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Clock error on TDS3034

amirb
 

is there any command that can set the number of power cycles and hours of operation on TDS3000 series?

i hacked a battery for the DS1742W but now I have lost the above information... I tried to read the chip before
hacking it and saved the file (read several times and saved by GQ-4x4 programmer) but when I tried to reprogram the chip
(after I added the battery) it didnt program it and failed with error even though the device is supposed to be supported...

 

A few months ago, H??kan responded as follows to my question re. clearing the error log of my THS720A:

If you connect a PC running a terminal program to the serial port
of the THS
you can try sending first PASSWORD PITBULL and then ERRLOG CLEAR.
It doesn't clear any RS232 errors but it resets the numbers of
power up and
most likely power on errors (mine has no errors so I can't say for
sure).

It worked fine on my THS720A and on my TDS3034, it clears the error log but neither # of powerups nor power on hours.
Thanks Raymond. I finally got a chance to try this. It works, but not on version 3.41 of the firmware. I tested on 3.35 and it cleared the logs, but did not clear the power-up count (which would be kind of dumb anyway...)

Jay

Heinz Breuer
 

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Harvey White
 

Ah, now that's the difference.  These were specifically made to replace CCFL tubes.  I was thinking of something else, a more common LED strip.  I'll look them up.  I have more than enough of them, and assembling them isn't much of a chore, but that ought to work for lots of people as long as the voltages are OK.

Harvey

On 5/31/2019 1:48 PM, Bob Koller via Groups.Io wrote:
The strips I have are 5mm pitch LED, and 2mm wide. Obtained, as I recall on eBay as CCFL cut-to-length retrofit strips.



Bob Koller
 

The strips I have are 5mm pitch LED, and 2mm wide. Obtained, as I recall on eBay as CCFL cut-to-length retrofit strips.

Harvey White
 

On 5/31/2019 11:35 AM, Bob Koller via Groups.Io wrote:
There are also generic LED strips available where you can trim to length, within a 3-LED pitch, as the electrical configuration is 3 LED's in series, with each triplet in parallel.
I have used these to replace the CCFL in several LCD modules. They come with a small inverter that provides intensity control.
If those are the same that I have seen, the LEDs are about 1 inch apart.  The strips are about half an inch wide.  The strips that I have used are about 1/8 inch wide, take up about 3/16 in depth and have six or seven LEDs on the front, and the same number of SMT 1206 resistors on the back.  The LEDS are 1/2 inch or less apart. That may be a requirement dependent on the diffuser that the display manufacturer.

For this design, I opted for lower voltage so this runs from +4 to +5 depending on the series resistors and the design current for the LEDS.

What they do for a commercial replacement is another matter, I don't know.  Mine are designed to fit in the same (roughly) physical space as the original CCFL lamp.

Looks as if the CCFL lamps that you replaced have a much larger size.

Harvey



Bob Koller
 

There are also generic LED strips available where you can trim to length, within a 3-LED pitch, as the electrical configuration is 3 LED's in series, with each triplet in parallel.
I have used these to replace the CCFL in several LCD modules. They come with a small inverter that provides intensity control.

Harvey White
 

There are LED replacement strips available for many CCFL tubes, but need to be ordered on a specific display number, of course. You can make an LED strip using surface mount LEDS, etc.  Those do have some point source problems, but a wide dispersion angle LED may work.

Harvey

On 5/31/2019 6:58 AM, David Kuhn wrote:
" You may have read in my recent post that I have successfully dug out the
empty battery and connected another one so my quest is over. "

Could you email pics of that, or publish them here? I would like to know,
where in that chip the battery is. I saved my old chip and had intended
to "dig" in to it at some time. Then what, find a 2032 battery socket
somewhere, or rob one off an old mother board and glue that socket to the
top of the chip? There may be some space issues inside the scope where to
put that socket on the chip, or locate it out of the way and run wires.

The original series of the TDS3032 and TDS3034 are still great scopes (I
used to have a 3034 and a 3054 at work before GE Closed us down and moved
the plant overseas). Now, I own two TDS3032s. I have automatic software
that I wrote that uses the scopes via GPIB as part of a test system for
instruments that I work on. I replaced one of the backlight tubes in my
one TDS3032 to brighten up the display. The display is the same one used
in an instrument I work on. I had located a source of the backlight tubes,
but that has dried up now. I have a supply to use for my customer's
instruments, but don't know if I could find them anymore. I had the NEC
part number for those tubes, but may not be able to find it anymore.
Anyway, I think they are super scopes. They have a great digitization rate
for their time. They have features some new scopes can not offer. Here's
a big one: Set the Mid-Reference points for the pulse width measurements.
The TDS3000 series is the only one I have seen that has that feature. You
can get a TDS3032 for $1500, or less. New the TDS3032C is somewhere around
$10K?!! It has a USB socket and maybe able to interface via network, but
other than that, it is still basically the same as far as I can tell.

Dave

Dave

On Thu, May 30, 2019 at 10:37 AM Raymond Domp Frank <@Raymond>
wrote:

Thanks David K. for your info. The company that you linked to seems to
have 1 (!) clock/ram module left.
You may have read in my recent post that I have successfully dug out the
empty battery and connected another one so my quest is over.

Raymond




Jim Ford
 

Yep, we use the TDS3032B, 3034B, and 3054B at work (Raytheon).  Great little scopes!I get the CR2032 coin cells from Digi-Key in quantity 50 for about 25 cents apiece.  Versus several dollars apiece at the drugstore.  I use 'em in my pocket LED flashlight and LED baseball cap.The backup battery in my TLA711 controller went out a couple years ago so I tried to replace the module (memory, battery, and 32. kHz crystal) with a memory chip with the xtal and CR2032 holder soldered on top.  But I botched the job and lost a trace or two on the board.  Someday I'll ask this group where to get a schematic....Good luck, David.I was lucky in that the coin cell holder fit nicely over the rather large 24-pin DIP memory IC.  Pins were just far enough apart to solder down and hold the holder in place.Jim Ford Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: David Kuhn <Daveyk021@...> Date: 5/31/19 3:58 AM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Clock error on TDS3034 " You may have read in my recent post that I have successfully dug out theempty battery and connected another one so my quest is over.  "Could you email pics of that, or publish them here?  I would like to know,where in that chip the battery is.   I saved my old chip and had intendedto "dig" in to it at some time.  Then what, find a 2032 battery socketsomewhere, or rob one off an old mother board and glue that socket to thetop of the chip?  There may be some space issues inside the scope where toput that socket on the chip, or locate it out of the way and run wires.The original series of the TDS3032 and TDS3034 are still great scopes (Iused to have a 3034 and a 3054 at work before GE Closed us down and movedthe plant overseas).    Now, I own two TDS3032s.  I have automatic softwarethat I wrote that uses the scopes via GPIB as part of a test system forinstruments that I work on.  I replaced one of the backlight tubes in myone TDS3032 to brighten up the display.  The display is the same one usedin an instrument I work on.  I had located a source of the backlight tubes,but that has dried up now.  I have a supply to use for my customer'sinstruments, but don't know if I could find them anymore.  I had the NECpart number for those tubes, but may not be able to find it anymore.Anyway, I think they are super scopes.  They have a great digitization ratefor their time.  They have features some new scopes can not offer.  Here'sa big one: Set the Mid-Reference points for the pulse width measurements. The TDS3000 series is the only one I have seen that has that feature.  Youcan get a TDS3032 for $1500, or less.  New the TDS3032C is somewhere around$10K?!!  It has a USB socket and maybe able to interface via network, butother than that, it is still basically the same as far as I can tell.DaveDaveOn Thu, May 30, 2019 at 10:37 AM Raymond Domp Frank <@Raymond>wrote:> Thanks David K. for your info. The company that you linked to seems to> have 1 (!) clock/ram module left.> You may have read in my recent post that I have successfully dug out the> empty battery and connected another one so my quest is over.>> Raymond>> >>

 

Images of battery removal here: https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=91131

I got the battery out of the DS1742W-150 clock module/RAM as follows:
Looking at the top of the module, pin 1 at the lower left, I saw a slight circular bulge in the top area above pins 7 - 18, so about the right half of the module. Since I hadn't been successful in trying to purchase a new module, I decided to go in and remove material from the top right half. After milling off about 2 mm, I reached the minus (-) pole of the Lithium battery with a metal tab welded on. I wedged in a surgical knife between battery and tab and bent the tab back, away from the "theater". I was able to free the rest of the battery by digging further until I could slightly move the battery up and down. I removed more material from the side (above pins 15-16) so I could slip in a surgical knife underneath. Using that and without being able to see the exact layout, I was able to cut off the plus (+) tab underneath by easing the knife between battery and welded-on tab. I took care not to take too much material away to the left of the battery because I suspect that's where the quartz lives.
Not a very big deal apart from the "heroism" to go in and risk it all but it made me a happy camper...

I soldered a pair of wires to the tabs, covered the area with heat glue and connected a CR2032 in a socket. I put the module with battery on top into a low profile socket on the PCB. Leaves about 3 mm room.
Timekeeping is fine, GPIB address, time/div and vertical settings are remembered flawlessly.

Raymond

David Kuhn
 

" You may have read in my recent post that I have successfully dug out the
empty battery and connected another one so my quest is over. "

Could you email pics of that, or publish them here? I would like to know,
where in that chip the battery is. I saved my old chip and had intended
to "dig" in to it at some time. Then what, find a 2032 battery socket
somewhere, or rob one off an old mother board and glue that socket to the
top of the chip? There may be some space issues inside the scope where to
put that socket on the chip, or locate it out of the way and run wires.

The original series of the TDS3032 and TDS3034 are still great scopes (I
used to have a 3034 and a 3054 at work before GE Closed us down and moved
the plant overseas). Now, I own two TDS3032s. I have automatic software
that I wrote that uses the scopes via GPIB as part of a test system for
instruments that I work on. I replaced one of the backlight tubes in my
one TDS3032 to brighten up the display. The display is the same one used
in an instrument I work on. I had located a source of the backlight tubes,
but that has dried up now. I have a supply to use for my customer's
instruments, but don't know if I could find them anymore. I had the NEC
part number for those tubes, but may not be able to find it anymore.
Anyway, I think they are super scopes. They have a great digitization rate
for their time. They have features some new scopes can not offer. Here's
a big one: Set the Mid-Reference points for the pulse width measurements.
The TDS3000 series is the only one I have seen that has that feature. You
can get a TDS3032 for $1500, or less. New the TDS3032C is somewhere around
$10K?!! It has a USB socket and maybe able to interface via network, but
other than that, it is still basically the same as far as I can tell.

Dave

Dave

On Thu, May 30, 2019 at 10:37 AM Raymond Domp Frank <@Raymond>
wrote:

Thanks David K. for your info. The company that you linked to seems to
have 1 (!) clock/ram module left.
You may have read in my recent post that I have successfully dug out the
empty battery and connected another one so my quest is over.

Raymond



 

Thanks David K. for your info. The company that you linked to seems to have 1 (!) clock/ram module left.
You may have read in my recent post that I have successfully dug out the empty battery and connected another one so my quest is over.

Raymond

David Kuhn
 

" I recently bought a nice TDS3034.
Unfortunately, its clock has a problem: I may set date and time but it does
not keep it, not even without a restart. "

Hello Raymond. I found a Dallas DRAM from some place in Florida that
someone on here recommended (it may have been on the EEVBLOG forum. I know
that's not much help. But once replaced, the scope booted all weird and
wouldn't boot. I needed to hold in the "B TRIG" button while powering-up
to reset the scope.

With my nearly dead DRAM, not only did it loose time, it also could not
remember the GPIB address, it kept resetting to "0".

Do not buy the DALLAS DRAM on EBAY from China. They send you a fake chip
for ~$35.

Okay, I think I found it. I think I bought the DALLAS DRAM chip from:
NAC Group, Inc. dba NAC Semi <http://www.nacsemi.com/>http://www.nacsemi.com
I got lucky and go a chip with some battery life left in. When I replace
it, I solder lead carriers in to the board. They were short enough that
the chip could get installed and have room (with may 1/4" to spare) for the
I/O module cage when re-assembling. I paid $38.99 for the chip.
Dave

On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 1:42 PM Raymond Domp Frank <@Raymond>
wrote:

I recently bought a nice TDS3034.
Unfortunately, its clock has a problem: I may set date and time but it
does not keep it, not even without a restart.
Could this be just a bad backup battery and if so, could the calibration
state be affected, either already or when replacing the battery? Does this
model have a Dallas NVRAM?
I’m not at home so I haven’t had time to check amplitude calibration etc.
nor opened the case. Fast edge seems ok (have a Leo Bodnar pulser with me).
Thanks for any responses!
Raymond



 

A few months ago, Håkan responded as follows to my question re. clearing the error log of my THS720A:

If you connect a PC running a terminal program to the serial port of the THS
you can try sending first PASSWORD PITBULL and then ERRLOG CLEAR.
It doesn't clear any RS232 errors but it resets the numbers of power up and
most likely power on errors (mine has no errors so I can't say for sure).
It worked fine on my THS720A and on my TDS3034, it clears the error log but neither # of powerups nor power on hours.

Raymond

 

I have a working GPIB connection and have successfully cleared the error log in the TDS3034. It had many entries from a failed plug-in interface module, sometime in the past.

Hi Raymond,

What command clears the logs?

Thanks.

Jay

Jim Ford
 

Sounds like the girl from the relativity limerick had owned it:There once was a girl named Miss BrightWho traveled much faster than lightShe departed one dayThe Einsteinian wayAnd returned on the previous night!Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Raymond Domp Frank <@Raymond> Date: 5/29/19 8:31 PM (GMT-08:00) To: TekScopes@groups.io Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Clock error on TDS3034 I have successfully removed the empty lithium battery in my DALLAS DS1742W-150 and connected an external Lithium cell (CR2032).The clock runs fine again and remembers time and date.I'd like to reset the number of powerups (655) and more importantly, the total operating time, which is shown as -23598522 hours!Any ideas?Raymond

 

On Thu, May 30, 2019 at 05:31 AM, Raymond Domp Frank wrote:


I'd like to reset the number of powerups (655) and more importantly, the total
operating time, which is shown as -23598522 hours!
Any ideas?
I have a working GPIB connection and have successfully cleared the error log in the TDS3034. It had many entries from a failed plug-in interface module, sometime in the past. But a command to (re)set total operating time?
The 'scope is still nicely in calibration so I wouldn't want to go that way.

Raymond

 

I have successfully removed the empty lithium battery in my DALLAS DS1742W-150 and connected an external Lithium cell (CR2032).
The clock runs fine again and remembers time and date.

I'd like to reset the number of powerups (655) and more importantly, the total operating time, which is shown as -23598522 hours!
Any ideas?

Raymond

 

Thanks (again), Håkan!
Raymond

 

On Sun, May 26, 2019 at 07:42 PM, Raymond Domp Frank wrote:


Does this model have a Dallas NVRAM?
Yes, Timekeeping RAM DS1742W-150.

/Håkan