to find a 214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A attenuator, not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM, Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. Problem solved.>> Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000. What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000. I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for another $4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software marketing.>> Several totally unexpected things happened starting in the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2 years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. 10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible.  The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips. TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman W7PFTekScopes Moderator-- Dennis Tillman W7PFTekScopes Moderator

Jim Ford
 

Crap, Dennis, now you make me want a 7854 even more!  Fortunately I know several people who will gladly sell me one when the time comes.  Got to satisfy my frequency domain cravings first.I'm chuckling that HW jocks would fear the internal Tek SW language!  The one and only time I wrote software for a living was the summer of 1987 when I worked in a medical research lab at CWRU.  They had an Apple ][ with 8 inch floppy drives, and it was ancient even back then.  Turns out Apple stored the program lines just adjacent to the "hi-res" graphics page.  So as I added features to the data acquisition program I was writing, I got to the point where these strange lines appeared on the screen!  A different way of collapsing under its own weight!  And one sure way to curtail scope creep.Great story!JimSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/16/20 3:36 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me The 7854 is both analog (400MHz) and digital. It combines the best of both worlds.As the very first digital lab scope they did many things that were ground breaking. Start with the fact that the 7000 series was designed before the concept of digital scopes could even have be conceived of. It would have been understandable if the already released 7000 plugins were not compatible with it but they all work just fine. The 7854 design team chose to use 10-bit samples when everyone else settled on 8-bits because it was more efficient and less complicated. 10-bit samples make for a much SMOOTHER display of stored traces. It has an astounding vector processing software language built into it that terrified hardware EEs. Tek quickly removed any reference to it from their marketing materials when they got negative feedback about this from potential customers. In 1980 nearly 100% of all hardware engineers viewed programming as black magic. This built in language for processing waveforms was revolutionary. It is unfortunate that this was developed decades before engineers were willing and able to use anything like it. It was the first scope with a GPIB interface so you could talk to it. I wrote an extensive program in 1993 in MSDOS Quick Basic that allowed me to do anything I wanted with my 7854. It took advantage of the GPIB interface to read and store waveforms on disk or to write waveforms back to the 7854 for later display. I wrote programs using the external keyboard and ran the programs on the 7854 or saved them for later use on disk. I could write 20 lines of text on the 7854 CRT. My software automatically calculated and displayed dozens of parameters about any waveform I captured and displayed them on my PC monitor alongside the waveform. As do most BASIC programs it eventually grew so complicated it collapsed under its own weight when I could no longer keep track of the interactions between different sections of it.Since I knew you would ask what did the results looks like I put six waveforms I captured with it (and all the parameters it calculated) up on TekScopes photo section. They are in: https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=238613Dennis Tillman W7PF-----Original Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Abc XyzSent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 1:29 PMTo: TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to meDennis, I'm curious...of all the Scopes you have been exposed to you say the 7854 is your Favorite. Why is that? JROn Thu, Jan 16, 2020, 12:57 PM Dennis Tillman W7PF <@Dennis_Tillman_W7pF>wrote:> Hi Jim,> The job offer letter from Tektronix is laminated on a plaque where it > sits on my wall along side my diplomas. No. I never went to work at > Tek. But in a way I got to become an honorary member of Tek.>> I have been embraced by everyone I meet that is a current or ExTek > employee. I have been included in their private mail reflector, I have > been a member of the vintageTEK Museum since before it opened when > Stan Griffiths first took me over to see the empty store front that > would soon be its first home.>> The biggest surprise was when Michael Dunn asked me to take over as > moderator of TekScopes. Why me?>> Usually 4 times a year I am in Beaverton visiting my Tek friends. > Somehow one of the most famous design engineers at Tek heard about me > several years ago and quite by accident I introduced myself to him at > the museum. He replied "You're Dennis Tillman!" which stunned me. He > is now one of my best friends. He is so highly regarded among ex-Tek > employees that I will often call him to arrange a lunch with someone > at Tek that was legendary. They never refuse. I have had many > fascinating lunches with the people I might have known if I had become > a Tek employee. We often met for lunch in the Tek cafeteria. Tek > closed the cafeteria last month so I'm not sure where we will have those lunches next.>> My favorite scope is the 7854. When I mentioned this to Deane Kidd at > a swap meet one day he said the 7854 project manager was in the next > room having a bite to eat and he introduced me to him. A few days > later I asked him to autograph the cover of my 7854. He was puzzled > why I would want his autograph.>> Asking for autographs was something I had started to do when I was at > Microsoft. For each Software Developer Conference I held I asked all > the speakers to autograph their section of the conference notebooks. > Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer's signatures are in them as are all the > Windows developers and many of the famous software developers of the > mid-1980s that attended the conferences.>> By now that 7854 cover is so full of autographs of ex-Tek employees > that I have had to switch to the other cover. When I'm all done with > the covers I will give them to the 7854 Project Manager who is now a > good friend of mine that I see every time I'm at a swap meet.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>> -----Original Message-----> From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of > Jim Ford> Sent: Thursday, January 16, 2020 6:48 AM> To: TekScopes@groups.io> Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to me>> Hey, don't keep us in suspense, Dennis!  Did you ever get to work for > Tek?Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone> -------- Original message --------From: Dennis Tillman W7PF < > @Dennis_Tillman_W7pF> Date: 1/15/20  10:36 PM  (GMT-08:00) To:> TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to > me Hi Harvey,Yes, there is no simple solution to things being too far > away but saying "I never expect to go there" (to the Tek Museum) is > not the best way to start out if your goal is to get there. You never > know what you ae capable of until you try. On more than one occasion I > decided to hitch hike cross country from New Jersey to LA and up to > San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St. Louis Gateway Arch, > Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar to see the telescope, and the meteor crater > in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys I stopped at the new > Disney World in Orlando. I've been to Mardi Gras three times.I had an > offer to join Tek in 1968 when I was starting my junior year in > college. But they recommended that I get my degree first and assured > me that the job would still be there when I did. Life took me in a > different direction by the time I got my BS E.E. degree. For the next > 20 years I regretted that mistake. Instead I moved into a beach front > apartment on the New Jersey shore and, to my surprise, I became a > stained glass artist and beach comer and I went back to college, this > time for a BA in Fine Arts. When I first heard it was possible to > build a computer (a childhood dream of mine) I changed direction again > and began building my own S-100 microcomputer. There were very few > people doing that so I quickly found a job working on microcomputers. > Eventually I became frustrated because I didn't understand software. > That became my next challenge. Once I learned microcomputer > programming I thought it would be smart to broaden my computer > background with some mainframe experience. When I tried to do that I > found out very few head hunters even knew what a microcomputer was. > They were focused on filling the thousands of jobs available in the > mainframe world. So I spent the next 6 months trying to get a mainframe job with no success. Eventually I was hired by an IBM 370 based time sharing company which saw there was an opportunity linking microcomputers to mainframes.> That exposed me to IBM's premier operating system: Multiple Virtual > Systems> (MVS) and the many different IBM operating systems and applications > that worked under MVS. Three years later someone recommended me for a > job with Digital Research, the creator of CP/M (which I knew well), > the industry standard 8-bit OS on microcomputers. Four years later > that led to a job at Microsoft which I was desperate to get because it > would finally bring me to the Pacific Northwest (Tektronix territory) > where I would have been 20 years earlier if I had joined Tek. After 3 > years at Microsoft it became clear I had the wrong background. They > had their pick of graduating students with an MS in Computer Science > or an MBA. So I went back to college a third time for an MS in > Software Engineering. While I was getting that degree, Microsoft went > from 500 people which was small enough that I knew almost everyone too > many thousands of people. I don't like big companies and there were > other opportunities for me now that I had an MS S.E.If you are on the > other side of the earth and looking at a very small map it may appear > that Microsoft (a few miles from Seattle), and Tektronix (a few miles > from Portland) are right next to each other. It is a boring 3> 1/2 hour trip to get there. Sphere Research is more than twice as far. > On more than one occasion I decided to hitch hike cross country from > New Jersey to LA and up to San Francisco. Along the way I stopped at the St.> Louis Gateway Arch, Grand Canyon, Mt Palomar (to see the telescope), > and the meteor crater in Arizona. On another trip down to the Keys and > Key West I stopped at the new Disney World in Orlando. I've been to > Mardi Gras three times. You shouldn't say things like I never expect > to get there. It sounds like you really want to go. If you can make it > to Seattle you have a place to stay with us. Portland is a train ride > away. Beaverton is accesable by light rail from Portland. Dennis > Tillman W7PF-----Original> Message-----From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On > Behalf Of Harvey WhiteSent: Wednesday, January 15, 2020 5:28 PMTo:> TekScopes@...: Re: [TekScopes] What Tektronix means to > meI understand what you say, parallel to an extent, not congruent > experiences.The Tek museum is 3000 miles from me, and I never expect > to go there.Might we have something on the east coast?(and yes, I'm > annoyed that Sphere's "free" days are even further fromme.)  Still > would like to find a> 214 vertical amplifier board because mine has a bad channel A > attenuator, not that I've asked before.)HarveyOn 1/15/2020 5:15 PM, > Dennis Tillman W7PF wrote:> Like everyone here I have created a > problem my wife will have to deal with when I am no longer around. She > has the phone number of the vintageTEK Museum on our refrigerator. > Problem solved.>> Now that that's out of the way I'm not concerned > with recyclers and what will come of my stuff. I plan on enjoying the > afterlife with a Tek 214 portable dual-trace storage scope in my > coffin. The Egyptians had the right idea. Take what you can with you > when you go.>> Tektronix gives me a reason to get up every day. I can > explore anything in electronics with the instruments they designed. I > am the beneficiary of the legacy of Tektronix; the standard of > excellence they strove for; and the support they provided for their products.>> IN 1967 I bought my first Tek scope, a 453, new for $2,000.> What I learned in the next two years by using that scope every night > propelled me to the top of my class. That was the best investment I > ever made. Tektronix instruments were investments in my future. 10 > years later I bought a 7704A / 7A26 / 7B80 / 7B85 and a pair of P6106 probes for $7,000.> I went into debt to do this because I knew it would pay off for me > just like my 453 had. Two years later I bought a 7D01 / DF2 / DL2 for > another> $4,000 to study microcomputers. I eagerly learned microcomputer > assembly language to control the microcomputer hardware I was > designing. The next 10 years I had a very rewarding career in > microcomputers, mainframes, operating systems, and software > marketing.>> Several totally unexpected things happened starting in > the late 1990s that were to enrich my life yet again. EBay gave me a > way to buy all of the Tektronix instruments I could never afford back > in the 1970s. In 2000 Michael Dunn started TekScopes and I joined 2 > years later. Suddenly I was not alone. I had a vast resource of > expertise to help me fix all the Tek instruments I was buying on eBay. > 10 years ago Stan Griffiths and Ed Sinclair started the vintageTEK > Museum as a showcase for all the things Tektronix had made possible.> The museum is preserving the Tek legacy for the benefit of all of us. > Last but not least we have our own specialized Wikipedia. TekWiki has > become THE professional repository of Tektronix documents thanks to > the tireless work of Kurt Rosenfeld. Working long hours alone, into > the night, feeding every Tek document he can find into scanners. He > has single-handedly assembled those papers, manuals, photographs, and > comments into a beautiful, easy to use, library at our finger tips. > TekWiki is every bit that is the rival of Wikipedia.>> I'm too busy > using my collection of Tek instruments to dwell on what will happen to > it someday. Because of Tektronix, eBay, TekScopes, the vintageTEK > museum, and TekWiki my life is never dull when a Tektronix scope is > within arm's reach.>> Dennis Tillman W7PF>>>-- Dennis Tillman > W7PFTekScopes Moderator>>>>>> --> Dennis Tillman W7PF> TekScopes Moderator>> >>-- Dennis Tillman W7PFTekScopes Moderator