Topics

100 Tek Photos

Vince Vielhaber
 

That's why a packing slip inside the box is important. Some of the fedex pouches (that thin clear envelope you stick on the package with the label inside) will rip open when slid across the floor of a truck and the label comes out. I had that happen to some of my outgoing packages a while back. Since then I've put a couple of strips of packing tape across the face of the pouch. With the packing slip or invoice inside, or at least a card with your address on it, the package will find its way back to you if not to the recipient.

Vince.

On 09/12/2019 02:40 AM, nonIonizing EMF wrote:
On Wed, Sep 11, 2019 at 09:53 PM, Mlynch001 wrote:


Fed Ex and UPS can destroy the best packed and most indestructible instruments
made.
I just recently experienced my first lost in transit package with FedEx. Made it to Memphis TN and who know's? My guess was stolen like the other missing packages I've experienced before.

Jason A.
 

Dave,

I believe in there being more value in quality engineering, construction and materials than the latest whiz-bang blinking lights on things. I am going to completely wander off-topic, for a moment, but trust me - I'll bring it back. This is just to illustrate a point. (For context, I'm near 50 years old and am leaving it at that. :-P )

Think about your average washing machine from before, say the mid 1990s. Or refrigerators, TVs or many other items we used to take for granted that they would last for years. Now we have appliances - things that used to be called durable goods - that last maybe 7 years and end up in a landfill. I have to ask - which is worse for the environment? Having to wash your clothes twice in a new machine that doesn't get things as clean as a well designed one from the past that would get it done in one wash, but used a little more electricity and water; plus 3-4 of the new fangled ones ending up in the landfill compared to the life of an older one? How long do these LCD TVs last nowadays compared to the old Zeniths, RCAs, Sylvanias, etc.?

Back to the point about Tektronix - as the mind-set of the world went away from designing quality equipment that stands the test of time to the notion of "everything has the shelf life of a banana," unfortunately a company culture built on the principles of design, quality and workmanship is going to struggle in the planned obsolescence / disposable world. It is an ongoing struggle for Tektronix, IBM, General Electric, Altec Lansing, Western Electric, RCA, Maytag and countless other companies in the United States, Germany and other nations known for the products they (once?) produced. Many of these companies are shadows of their former selves because the world has become distracted by "the new thing of the week," and has largely given up on quality.

So to your point Dave, in this day and age of a disposable TV that you purchased for $99 on sale that would cost more to repair than pitching it in the landfill and getting a new one, how much test equipment do the technicians even need? And another question that raises.. how many technicians even are there anymore? How many millennials out there would know how to so much as change a tire, fix an outlet or light-switch in their home, replace a bulging motor-run cap on their air conditioner or the like? But they can sure set up Wifi and ask Alexa to do their shopping.

The worst part of it to me is that we get extra features that don't matter and with it, planned obsolescence.

This is why this group is valuable - It is not just for pure nostalgia that we are enthusiasts for this equipment. Today so much of it is as viable as modern equipment (if maybe not as convenient in some regards and certainly not as energy efficient) for so many tasks today, and in many cases superior to a lot of modern equipment depending on the task. This is a testimony to the minds, vision, effort, and pride the folks who started and made Tektronix Tektronix.

Seeing where and to some extent how they built these products in pictures was a treat!

Best regards,

Jason

Mlynch001
 

Chuck,

Thank you! There is rarely one of your posts from which I do not gain an insight on a wide range of subjects.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR

Jason A.
 

Amen to your rule, Dave! I have had very similar experiences in my life as well.

ArtekManuals
 

Been there .... done that . At the age of 55 my father built his last boat of many...(a 50' fero-cement (concrete) Ketch). The diesel auxiliary engine for it was a scavenged one that purportedly started life   as the engine from a double decker tour bus.  By the time I was 12 I had my own TV repair business and for the next 25 years my father never owned a TV ( or computer) that wasn't a trash rescue that I resurrected for him. At age 65 his VCR died it took him 6 months of checking out books at the public library but he finally fixed it by himself ( he was a structural engineer ....not a EE). RIP Dad,  he passed away last year at 98 . I am 72 and have only owned one new car car in my life. The truck I had before the one I have now went 215,000 miles before I sold it too a friend of mine for $500 and 1/4 of a deer 8^) .....You get the idea 8^)

And the current generation looks at us like we are nuts when we raise our eyebrows when they buy EVERYTHING on installment ...sigh

Dave
manuals@...

On 9/13/2019 9:58 AM, Chuck Harris wrote:
This is possibly getting out of hand. I didn't say anything
was wrong with tek building things on the cheap, I made an
observation that tek built their office furniture on the cheap.

I happen to recognize what they did, because I was raised in
that Great Depression mentality. As I said, I was 7 or 8 before
I sat, ate, studied, played, or ??? on/in something that wasn't
built by hand, by my dad. My dad even built our TV (not a
heathkit), the violin he played, and fixed and repaired the cars
he drove, and the watches he wore. We even built our own camp,
and I helped clear the trees, dig the well, and I dug the
outhouse. And my mom was the flip side of the coin... she made
my meals, clothes, costumes, tents, rucksacks, the pictures that
hung on the walls, root beer, bread, butter, mayonnaise, peanut
butter, and magically turned butter back into cream....

It has everything to do with why I am the way that I am.

The reason this observation was interesting to me is it was
proof positive that tektronix believed that if it wasn't done
by tektronix people, it was bad for some reason.... if it fits
my pattern, usually that reason was economics.

Look at how the company naturally vertically integrated itself:
They made scopes, crt's, terminal boards, hybrids, IC's, sockets,
transformers, capacitors, resistors, nuts and bolts, cabinets
on scopes, plastic injection molding, cam switches, shafts, ...
all the way down to manuals, binding, desks, carrels (cubicals),
calendars, ... and as we learned lately, even shipping peanuts....

And look at their catalog. Ever wonder why they did such a
diverse, and somewhat quirky selection of instruments? Think
about self need: Make CRT's need light meters to test beam
intensity. Make manuals, need printers to print manuals, plotters
to plot schematics... Make PCB's, IC's and hybrids, need graphics,
layout equipment, bed of nails, signature analysis, data collection,
wire bonders, and automated probing stations...

Ultimately, what breaks such a company's back, is the same thing
that broke mine: you can't be good at everything, and still compete
economically.

A lot of tektronix's special talents looked cheap to do, when
you were raised up in that Great Depression mindset, but cost the
company its soul, when the US government was no longer there to
foot the bill.

I admire tek greatly for what they did, but still, in my heart of
hearts, I am super glad that I was too afraid of rejection to apply
there after college. They would have hired me, and I would have
fit right in.

-Chuck Harris


Dave Seiter wrote:
I don't think there is anything wrong "building things on the cheap" as long as they work and are safe. I've seen so many offices where they spent stupid sums of money on furnishings to impress people. That sort of thing doesn't impress me- I think it's wasteful.
I worked at a company back in about 2002 that actually hired someone to research and purchase new chairs for everyone. And not just a few hours- they were around for a few months! A few months after that the layoffs started, and in the end all the physical assets, IP and one employee moved out of state to the new owners location. They had been around since '83, but got caught up ( in my opinion) in the dotcom orgy of excess and poor management.
I have a rule: when the company you work for decides to build a new headquarters for no logical reason, start job hunting because the end is near (three times in my case).
-Dave
On Thursday, September 12, 2019, 08:03:19 AM PDT, Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:
Interesting how much of the office furniture, warehouse
equipment, benches, workspaces, etc, were tek built on
the cheap. Pegboard and 2x2 built office carrels...

Not meaning to be disparaging, but it looks like the stuff
my depression raised farm boy father used to make out of
wooden peach crates and pallets found around the back of
the supermarket... in other words, like my early childhood.

[I was 7 or 8 before I first sat, slept, ate, studied, or
played on anything my father didn't make by hand from
discarded materials, after work.... but I digress.]

It must have been a noisy, dusty, demoralizing environment for
the blue collar workers. And yet, they did some amazing work.

Probably the perfect distance from Washington, DC to get some
work done without interferrence.

-Chuck Harris

Kurt Rosenfeld wrote:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1YoJB_t2OX3jd6xqaJcXolzmO09kzH8zU

I didn't take the photos and don't know anything about them. All I did is scan them. Enjoy.







--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com

Chuck Harris
 

This is possibly getting out of hand. I didn't say anything
was wrong with tek building things on the cheap, I made an
observation that tek built their office furniture on the cheap.

I happen to recognize what they did, because I was raised in
that Great Depression mentality. As I said, I was 7 or 8 before
I sat, ate, studied, played, or ??? on/in something that wasn't
built by hand, by my dad. My dad even built our TV (not a
heathkit), the violin he played, and fixed and repaired the cars
he drove, and the watches he wore. We even built our own camp,
and I helped clear the trees, dig the well, and I dug the
outhouse. And my mom was the flip side of the coin... she made
my meals, clothes, costumes, tents, rucksacks, the pictures that
hung on the walls, root beer, bread, butter, mayonnaise, peanut
butter, and magically turned butter back into cream....

It has everything to do with why I am the way that I am.

The reason this observation was interesting to me is it was
proof positive that tektronix believed that if it wasn't done
by tektronix people, it was bad for some reason.... if it fits
my pattern, usually that reason was economics.

Look at how the company naturally vertically integrated itself:
They made scopes, crt's, terminal boards, hybrids, IC's, sockets,
transformers, capacitors, resistors, nuts and bolts, cabinets
on scopes, plastic injection molding, cam switches, shafts, ...
all the way down to manuals, binding, desks, carrels (cubicals),
calendars, ... and as we learned lately, even shipping peanuts....

And look at their catalog. Ever wonder why they did such a
diverse, and somewhat quirky selection of instruments? Think
about self need: Make CRT's need light meters to test beam
intensity. Make manuals, need printers to print manuals, plotters
to plot schematics... Make PCB's, IC's and hybrids, need graphics,
layout equipment, bed of nails, signature analysis, data collection,
wire bonders, and automated probing stations...

Ultimately, what breaks such a company's back, is the same thing
that broke mine: you can't be good at everything, and still compete
economically.

A lot of tektronix's special talents looked cheap to do, when
you were raised up in that Great Depression mindset, but cost the
company its soul, when the US government was no longer there to
foot the bill.

I admire tek greatly for what they did, but still, in my heart of
hearts, I am super glad that I was too afraid of rejection to apply
there after college. They would have hired me, and I would have
fit right in.

-Chuck Harris


Dave Seiter wrote:

I don't think there is anything wrong "building things on the cheap" as long as they work and are safe. I've seen so many offices where they spent stupid sums of money on furnishings to impress people. That sort of thing doesn't impress me- I think it's wasteful.
I worked at a company back in about 2002 that actually hired someone to research and purchase new chairs for everyone. And not just a few hours- they were around for a few months! A few months after that the layoffs started, and in the end all the physical assets, IP and one employee moved out of state to the new owners location. They had been around since '83, but got caught up ( in my opinion) in the dotcom orgy of excess and poor management.
I have a rule: when the company you work for decides to build a new headquarters for no logical reason, start job hunting because the end is near (three times in my case).
-Dave
On Thursday, September 12, 2019, 08:03:19 AM PDT, Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

Interesting how much of the office furniture, warehouse
equipment, benches, workspaces, etc, were tek built on
the cheap. Pegboard and 2x2 built office carrels...

Not meaning to be disparaging, but it looks like the stuff
my depression raised farm boy father used to make out of
wooden peach crates and pallets found around the back of
the supermarket... in other words, like my early childhood.

[I was 7 or 8 before I first sat, slept, ate, studied, or
played on anything my father didn't make by hand from
discarded materials, after work.... but I digress.]

It must have been a noisy, dusty, demoralizing environment for
the blue collar workers. And yet, they did some amazing work.

Probably the perfect distance from Washington, DC to get some
work done without interferrence.

-Chuck Harris

Kurt Rosenfeld wrote:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1YoJB_t2OX3jd6xqaJcXolzmO09kzH8zU

I didn't take the photos and don't know anything about them. All I did is scan them. Enjoy.








Dave Seiter
 

I don't think there is anything wrong "building things on the cheap" as long as they work and are safe.  I've seen so many offices where they spent stupid sums of money on furnishings to impress people.  That sort of thing doesn't impress me- I think it's wasteful.
I worked at a company back in about 2002 that actually hired someone to research and purchase new chairs for everyone.  And not just a few hours- they were around for a few months!  A few months after that the layoffs started, and in the end all the physical assets, IP and one employee moved out of state to the new owners location.  They had been around since '83, but got caught up ( in my opinion) in the dotcom orgy of excess and poor management. 
I have a rule: when the company you work for decides to build a new headquarters for no logical reason, start job hunting because the end is near (three times in my case).
-Dave

On Thursday, September 12, 2019, 08:03:19 AM PDT, Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

Interesting how much of the office furniture, warehouse
equipment, benches, workspaces, etc, were tek built on
the cheap.  Pegboard and 2x2 built office carrels...

Not meaning to be disparaging, but it looks like the stuff
my depression raised farm boy father used to make out of
wooden peach crates and pallets found around the back of
the supermarket... in other words, like my early childhood.

[I was 7 or 8 before I first sat, slept, ate, studied, or
played on anything my father didn't make by hand from
discarded materials, after work.... but I digress.]

It must have been a noisy, dusty, demoralizing environment for
the blue collar workers.  And yet, they did some amazing work.

Probably the perfect distance from Washington, DC to get some
work done without interferrence.

-Chuck Harris

Kurt Rosenfeld wrote:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1YoJB_t2OX3jd6xqaJcXolzmO09kzH8zU

I didn't take the photos and don't know anything about them. All I did is scan them. Enjoy.



hardyhansendk
 

Me too !
Hardy Hansen

-----Oprindelig meddelelse-----
Fra: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] På vegne af Chuck Harris
Sendt: 13. september 2019 05:42
Til: TekScopes@groups.io
Emne: Re: [TekScopes] 100 Tek Photos

I don't know about the others, but I would like to hear your
story.

-Chuck Harris

Ed Breya via Groups.Io wrote:
Chuck wrote:
"As would I... particularly those that wound transformers. But thus
far, I think the only tek alumni we have heard from are sales,
marketing, and engineering, with engineering being the majority.
I believe we also have several members who worked for tek as
technicians at some point in their careers.

Anyone who worked in other areas at tek, please raise your hand!"

OK - my hand is up. I normally wouldn't get into these kinds of discussions, but it seems to be going off on some tangents. It's fun to reminisce about the good (or bad) old days sometimes, but let's not get too carried away. I can't readily view these pictures on my old computers, so I'm not sure what they are about, or what eras or locations they portray (but I bet I've seen them before - see below). One thing I can say though, even without looking, is that the Tek of "my" era was not at all a sweat shop, in any department (I saw them all at one time or another). And, most people I met there were happy, until the big downturns that began in the late 80s through 90s.

I was there from 78 to 95. I started in TM500/5000 engineering at Walker Rd, then scopes in Bldg 47, then all sorts of various side deals, and stints in the legal dept, business development (Bldg 50), and corporate finance in Wilsonville, where I sat about ten cubes away from the CEO.

The standard cubicle for technical work was the steel desk (or two) surrounded by pegboard walls. Same in manufacturing. In areas that were for office work like marketing, finance, and administration, they were pretty much the same except fabric covered walls with nicer trim. Same in the corporate offices atop Bldg 50 - I spent a lot of time there. The "fanciness" of any environment depended mostly on when it was installed - the newer stuff was usually a lot nicer. The administrative and executive offices tended to be a little more spacious and laid out for business meetings, with nice conference rooms. Some offices were enclosed, but still not all that fancy, like you'd see in movies. The legal dept had a nice law library, and huge amounts of document storage - we're talking pieces of paper here - millions of pages. I estimate that I reviewed over a hundred thousand of them during my work there.

Wilsonville was among the newer buildings, and corporate offices were eventually relocated there. It was newer and nicer, but nothing outrageous.

Anyway, I hope this helps to dispel notions of sweat-shop-ness or extravagance - the opposed poles of work environment. I can't speak to how it was before or after my time, but doubt it was much different.

BTW, speaking of pictures of Tek's history, I have probably seen more of them than anyone else on earth - no exaggeration - but it was associated with sad times at Tek, during business un-development. If enough people are interested, I can relate a short version of the story.

Ed



---
Denne mail er kontrolleret for vira af AVG.
http://www.avg.com

Chuck Harris
 

I don't know about the others, but I would like to hear your
story.

-Chuck Harris

Ed Breya via Groups.Io wrote:

Chuck wrote:
"As would I... particularly those that wound transformers. But thus
far, I think the only tek alumni we have heard from are sales,
marketing, and engineering, with engineering being the majority.
I believe we also have several members who worked for tek as
technicians at some point in their careers.

Anyone who worked in other areas at tek, please raise your hand!"

OK - my hand is up. I normally wouldn't get into these kinds of discussions, but it seems to be going off on some tangents. It's fun to reminisce about the good (or bad) old days sometimes, but let's not get too carried away. I can't readily view these pictures on my old computers, so I'm not sure what they are about, or what eras or locations they portray (but I bet I've seen them before - see below). One thing I can say though, even without looking, is that the Tek of "my" era was not at all a sweat shop, in any department (I saw them all at one time or another). And, most people I met there were happy, until the big downturns that began in the late 80s through 90s.

I was there from 78 to 95. I started in TM500/5000 engineering at Walker Rd, then scopes in Bldg 47, then all sorts of various side deals, and stints in the legal dept, business development (Bldg 50), and corporate finance in Wilsonville, where I sat about ten cubes away from the CEO.

The standard cubicle for technical work was the steel desk (or two) surrounded by pegboard walls. Same in manufacturing. In areas that were for office work like marketing, finance, and administration, they were pretty much the same except fabric covered walls with nicer trim. Same in the corporate offices atop Bldg 50 - I spent a lot of time there. The "fanciness" of any environment depended mostly on when it was installed - the newer stuff was usually a lot nicer. The administrative and executive offices tended to be a little more spacious and laid out for business meetings, with nice conference rooms. Some offices were enclosed, but still not all that fancy, like you'd see in movies. The legal dept had a nice law library, and huge amounts of document storage - we're talking pieces of paper here - millions of pages. I estimate that I reviewed over a hundred thousand of them during my work there.

Wilsonville was among the newer buildings, and corporate offices were eventually relocated there. It was newer and nicer, but nothing outrageous.

Anyway, I hope this helps to dispel notions of sweat-shop-ness or extravagance - the opposed poles of work environment. I can't speak to how it was before or after my time, but doubt it was much different.

BTW, speaking of pictures of Tek's history, I have probably seen more of them than anyone else on earth - no exaggeration - but it was associated with sad times at Tek, during business un-development. If enough people are interested, I can relate a short version of the story.

Ed

teamlarryohio
 

I was in the Dayton Service Center from 75-86, was out to the campus 3
times. The environment was fine, until it disappeared in April of 86 with
much of the rest of the field organization.
-ls-

Ed Breya
 

Chuck wrote:
"As would I... particularly those that wound transformers. But thus
far, I think the only tek alumni we have heard from are sales,
marketing, and engineering, with engineering being the majority.
I believe we also have several members who worked for tek as
technicians at some point in their careers.

Anyone who worked in other areas at tek, please raise your hand!"

OK - my hand is up. I normally wouldn't get into these kinds of discussions, but it seems to be going off on some tangents. It's fun to reminisce about the good (or bad) old days sometimes, but let's not get too carried away. I can't readily view these pictures on my old computers, so I'm not sure what they are about, or what eras or locations they portray (but I bet I've seen them before - see below). One thing I can say though, even without looking, is that the Tek of "my" era was not at all a sweat shop, in any department (I saw them all at one time or another). And, most people I met there were happy, until the big downturns that began in the late 80s through 90s.

I was there from 78 to 95. I started in TM500/5000 engineering at Walker Rd, then scopes in Bldg 47, then all sorts of various side deals, and stints in the legal dept, business development (Bldg 50), and corporate finance in Wilsonville, where I sat about ten cubes away from the CEO.

The standard cubicle for technical work was the steel desk (or two) surrounded by pegboard walls. Same in manufacturing. In areas that were for office work like marketing, finance, and administration, they were pretty much the same except fabric covered walls with nicer trim. Same in the corporate offices atop Bldg 50 - I spent a lot of time there. The "fanciness" of any environment depended mostly on when it was installed - the newer stuff was usually a lot nicer. The administrative and executive offices tended to be a little more spacious and laid out for business meetings, with nice conference rooms. Some offices were enclosed, but still not all that fancy, like you'd see in movies. The legal dept had a nice law library, and huge amounts of document storage - we're talking pieces of paper here - millions of pages. I estimate that I reviewed over a hundred thousand of them during my work there.

Wilsonville was among the newer buildings, and corporate offices were eventually relocated there. It was newer and nicer, but nothing outrageous.

Anyway, I hope this helps to dispel notions of sweat-shop-ness or extravagance - the opposed poles of work environment. I can't speak to how it was before or after my time, but doubt it was much different.

BTW, speaking of pictures of Tek's history, I have probably seen more of them than anyone else on earth - no exaggeration - but it was associated with sad times at Tek, during business un-development. If enough people are interested, I can relate a short version of the story.

Ed

Chuck Harris
 

As would I... particularly those that wound transformers. But thus
far, I think the only tek alumni we have heard from are sales,
marketing, and engineering, with engineering being the majority.

I believe we also have several members who worked for tek as
technicians at some point in their careers.

Anyone who worked in other areas at tek, please raise your hand!

-Chuck Harris



Mlynch001 wrote:

Chuck,

Excellent point! Context is everything. "The winners are the ones who write the history." One needs to consider that in the early days, they were very successful, then as corporatism became the norm, the TEK success story faded. I would love to hear more about Jill, Jane, Frank and Joe. This would be a very interesting and perhaps quite a different story.

Mlynch001
 

Chuck,

Excellent point! Context is everything. "The winners are the ones who write the history." One needs to consider that in the early days, they were very successful, then as corporatism became the norm, the TEK success story faded. I would love to hear more about Jill, Jane, Frank and Joe. This would be a very interesting and perhaps quite a different story.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR

Mlynch001
 

Interesting insight. Context in wages is everything. It was exactly why TEK was founded in Beaverton years before the "silicon valley" came into being, the cost of doing business. I would imagine that at the time, TEK paid better than average wages in the Beaverton area. And I am equally sure that, compared to SF in that same time, those wages may have seemed low. One must recall that Oregon and Washington state offered almost nothing industrially before WWII, therefore people who came out of agriculture, fishing or the timber industry could go to work at TEK, learn a skill or a trade (including electronic design and engineering), make far better wages (relative to the local average), work fewer hours and in a much safer environment. The cost of living in that area was still very low, so their money went much farther.
I just don't recall reading that those employees felt that the pay was that bad (perhaps, they did?). In addition, I don't think that money has everything to do with the subject. I found that people will stay at a place where they were recognized and treated with respect, in spite of less money in "wages". Conversely, people will NOT stay at a place where either the corporate culture or local cost of living is so oppressive or stifling that large salaries or high wages alone cannot make it palatable. The experience gained at TEK certainly was obviously a large part of the reason for people working there and continuing to do so, in spite of less money? If anything, your observations make the TEK story even more amazing, since these people were obviously motivated by something other than higher wages. There is a higher calling for many people, besides money.
Working at a corporate hell hole (I have done it) would require more than "average" compensation (at least for me). As of today, what many people across the USA today make in wages, would qualify for homeless benefits in SF (perhaps why SF now has one of the highest homeless populations in the nation?). One certainly cannot compare the cost of living in the SF Bay area to almost anywhere else in the nation. It is certainly one of the top 5 most expensive cities to live in the USA. Back in that time frame, a "living wage" in Beaverton was likely just as different from a "living wage" in SF; as it remains today. For many people living in the SF Bay area, it is impossible to imagine themselves living there on any wage that is paid elsewhere, since the cost of living was and remains extremely high. People choose to live other places specifically because the cost in many areas (including SF) is so high and the advantages (for those individuals) are so few.

More thoughts and opinions

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR

Chuck Harris
 

I have done excellent work in environments like that, in
spite of the environment. Often having to work late into
the night just so I could concentrate without the din and
constant interruption of the machines and other workers.

But, although it was economical for my employer, it cost
me dearly.

OBTW, when reading the accounts of tektronix excellence,
try to figure out who wrote them. Hint: It wasn't Jane
on the assembly line, Jill in one of those carrels in the
rework area, May in the typing pool, Frank in the warehouse,
or Joe running the lathe and punch press...

-Chuck Harris


Mlynch001 wrote:

Chuck,

I don't think those observations are at all disparaging, they simply are evidence of how great things are done. It has been lost to many, that most of the great innovations from which we have benefited actually originated from fairly humble beginnings or circumstances.

Stephen Hanselman
 

Hmmm, to an extent I'd have to disagree sort of. When I was coming up in the SF Bay Area the watch word was to go work at Tek for a couple of years them go someplace that would actually pay a semi-living wage. At the time Tek paid Beaverton wages in the middle of Silicon Valley.

On the other hand EVERYONE said if you wanted to polish electronics skills Tek was the place to go

Steve

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io <TekScopes@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tony Fleming
Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2019 9:55 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 100 Tek Photos

Lets hope that they move back to USA!
Lots of companies are coming back to USA and that would be great!
Nothing is for ever and after changes in our government, we will see if they STAY in the USA or not!

On Thu, Sep 12, 2019 at 11:47 AM Mlynch001 <@mlynch001> wrote:

Chuck,

I don't think those observations are at all disparaging, they simply
are evidence of how great things are done. It has been lost to many,
that most of the great innovations from which we have benefited
actually originated from fairly humble beginnings or circumstances.
From what I have read about early TEKTRONIX corporate culture and
policies, I would say that these people were not so much worried about
peg boards and home built work benches. By all accounts Mr. Vollum and Mr.
Murdock as well as other TEK management, treated their workers well,
especially in the ways that count. In the early days, there was none
of the "them against us" attitude which permeated most corporations of
the day AND dominates the corporate landscape today. Compare "blue
collar" TEK of the day to "blue collar" GM (and many others as well)
of the day, the difference in corporate culture and treatment of the
rank and file people are 180 degrees opposite. I cannot recall
reading an account of any TEK employee of the day remembering that the
company was a terrible or oppressive place to work. On the other
hand, there are tens of thousands who wrote and remember the awful
working conditions at GM (and other contemporary companies') plants during the same time period.
The most productive days of the TEK legacy were those that
germinated from what now may be regarded as "sparse" working
conditions. In general, people appreciate and respond to being
treated like they have immense value to the company and are equals.
These people were members of that "Greatest Generation" what came out
of the Depression and WWII, these people persisted and succeeded as they had always done, in spite of hardships.
This spirit is what is missing in most "modern corporate" culture of
the day and continues to dominate today. We may have fancy offices
and state of the art facilities, but workers are not generally
appreciated or respected by their "bosses". Workers are simply
another cubicle wall, copier or desk that can be easily replaced when
the board of directors decides that the company image needs an "upgrade". Most of the "sparse"
working conditions (and the blue collar jobs) have moved to Asian
"sweat shops", what remains here are the gleaming edifices of "the corporation".
No jobs, except for the Board of directors and the administration staff.
I, myself, would rather that I was treated as if I was important,
even vital part of a company and work from a "home made" work bench.
There seems to be little evidence that these workers did not have the
tools that they needed, but the spirit of innovation and the frugal
nature of these people are visible in these sparse, home made
facilities. Since there was a generous performance bonus at the time,
I would bet that many people said, "Hey! we don't need that expensive
office suite or workbench, let's build one out of this stuff" and the
savings went into the profit of the company. Profits which the "blue
collar" employee actually benefited from. Compared to today, where
any "Profit" generally goes to the CEO and others at the top, the
workers get little or nothing (except the blame for lack of profit).
Early expansion of TEK facilities was driven by need, not by
appearance of corporate image. Oh what a change when compared to today's culture.
You are correct, being a continent away from government interference
did not hurt. Today, that has all changed, It seems as these work
benches and pegboards disappeared from TEKTRONIX, so did the
innovative spirit of the workers. In later years, the facilities
became very grand, and the shift from "actual results" to "corporate
image" became complete. In short, the spirit of Mr. Vollum and Mr.
Murdock (and others of their vein) was replaced by the faceless "board of directors", it was downhill from there.


Just my thoughts and ramblings.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR



Tony Fleming
 

Lets hope that they move back to USA!
Lots of companies are coming back to USA and that would be great!
Nothing is for ever and after changes in our government, we will see if
they STAY in the USA or not!

On Thu, Sep 12, 2019 at 11:47 AM Mlynch001 <@mlynch001> wrote:

Chuck,

I don't think those observations are at all disparaging, they simply are
evidence of how great things are done. It has been lost to many, that most
of the great innovations from which we have benefited actually originated
from fairly humble beginnings or circumstances.
From what I have read about early TEKTRONIX corporate culture and
policies, I would say that these people were not so much worried about peg
boards and home built work benches. By all accounts Mr. Vollum and Mr.
Murdock as well as other TEK management, treated their workers well,
especially in the ways that count. In the early days, there was none of
the "them against us" attitude which permeated most corporations of the day
AND dominates the corporate landscape today. Compare "blue collar" TEK of
the day to "blue collar" GM (and many others as well) of the day, the
difference in corporate culture and treatment of the rank and file people
are 180 degrees opposite. I cannot recall reading an account of any TEK
employee of the day remembering that the company was a terrible or
oppressive place to work. On the other hand, there are tens of thousands
who wrote and remember the awful working conditions at GM (and other
contemporary companies') plants during the same time period.
The most productive days of the TEK legacy were those that germinated
from what now may be regarded as "sparse" working conditions. In general,
people appreciate and respond to being treated like they have immense value
to the company and are equals. These people were members of that "Greatest
Generation" what came out of the Depression and WWII, these people
persisted and succeeded as they had always done, in spite of hardships.
This spirit is what is missing in most "modern corporate" culture of the
day and continues to dominate today. We may have fancy offices and state
of the art facilities, but workers are not generally appreciated or
respected by their "bosses". Workers are simply another cubicle wall,
copier or desk that can be easily replaced when the board of directors
decides that the company image needs an "upgrade". Most of the "sparse"
working conditions (and the blue collar jobs) have moved to Asian "sweat
shops", what remains here are the gleaming edifices of "the corporation".
No jobs, except for the Board of directors and the administration staff.
I, myself, would rather that I was treated as if I was important, even
vital part of a company and work from a "home made" work bench. There
seems to be little evidence that these workers did not have the tools that
they needed, but the spirit of innovation and the frugal nature of these
people are visible in these sparse, home made facilities. Since there was
a generous performance bonus at the time, I would bet that many people
said, "Hey! we don't need that expensive office suite or workbench, let's
build one out of this stuff" and the savings went into the profit of the
company. Profits which the "blue collar" employee actually benefited
from. Compared to today, where any "Profit" generally goes to the CEO and
others at the top, the workers get little or nothing (except the blame for
lack of profit). Early expansion of TEK facilities was driven by need, not
by appearance of corporate image. Oh what a change when compared to
today's culture.
You are correct, being a continent away from government interference did
not hurt. Today, that has all changed, It seems as these work benches and
pegboards disappeared from TEKTRONIX, so did the innovative spirit of the
workers. In later years, the facilities became very grand, and the shift
from "actual results" to "corporate image" became complete. In short, the
spirit of Mr. Vollum and Mr. Murdock (and others of their vein) was
replaced by the faceless "board of directors", it was downhill from there.


Just my thoughts and ramblings.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR



Mlynch001
 

Chuck,

I don't think those observations are at all disparaging, they simply are evidence of how great things are done. It has been lost to many, that most of the great innovations from which we have benefited actually originated from fairly humble beginnings or circumstances.
From what I have read about early TEKTRONIX corporate culture and policies, I would say that these people were not so much worried about peg boards and home built work benches. By all accounts Mr. Vollum and Mr. Murdock as well as other TEK management, treated their workers well, especially in the ways that count. In the early days, there was none of the "them against us" attitude which permeated most corporations of the day AND dominates the corporate landscape today. Compare "blue collar" TEK of the day to "blue collar" GM (and many others as well) of the day, the difference in corporate culture and treatment of the rank and file people are 180 degrees opposite. I cannot recall reading an account of any TEK employee of the day remembering that the company was a terrible or oppressive place to work. On the other hand, there are tens of thousands who wrote and remember the awful working conditions at GM (and other contemporary companies') plants during the same time period.
The most productive days of the TEK legacy were those that germinated from what now may be regarded as "sparse" working conditions. In general, people appreciate and respond to being treated like they have immense value to the company and are equals. These people were members of that "Greatest Generation" what came out of the Depression and WWII, these people persisted and succeeded as they had always done, in spite of hardships. This spirit is what is missing in most "modern corporate" culture of the day and continues to dominate today. We may have fancy offices and state of the art facilities, but workers are not generally appreciated or respected by their "bosses". Workers are simply another cubicle wall, copier or desk that can be easily replaced when the board of directors decides that the company image needs an "upgrade". Most of the "sparse" working conditions (and the blue collar jobs) have moved to Asian "sweat shops", what remains here are the gleaming edifices of "the corporation". No jobs, except for the Board of directors and the administration staff.
I, myself, would rather that I was treated as if I was important, even vital part of a company and work from a "home made" work bench. There seems to be little evidence that these workers did not have the tools that they needed, but the spirit of innovation and the frugal nature of these people are visible in these sparse, home made facilities. Since there was a generous performance bonus at the time, I would bet that many people said, "Hey! we don't need that expensive office suite or workbench, let's build one out of this stuff" and the savings went into the profit of the company. Profits which the "blue collar" employee actually benefited from. Compared to today, where any "Profit" generally goes to the CEO and others at the top, the workers get little or nothing (except the blame for lack of profit). Early expansion of TEK facilities was driven by need, not by appearance of corporate image. Oh what a change when compared to today's culture.
You are correct, being a continent away from government interference did not hurt. Today, that has all changed, It seems as these work benches and pegboards disappeared from TEKTRONIX, so did the innovative spirit of the workers. In later years, the facilities became very grand, and the shift from "actual results" to "corporate image" became complete. In short, the spirit of Mr. Vollum and Mr. Murdock (and others of their vein) was replaced by the faceless "board of directors", it was downhill from there.

Just my thoughts and ramblings.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR

Harvey White
 

On 9/12/2019 11:03 AM, Chuck Harris wrote:
Interesting how much of the office furniture, warehouse
equipment, benches, workspaces, etc, were tek built on
the cheap. Pegboard and 2x2 built office carrels...
Much of which we see in the particleboard equivalents from box stores of all types.

Not meaning to be disparaging, but it looks like the stuff
my depression raised farm boy father used to make out of
wooden peach crates and pallets found around the back of
the supermarket... in other words, like my early childhood.

[I was 7 or 8 before I first sat, slept, ate, studied, or
played on anything my father didn't make by hand from
discarded materials, after work.... but I digress.]
I've rather been there, but on the electronics side.  Not that my father made the stuff, I did.  Baking pans make nice chassis for tube projects.  An oscilloscope, copied from the Heathkit schematic reduced to mousetype in their catalog, with a surplus CRT, (they had them at that time).



It must have been a noisy, dusty, demoralizing environment for
the blue collar workers. And yet, they did some amazing work.
How could it be demoralizing?  It certainly wasn't state of the art, but I'll bet that the tools themselves were quality, the equipment was quality.  So what does it matter if the workbench is made from 2x4 lumber and plywood rather than grain matched hard maple and custom steel extrusions?  Looks nice is good, but not essential.

Noisy?  Hmmm, I remember electronics assembly lines for a military contractor with the noises from the machine shop resounding over the line.  It worked for them.

The quality of the work is directly related to the quality of the workers, IMHO.  Tektronix got good ones, let them do their best jobs, and then (I suspect) let them alone to do their best work.

Harvey



Probably the perfect distance from Washington, DC to get some
work done without interferrence.

-Chuck Harris

Kurt Rosenfeld wrote:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1YoJB_t2OX3jd6xqaJcXolzmO09kzH8zU

I didn't take the photos and don't know anything about them. All I did is scan them. Enjoy.




Chuck Harris
 

Interesting how much of the office furniture, warehouse
equipment, benches, workspaces, etc, were tek built on
the cheap. Pegboard and 2x2 built office carrels...

Not meaning to be disparaging, but it looks like the stuff
my depression raised farm boy father used to make out of
wooden peach crates and pallets found around the back of
the supermarket... in other words, like my early childhood.

[I was 7 or 8 before I first sat, slept, ate, studied, or
played on anything my father didn't make by hand from
discarded materials, after work.... but I digress.]

It must have been a noisy, dusty, demoralizing environment for
the blue collar workers. And yet, they did some amazing work.

Probably the perfect distance from Washington, DC to get some
work done without interferrence.

-Chuck Harris

Kurt Rosenfeld wrote:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1YoJB_t2OX3jd6xqaJcXolzmO09kzH8zU

I didn't take the photos and don't know anything about them. All I did is scan them. Enjoy.