Topics

Tek 576 Curve Tracer USB port to a cpu ... ?


garp66
 

hi,

Has anyone thought of interfacing a Tek 576 Curve Tracer (Or any of the other Tek Curve Tracers) to a laptop via USB ?

I have been thinking of putting an Arduino or Rasp Pi inside a Tek 576, with a few A/D & D I/O shields to get the data out for comparisons and automated measurements.

I just saw this YouTube Demo of a "pricy" USB conversion :
(dated Jan 30, 2019)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSMqD5iwj4U

done by Tuntien of
https://equiptek.com/000.htm

rick


Mlynch001
 

Seems like they are getting a premium for their interface. But they are also the only game in town. If you want to play, I suppose one should prepare to pay dearly? I wish some of the brilliant minds in the group would come up with something reasonable. Arduino or Raspberry Pi seem to have potential, I am not at all familiar with either.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


Eric
 

Arduino has potential Pi is too much like a computer... well is a computer. I have had this rolling around in my head for a while as to how to do this, I was even thinking of omitting all the HV stuff tapping off the CRT driver pins digitizing the inputs and driving a VGA port with them. Some challenges I have come across already. computer monitors are raster driven. Not X-Y driven so we would need to time the raster. Not TOO huge a deal with a curve tracer but a scope the sweeps are WAY to fast for a computer monitor. Color not really an issue due to the curve tracers being monochrome. You can just set some values and make it a color. The 576 has a sweep rate of 60Hz so it would lend its self to a conversion however the BIG one is how to get the grid lines on the image. These would have to be driven digitally given they are etched in to the glass. So not sure how to do that part yet but I think an Arduino has 1024 value ADC full scale. Then of course can we get it through a calibration process to aline everything. We would need about 60FPS at a res of 1024x768 monochrome with and adjustable persistence as a possible feature upgrade to aid in the matching of transistors. By REALLY being able to over lay the traces. But I really like the idea of a 576 with a 19 inch screen.

On 1/6/2020 6:40 PM, Mlynch001 wrote:
Seems like they are getting a premium for their interface. But they are also the only game in town. If you want to play, I suppose one should prepare to pay dearly? I wish some of the brilliant minds in the group would come up with something reasonable. Arduino or Raspberry Pi seem to have potential, I am not at all familiar with either.


garp66
 

hi,

My main thought of automating the Tek 576 was to gain access to the switch settings via the mechanical relays,

-- which then led to the obvious thought of * replacing the sometimes problematic Tek 576 mechanical relays * with Mosfets, and thereby have the abilityy
monitor & control those settings.
( See other recent post about Tek 576 relay replacement with SS ... discussion ).

The CRT video data is also important to acquire, so that is doable, as the recent USB upgrade has shown.

EpiPhan had some products (not cheap, but are sometimes on eBay) that allow instrument video (at different video rates) to be acquired and easily USB'ed to a laptop. This has been used in a bunch of HP instruments, and works well.

https://www.epiphan.com

I am betting that this is what the Equiptek fellow has done, or something similar.

The Tek 576 has a real use way beyond a typical instrument lifetime.

Some of the mods I am discussing might have been already done in the design of the Tek 370, 371 & 372 Curve Tracers ?
Is there a Tek person out there that worked on those newer CT's able to chime-in about this ??
rick


John Griessen
 

On 1/7/20 10:38 AM, garp66 wrote:
EpiPhan had some products (not cheap, but are sometimes on eBay) that allow instrument video (at different video rates) to be acquired and easily USB'ed to a laptop. This has been used in a bunch of HP instruments, and works well.
If it is not cheap there are inexpensive alternatives That allow a standalone display that is small, and also serial data out to put graphs on a larger screen. Here is a design that works with an added OLED display connected as IC2 serially addressed memory is, and the data can go out the USP port also. It is based on micropython: https://github.com/kanzure/culture_shock

This would need a little refinement of the resistive divider so it can be calibrated -- probably add IC2 digital pots. When you have a voltage divider and ADC working well, you could go standalone and drop the 576. The big cost is development time.

With an ADC add-on you could use a laptop sometimes, but always have a small view at the data of a single shot pulsed test.
Probably magnify and pan around to see data would not be too hard to code. Another way is to go ahead and spend on larger LCD displays with backlight for a standalone curve tracer that fully replaces the 576.


Harvey White
 

I'd be looking into the curve tracer to find a point where the inputs are all standardized.  The low speed of the trace is very helpful, you'd need a synch pulse (start of trace) and then want to digitize (AVR or a separate chip, suggest two chips, one for vert, one for horizontal).

Delay in the processor or in hardware, digitize the trace (processor captures), then you take the data, feed it to a computer (RS-232  interface to USB), then display that on the computer screen.

You could do a sequential a/d, have to synchronize it with start of sweep, and then go from there.

If you have a way of digitizing the position of the scale/sensitivity adjustments, you can correct trace to real data.

Harvey

On 1/6/2020 8:38 PM, Eric wrote:
Arduino has potential Pi is too much like a computer... well is a computer. I have had this rolling around in my head for a while as to how to do this, I was even thinking of omitting all the HV stuff tapping off the CRT driver pins digitizing the inputs and driving a VGA port with them. Some challenges I have come across already. computer monitors are raster driven. Not X-Y driven so we would need to time the raster. Not TOO huge a deal with a curve tracer but a scope the sweeps are WAY to fast for a computer monitor. Color not really an issue due to the curve tracers being monochrome. You can just set some values and make it a color. The 576 has a sweep rate of 60Hz so it would lend its self to a conversion however the BIG one is how to get the grid lines on the image. These would have to be driven digitally given they are etched in to the glass. So not sure how to do that part yet but I think an Arduino has 1024 value ADC full scale. Then of course can we get it through a calibration process to aline everything. We would need about 60FPS at a res of 1024x768 monochrome with and adjustable persistence as a possible feature upgrade to aid in the matching of transistors. By REALLY being able to over lay the traces. But I really like the idea of a 576 with a 19 inch screen.

On 1/6/2020 6:40 PM, Mlynch001 wrote:
Seems like they are getting a premium for their interface.  But they are also the only game in town.  If you want to play, I suppose one should prepare to pay dearly?  I wish some of the brilliant minds in the group would come up with something reasonable.  Arduino or Raspberry Pi seem to have potential, I am not at all familiar with either.



Miguel Work
 

I was studying the schemes, the gain of the amplifiers is switched with relays on the same deflector plates. The same voltage of the deflector plates should be read with a differential amplifier.

Sometimes I used an digital oscilloscope to read directly voltage plates on xy


-----Mensaje original-----
De: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] En nombre de Harvey White
Enviado el: martes, 7 de enero de 2020 19:36
Para: TekScopes@groups.io
Asunto: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 576 Curve Tracer USB port to a cpu ... ?

I'd be looking into the curve tracer to find a point where the inputs are all standardized.  The low speed of the trace is very helpful, you'd need a synch pulse (start of trace) and then want to digitize (AVR or a separate chip, suggest two chips, one for vert, one for horizontal).

Delay in the processor or in hardware, digitize the trace (processor captures), then you take the data, feed it to a computer (RS-232 interface to USB), then display that on the computer screen.

You could do a sequential a/d, have to synchronize it with start of sweep, and then go from there.

If you have a way of digitizing the position of the scale/sensitivity adjustments, you can correct trace to real data.

Harvey

On 1/6/2020 8:38 PM, Eric wrote:
Arduino has potential Pi is too much like a computer... well is a
computer. I have had this rolling around in my head for a while as to
how to do this, I was even thinking of omitting all the HV stuff
tapping off the CRT driver pins digitizing the inputs and driving a
VGA port with them. Some challenges I have come across already.
computer monitors are raster driven. Not X-Y driven so we would need
to time the raster. Not TOO huge a deal with a curve tracer but a
scope the sweeps are WAY to fast for a computer monitor. Color not
really an issue due to the curve tracers being monochrome. You can
just set some values and make it a color. The 576 has a sweep rate of
60Hz so it would lend its self to a conversion however the BIG one is
how to get the grid lines on the image. These would have to be driven
digitally given they are etched in to the glass. So not sure how to do
that part yet but I think an Arduino has 1024 value ADC full scale.
Then of course can we get it through a calibration process to aline
everything. We would need about 60FPS at a res of 1024x768 monochrome
with and adjustable persistence as a possible feature upgrade to aid
in the matching of transistors. By REALLY being able to over lay the
traces. But I really like the idea of a 576 with a 19 inch screen.

On 1/6/2020 6:40 PM, Mlynch001 wrote:
Seems like they are getting a premium for their interface.  But they
are also the only game in town.  If you want to play, I suppose one
should prepare to pay dearly?  I wish some of the brilliant minds in
the group would come up with something reasonable.  Arduino or
Raspberry Pi seem to have potential, I am not at all familiar with
either.




Matthew Hofmann
 

I assume that the 576 Curve Tracer doesn't have a USB interface and this guy has somehow added one? Any idea how/where he tapped off of the 576 to digitize the data on the CRT?

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of garp66
Sent: Monday, January 06, 2020 5:11 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tek 576 Curve Tracer USB port to a cpu ... ?

hi,

Has anyone thought of interfacing a Tek 576 Curve Tracer (Or any of the other Tek Curve Tracers) to a laptop via USB ?

I have been thinking of putting an Arduino or Rasp Pi inside a Tek 576, with a few A/D & D I/O shields to get the data out for comparisons and automated measurements.

I just saw this YouTube Demo of a "pricy" USB conversion :
(dated Jan 30, 2019)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSMqD5iwj4U

done by Tuntien of
https://equiptek.com/000.htm

rick


Mlynch001
 

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 02:29 PM, Matthew Hofmann wrote:


I assume that the 576 Curve Tracer doesn't have a USB interface and this guy
has somehow added one? Any idea how/where he tapped off of the 576 to
digitize the data on the CRT?
Matt,

Correct, No USB or other ports on the 576. It is from an age before USB was even a dream. There is a person who has accomplished this, yes. Where and How they tap in to get the data??? That is the $1 Million question, one we would like to discover the answer to. There must be some way to do it, but the cost of a commercial solution is steep. It is going to take some deep knowledge of the 576 and whatever method provides the interface. Some have suggested Arduino?
--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


Matthew Hofmann
 

I have an old 575 like the one your brother has. I think I might do a little exploration into the circuitry to see how one might drive a pair of A/D converters to get the horiz & vert data.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Mlynch001
Sent: Tuesday, January 07, 2020 3:46 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 576 Curve Tracer USB port to a cpu ... ?

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 02:29 PM, Matthew Hofmann wrote:


I assume that the 576 Curve Tracer doesn't have a USB interface and this guy
has somehow added one? Any idea how/where he tapped off of the 576 to
digitize the data on the CRT?
Matt,

Correct, No USB or other ports on the 576. It is from an age before USB was even a dream. There is a person who has accomplished this, yes. Where and How they tap in to get the data??? That is the $1 Million question, one we would like to discover the answer to. There must be some way to do it, but the cost of a commercial solution is steep. It is going to take some deep knowledge of the 576 and whatever method provides the interface. Some have suggested Arduino?
--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


peter bunge
 

Getting the data digitized is the easy part. Can someone write the software
interface between the USB and the computer screen?
Arduinos and PICs probably have USB driver functions, its the graphics that
is the problem for me. I wish I had the skills.
I use a camera but the shutter speed needs to be long enough to avoid
bright patches of trace.
Tektronix at one time produced a digital camera to replace the Polaroid
ones but they went obsolete as fast as computers.

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 4:29 PM Matthew Hofmann <mhofmann@...>
wrote:

I have an old 575 like the one your brother has. I think I might do a
little exploration into the circuitry to see how one might drive a pair of
A/D converters to get the horiz & vert data.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Mlynch001
Sent: Tuesday, January 07, 2020 3:46 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 576 Curve Tracer USB port to a cpu ... ?

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 02:29 PM, Matthew Hofmann wrote:


I assume that the 576 Curve Tracer doesn't have a USB interface and this
guy
has somehow added one? Any idea how/where he tapped off of the 576 to
digitize the data on the CRT?
Matt,

Correct, No USB or other ports on the 576. It is from an age before USB
was even a dream. There is a person who has accomplished this, yes. Where
and How they tap in to get the data??? That is the $1 Million question,
one we would like to discover the answer to. There must be some way to do
it, but the cost of a commercial solution is steep. It is going to take
some deep knowledge of the 576 and whatever method provides the interface.
Some have suggested Arduino?
--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR







Eric
 

Arduinos can dump serial stream data direct in to a pc the micro can handle
all the pc interconnect as well.

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020, 5:05 PM peter bunge <bunge.pjp@...> wrote:

Getting the data digitized is the easy part. Can someone write the software
interface between the USB and the computer screen?
Arduinos and PICs probably have USB driver functions, its the graphics that
is the problem for me. I wish I had the skills.
I use a camera but the shutter speed needs to be long enough to avoid
bright patches of trace.
Tektronix at one time produced a digital camera to replace the Polaroid
ones but they went obsolete as fast as computers.

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 4:29 PM Matthew Hofmann <mhofmann@...>
wrote:

I have an old 575 like the one your brother has. I think I might do a
little exploration into the circuitry to see how one might drive a pair
of
A/D converters to get the horiz & vert data.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Mlynch001
Sent: Tuesday, January 07, 2020 3:46 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 576 Curve Tracer USB port to a cpu ... ?

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 02:29 PM, Matthew Hofmann wrote:


I assume that the 576 Curve Tracer doesn't have a USB interface and
this
guy
has somehow added one? Any idea how/where he tapped off of the 576 to
digitize the data on the CRT?
Matt,

Correct, No USB or other ports on the 576. It is from an age before USB
was even a dream. There is a person who has accomplished this, yes.
Where
and How they tap in to get the data??? That is the $1 Million question,
one we would like to discover the answer to. There must be some way to
do
it, but the cost of a commercial solution is steep. It is going to take
some deep knowledge of the 576 and whatever method provides the
interface.
Some have suggested Arduino?
--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR









Mlynch001
 

The big advantage of the 576 is that it is solid state and the logic is TTL, so it may be easier to work directly with the ARDUINO than it might prove with the 575, just taking a guess on that . The one interface that I have seen not only exports the CRT Traces, but also the knob positions and voltages as well (on the 576 at least). The fact that the 576 contains that wonderful and complex readout card, might actually make the job easier to interface. I would be interested in such a project. I have a few ARDUINO boards lying around, looking for something to do. I think the ARDUINO code would be the hardest part, but what do I know.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


Ke-Fong Lin
 

I find it very surprising that the 576 doesn't have an X-Y output for a plotter.
These were common in the 60s-70s and I guess even in the 80s, before GPIB became common place.
For instance, my HP3580A spectrum analyzer has a 0-5V X-Y output with the related pen on-off outputs.
So you can have a nice spectrum plot on paper!
Maybe that's because Tek doesn't have a plotter offering (contrary to HP).
And there are various add-on to take photos of scope's screen.


Harvey White
 

You don't really need to worry a lot about it.

Use the arduino serial write to get the data to the PC.

Then in whatever program you use, be it pascal, visual basic, or what, open a com port for the data

You'll then get a data stream of what you've written.  I'd recommend ascii of the form

X= nnnn.nnnn; Y=nnnn.nnnn;

C has parse routines, other languages might.  There may be some nice tutorials out there.

For graphics, you can use things like write line, and then set pixel (mythical functions, depends on the language).

Short story is that it is possible to do.

Graphics are fairly easy once you see that you can write text anywhere on the screen, draw a line from point A to point B, and then plot a point (or draw a line from point A to B, depending on style).

The reason for doing it yourself is that you'll learn a lot, and that you can customize it to do exactly what you want.


Harvey

On 1/7/2020 5:05 PM, peter bunge wrote:
Getting the data digitized is the easy part. Can someone write the software
interface between the USB and the computer screen?
Arduinos and PICs probably have USB driver functions, its the graphics that
is the problem for me. I wish I had the skills.
I use a camera but the shutter speed needs to be long enough to avoid
bright patches of trace.
Tektronix at one time produced a digital camera to replace the Polaroid
ones but they went obsolete as fast as computers.

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 4:29 PM Matthew Hofmann <mhofmann@...>
wrote:

I have an old 575 like the one your brother has. I think I might do a
little exploration into the circuitry to see how one might drive a pair of
A/D converters to get the horiz & vert data.

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Mlynch001
Sent: Tuesday, January 07, 2020 3:46 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 576 Curve Tracer USB port to a cpu ... ?

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 02:29 PM, Matthew Hofmann wrote:

I assume that the 576 Curve Tracer doesn't have a USB interface and this
guy
has somehow added one? Any idea how/where he tapped off of the 576 to
digitize the data on the CRT?
Matt,

Correct, No USB or other ports on the 576. It is from an age before USB
was even a dream. There is a person who has accomplished this, yes. Where
and How they tap in to get the data??? That is the $1 Million question,
one we would like to discover the answer to. There must be some way to do
it, but the cost of a commercial solution is steep. It is going to take
some deep knowledge of the 576 and whatever method provides the interface.
Some have suggested Arduino?
--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR







Mlynch001
 

On Tue, Jan 7, 2020 at 04:40 PM, Ke-Fong Lin wrote:


I find it very surprising that the 576 doesn't have an X-Y output for a
plotter.
Maybe that's because Tek doesn't have a plotter offering (contrary to HP).
And there are various add-on to take photos of scope's screen.
Lin,

Would it not be a simple matter to somehow convert the 576 deflection plate voltage signals to X-Y Data? Just thinking out loud here.

I would guess that you are 100% correct in your thinking about the lack of a TEKTRONIX plotter. Not much motivation to put an X-Y output and then give your customer a motivation to buy an HP or other brand of plotter? On the other hand, TEKTRONIX was pushing Scope Cameras, big time. They had considerable experience with scope cameras, so it was natural that they went that direction.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


JJ
 

I think the voltages need to be picked off before they get to the
deflection plates. If you digitize the signals and send them across the
serial interface using an Arduino, all you need to do on the PC side is to
plot the stored samples of each voltage against each other - Ic is
essentially derived from a voltage across a 1 ohm resistor. You can use the
Matlib library to plot. the samples against each other - Ic vs Ib, Ic vs
Vce, etc. I don't think that you need access to any of the 576 controls
since the samples themselves get scaled automatically and dynamically by
Matlib when plotting.

I just finished writing a program using Python /PYQT5 to drill holes in a
PCB using an inexpensive GRBL based CNC machine - 3018 Pro (I paid $170).
GRBL based CNCs all use Arduinos. The program uses an affine matrix
transformation - so you don't need to line up the PCB to drill the holes
after etching.

I don't believe that it's all that difficult to do!

Best,
John Justin


Jim Ford
 

Hi, John.With your experience writing Python code, maybe you could point me in the right direction.  I'm trying to learn Python so I can control my test equipment over GPIB and USB.  I downloaded a Python tutorial, but it was more like an overview and told me way more than I wanted to know and none of what I needed to know!  Maybe good for a software engineer but useless for a hardware guy like me.I was going to private message you but then I figured that others on TekScopes could benefit as well.Thanks in advance for your help.Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: JJ <jajustin@...> Date: 1/7/20 3:22 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tek 576 Curve Tracer USB port to a cpu ... ? I think the voltages need to be picked off before they get to thedeflection plates. If you digitize the signals and send them across theserial interface using an Arduino, all you need to do on the PC side is toplot the stored samples of each voltage against each other - Ic isessentially derived from a voltage across a 1 ohm resistor. You can use theMatlib library to plot. the samples against each other - Ic vs Ib, Ic vsVce, etc. I don't think that you need access to any of the 576 controlssince the samples themselves get scaled automatically and dynamically byMatlib when plotting.I just finished writing a program using Python /PYQT5 to drill holes in aPCB using an inexpensive GRBL based CNC machine - 3018 Pro (I paid $170).GRBL based CNCs all use Arduinos. The program uses an affine matrixtransformation - so you don't need to line up the PCB to drill the holesafter etching.I don't believe that it's all that difficult to do!Best,John Justin


 

Hi Rick,
Thanks for pointing out this video. It is interesting for many reasons.
* How many people would tack on an additional $2,000 on top of $2,000 that this company sells a used 576 for. There is
* It is a very amateurish demonstration of something they want a lot of money for. The You Tube demo and an asking price of ~$2,000 are very inconsistent.
* At one point in the video he unplugs a USB cable but you can't see what it is being unplugged from. They appear to be very careful to not show the "black box" the USB cable plugs into that would be the hardware interface between the 576 and the Windows program.
* Does the "black box" have to be connected to points inside the 576?
* I went to their web site. They sell used electronic equipment like, among other things 576 curve tracers. I could not find anywhere on their site where I could learn more about it.

It would be possible to capture some of the information without opening the 576 up and connecting to points inside it. An A/D connected between the emitter and collector would capture the voltage being applied between those two terminals. The current steps flowing through the base are harder to digitize unless you insert a small resistor in the base current generator to measure them.

The A/D attached to the collector lead would have to handle a huge voltage range. I'm not sure how you would do that except by the user manually selecting what the range would be in advance so a resistive divider of the right attenuation could be inserted between the 576 and the A/D inside their interface box. The same would be true for the base current. You would have to specify what the step range is going to be so the gain of the trans-impedance amplifier (or whatever they use) to drive the base current A/D could be set to a range it could handle.

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of garp66
Sent: Monday, January 06, 2020 2:11 PM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tek 576 Curve Tracer USB port to a cpu ... ?

hi,

Has anyone thought of interfacing a Tek 576 Curve Tracer (Or any of the other Tek Curve Tracers) to a laptop via USB ?

I have been thinking of putting an Arduino or Rasp Pi inside a Tek 576, with a few A/D & D I/O shields to get the data out for comparisons and automated measurements.

I just saw this YouTube Demo of a "pricy" USB conversion :
(dated Jan 30, 2019)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSMqD5iwj4U

done by Tuntien of
https://equiptek.com/000.htm

rick







--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Paul Amaranth
 

I've thought of making an LCD replacement for the 576 CRT. It would be
pretty neat, you could add a touch screen interface and calculate the
parameters on the fly (quite possible since you could get all of the
control settings as well as the X/Y data available). USB for data
download would be useful. I have a 576 with a double peaking CRT so
I'll probably get around toit one of these days.

I do development with arduinos and they are pretty amazing.
I don't think I'd use it for this though, the code space is
not that huge and it would be very easy to fill it up.
Maybe you could do it, but that doesn't fit my idea of
proper software. The finite state machine you have to use
for anything of complexity tends to get out of hand in
order to use the event loop paradigm embedded in them.

A multi threaded application would probably be a better
architecture.

I also do not like the idea of having to use a PC for data
display. Software programs like that have a tendency to
wander away from the instrument. An since developers always
use the latest/neatest/etc package to build the UI it becomes
impossible to build after a few revisions down the road (IF
code is available - try building some of the Non-GNU SDR
software if you don't believe me). I've lost track of the
number of revisions of Qt I've had to use for various
packages.

It took me months to track down the TekMate software that interfaced
to the 24xx scopes.

My two cents.
Paul

--
Paul Amaranth, GCIH | Manchester MI, USA
Aurora Group of Michigan, LLC | Security, Systems & Software
paul@... | Unix & Windows