Compressed air


 

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?

Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?

I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air? Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?

Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air compressor?

Thanks.


 

Ah, I somehow lost the first sentence of the email which was: "should one
shake compressed air or not?"

I guess i need to learn how to post!

On Wed, 1 May 2019, 14:53 cheater00 cheater00 <cheater00@gmail.com wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?

Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?

I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air? Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?

Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air compressor?

Thanks.


Chuck Harris <cfharris@...>
 

"Canned Air" is simply liquefied R134a refrigerant in a
can with a trigger nozzle. The cans are the same cans
you can buy at the auto parts store to charge your car's
air conditioner... but with a trigger nozzle screwed to
the top of the can.

If you hold the can upside down while you press the trigger,
you will get liquid refrigerant spraying out the nozzle...
this is also known as "freeze" spray.

I prefer not to use the "Canned Air" because it sprays quite
cold, which tends to cause condensation... and because I think
it very irresponsible to release refrigerant into the air.

-Chuck Harris

cheater cheater wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?

Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?

I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air? Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?

Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air compressor?

Thanks.




Caveman
 

Photographer as well as a repair tech here, and I say do not shake cans of commercially available compressed air used for blowing dust away. They can splatter whatever is in the can onto lens coatings, or in the old days negatives, ruining them.

Not knowing what is in the can, but knowing that it can blow droplets of whatever it is into what you are cleaning means that while you are blowing dust away, you are also blowing moisture of some kind on what you are cleaning. If that moisture is oily then it will become a dust collector.

I’ve heard some say that you can invert the cans of compressed air, like Dust Off or other dust blowers, to use them for cold testing components. If so just be sure to clean up afterwards.

FWIW,
Don Kemper

On May 1, 2019, at 9:17 AM, cheater cheater <cheater00@gmail.com> wrote:

Ah, I somehow lost the first sentence of the email which was: "should one
shake compressed air or not?"

I guess i need to learn how to post!

On Wed, 1 May 2019, 14:53 cheater00 cheater00 <cheater00@gmail.com wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?

Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?

I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air? Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?

Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air compressor?

Thanks.


David Kuhn
 

I plumb the shop with a compressed air (and a compressor in the garage). I
use a small dryer in-line with the spray naucial (sp).

On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 10:13 AM Caveman <digcam1@roadrunner.com> wrote:

Photographer as well as a repair tech here, and I say do not shake cans of
commercially available compressed air used for blowing dust away. They can
splatter whatever is in the can onto lens coatings, or in the old days
negatives, ruining them.

Not knowing what is in the can, but knowing that it can blow droplets of
whatever it is into what you are cleaning means that while you are blowing
dust away, you are also blowing moisture of some kind on what you are
cleaning. If that moisture is oily then it will become a dust collector.

I’ve heard some say that you can invert the cans of compressed air, like
Dust Off or other dust blowers, to use them for cold testing components. If
so just be sure to clean up afterwards.

FWIW,
Don Kemper


On May 1, 2019, at 9:17 AM, cheater cheater <cheater00@gmail.com> wrote:

Ah, I somehow lost the first sentence of the email which was: "should one
shake compressed air or not?"

I guess i need to learn how to post!

On Wed, 1 May 2019, 14:53 cheater00 cheater00 <cheater00@gmail.com
wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?

Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?

I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air? Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?

Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air
compressor?

Thanks.





Daniel Koller
 

Hi All,
   There is no such thing as "canned air" really.   All of the "canned air" products on the market have some sort of gas (not air), which when compressed, becomes liquefied.   It is the vapor pressure of the liquid which provides the pressure to blow off the dust.  As you let some gas out of the can, more evaporates to maintain a relatively constant pressure until the liquid runs out, and then the pressure quickly drops.   
    If instead you take a old can of "canned air" and put a Schraeder valve on it so you can re-fill it with an air compressor and put actual air in it, you will be sorely disappointed (as I was).   The physics is pretty simple and the pressure will just decrease exponentially as you let the air out of the can, and it rapidly becomes useless.   I get about 5 seconds of useful dusting pressure out of a can before I have to re-fill it.  It's good for a blast or two. 
   I HIGHLY recommend using an air compressor and plumbing your shop as opposed to using portable canned air products.  Even the Non-CFC versions are really nasty stuff to the environment.  They don't kill the ozone layer, but they contribute substantially to global warming.  See:
https://www.epa.gov/sites/production/files/documents/dusters.pdf

  I don't mean for this to roam off-topic, but since it was brought up, figured I'd mention it.   Also hope no one wastes their time trying to re-fill a duster can as it just doesn't work.
Dan

On Wednesday, May 1, 2019, 10:19:01 AM EDT, David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

I plumb the shop with a compressed air (and a compressor in the garage).  I
use a small dryer in-line with the spray naucial (sp).

On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 10:13 AM Caveman <digcam1@roadrunner.com> wrote:

Photographer as well as a repair tech here, and I say do not shake cans of
commercially available compressed air used for blowing dust away. They can
splatter whatever is in the can onto lens coatings, or in the old days
negatives, ruining them.

Not knowing what is in the can, but knowing that it can blow droplets of
whatever it is into what you are cleaning means that while you are blowing
dust away, you are also blowing moisture of some kind on what you are
cleaning. If that moisture is oily then it will become a dust collector.

I’ve heard some say that you can invert the cans of compressed air, like
Dust Off or other dust blowers, to use them for cold testing components. If
so just be sure to clean up afterwards.

FWIW,
Don Kemper


On May 1, 2019, at 9:17 AM, cheater cheater <cheater00@gmail.com> wrote:

Ah, I somehow lost the first sentence of the email which was: "should one
shake compressed air or not?"

I guess i need to learn how to post!

On Wed, 1 May 2019, 14:53 cheater00 cheater00 <cheater00@gmail.com
wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?

Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?

I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air? Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?

Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air
compressor?

Thanks.





 

Hi Damian,

This is a simple subject to learn more about on your own and IT IS NOT RELEVANT TO TEKSCOPES. If you want to know more, I know you are smart enough to search out compressor filters on google yourself rather than posting off topic questions to TekScopes.

Compressed air from a compressor contain whatever happens to be in the compressor tank. That is almost water which can easily be seen in the compressed air coming out. There is a little valve at the bottom of the tank to drain all the water from the tank. There can be other things in the tank as well such as hydrocarbons from the compressor's motor or from the pump (depending on what type and size of compressor) plus whatever particles are in the air that was sucked in by the compressor.

At the very least anyone with a compressed air system will have an inline water trap or air-dryer in their system. In addition you can also find reasons to install an air filter to catch particles. For example take a look at this inexpensive PneumaticPlus SAU4030M-N06DG-MEP Three Stage Air Drying System - Air Particulate Filter, 0.3 Micron Coalescing Filter & Air Pressure Regulator
https://www.pneumaticplus.com/pneumaticplus-sau-series-three-stage-air-drying-system-3-4-npt/

Dennis Tillman W7PF

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
David Kuhn
Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2019 7:18 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Compressed air

I plumb the shop with a compressed air (and a compressor in the garage).
I use a small dryer in-line with the spray naucial (sp).

On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 10:13 AM Caveman <digcam1@roadrunner.com> wrote:

Photographer as well as a repair tech here, and I say do not shake
cans of commercially available compressed air used for blowing dust
away. They can splatter whatever is in the can onto lens coatings, or
in the old days negatives, ruining them.

Not knowing what is in the can, but knowing that it can blow droplets
of whatever it is into what you are cleaning means that while you are
blowing dust away, you are also blowing moisture of some kind on what
you are cleaning. If that moisture is oily then it will become a dust
collector.

I’ve heard some say that you can invert the cans of compressed air,
like Dust Off or other dust blowers, to use them for cold testing
components. If so just be sure to clean up afterwards.

FWIW,
Don Kemper


On May 1, 2019, at 9:17 AM, cheater cheater <cheater00@gmail.com>
wrote:

Ah, I somehow lost the first sentence of the email which was:
"should one shake compressed air or not?"

I guess i need to learn how to post!

On Wed, 1 May 2019, 14:53 cheater00 cheater00 <cheater00@gmail.com
wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?

Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always
the case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?

I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon
and they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with
compressed air? Two things people brought up were one brand
produced very weak pressure, and another produced flammable rather
than inert gas.
Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?

Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air
compressor?

Thanks.



--
Dennis Tillman W7PF
TekScopes Moderator


Harvey White
 

On Wed, 1 May 2019 14:53:04 +0200, you wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?
Compressed air isn't. There's not enough room in the an.


Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?
The fluid evaporates, produces gas, and that's what your "compressed
air" happens to be.



I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air?
Liquid for one, which you don't want, and then again, what's the
liquid that's evaporating to give you this "air"?

Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Depends on what's evaporating. Butane would work, so would freon, so
would a lot of other things, includin propane.

Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?
er..... what's in that liquid?


Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air compressor?
Because they don't have an air compressor. Because they don't know
the difference. Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor.
Because they don't have the driers and particle filters to clean up
the output air from the compressor (which may or may not have oil in
it from the air pump).

Harvey


Thanks.



David Kuhn
 

" Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor. "

That's the biggest problem. In the garage, I built a compressor dog house
with six inch walls with insulation on all side. Even the access door is
6" thick with insulation. It worked great, but the air compressor got
used hard. Well know the saying "out of sight, out of mind"? That's the
problem. It never got maintenance. Now, I just let it be noisy in the
garage as needed. I don't use it that much, so I just go out and turn it
on as-needed rather than let it be automatic. I would like to have a huge
tall tank that hold a lot of air; but they can be expensive. I need to go
to some auctions and find a six foot tall belt driven compressor that can
run only every so often and let it on automatic.


On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 9:59 PM Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info> wrote:

On Wed, 1 May 2019 14:53:04 +0200, you wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?
Compressed air isn't. There's not enough room in the an.


Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?
The fluid evaporates, produces gas, and that's what your "compressed
air" happens to be.



I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air?
Liquid for one, which you don't want, and then again, what's the
liquid that's evaporating to give you this "air"?

Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Depends on what's evaporating. Butane would work, so would freon, so
would a lot of other things, includin propane.

Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?
er..... what's in that liquid?


Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air compressor?
Because they don't have an air compressor. Because they don't know
the difference. Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor.
Because they don't have the driers and particle filters to clean up
the output air from the compressor (which may or may not have oil in
it from the air pump).

Harvey


Thanks.






Tony Fleming
 

Your idea is correct, the large belt driven compressors are the best and
places like Harbor Freight has them brand new for a reasonable price.
Don't forget the water filtration and drain the water from the tank. You
could make a "self draining" or "automatic" condensation purge with an
Arduino or ESP32/ESP8266 and few more parts to open valve.
But a reminder once a month should give you time to check the system and
drain the water from the tank.

On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 10:24 AM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor. "

That's the biggest problem. In the garage, I built a compressor dog house
with six inch walls with insulation on all side. Even the access door is
6" thick with insulation. It worked great, but the air compressor got
used hard. Well know the saying "out of sight, out of mind"? That's the
problem. It never got maintenance. Now, I just let it be noisy in the
garage as needed. I don't use it that much, so I just go out and turn it
on as-needed rather than let it be automatic. I would like to have a huge
tall tank that hold a lot of air; but they can be expensive. I need to go
to some auctions and find a six foot tall belt driven compressor that can
run only every so often and let it on automatic.


On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 9:59 PM Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info>
wrote:

On Wed, 1 May 2019 14:53:04 +0200, you wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?
Compressed air isn't. There's not enough room in the an.


Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?
The fluid evaporates, produces gas, and that's what your "compressed
air" happens to be.



I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air?
Liquid for one, which you don't want, and then again, what's the
liquid that's evaporating to give you this "air"?

Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Depends on what's evaporating. Butane would work, so would freon, so
would a lot of other things, includin propane.

Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?
er..... what's in that liquid?


Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air
compressor?

Because they don't have an air compressor. Because they don't know
the difference. Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor.
Because they don't have the driers and particle filters to clean up
the output air from the compressor (which may or may not have oil in
it from the air pump).

Harvey


Thanks.








David Kuhn
 

" Your idea is correct, the large belt driven compressors are the best and
places like Harbor Freight has them brand new for a reasonable price. "

Yea, I have been tempted a few times to use the 25% off coupon to get one,
but I usually do not hear good things about there electrical tools.

There is an elderly lady down the block that we are friends with. Her
husband (dead 20+ years now) has one of those six foot belt driver
compressors near their garage door; I think it is hard wired. She might
use it once a year. When I turned it on, it was amazingly not deafening.
It looks like it was built very well. I can't get her to give it or sell
it to me - lol. I kind of pine for it. It is very old, but still works
great and I am sure built better than anything harbor freight has. Anyway,
I'm not sure I should offer much because of its age and I might be better
off with a new one. They probably all need the pressure/electric switch
changed every few years and I am not sure where to get that part. My
original one in the dog house, probably 29 years old now and still looking
nice, needs that pressure switch. I could never find the MFG parts list
and you wouldn't get one from them after all these years. I haven't found
generic ones either. Maybe there is generic kits to re-plumb old air
compressors? I'll have to look.

Sorry, this is off topic, but I feel every electronics repair lab should
have compress air. Heck where I worked, before GE moved everything, and
our jobs overseas, I used a nice high pressure air line. I could wash
boards off with Simple green and then ISO and blow dry them do dry that I
could power them up right away without letting them dry overnight. The air
sound drove other around me nuts, but you do what you have to do. At one
point, maintenance was going to change my compressed air plumbing to the
nitrogen line (we had a huge nitrogen tank outside) for the drying of
boards, then our closing was announce and no one gave a shite about
anything for the next year and a half 8-(. So nitrogen would be better for
drying and dusting board than compressed air, but I would not want to foot
that bill.

Dave

Dave

On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 11:48 AM Tony Fleming <czecht@gmail.com> wrote:

Your idea is correct, the large belt driven compressors are the best and
places like Harbor Freight has them brand new for a reasonable price.
Don't forget the water filtration and drain the water from the tank. You
could make a "self draining" or "automatic" condensation purge with an
Arduino or ESP32/ESP8266 and few more parts to open valve.
But a reminder once a month should give you time to check the system and
drain the water from the tank.


On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 10:24 AM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor. "

That's the biggest problem. In the garage, I built a compressor dog
house
with six inch walls with insulation on all side. Even the access door is
6" thick with insulation. It worked great, but the air compressor got
used hard. Well know the saying "out of sight, out of mind"? That's the
problem. It never got maintenance. Now, I just let it be noisy in the
garage as needed. I don't use it that much, so I just go out and turn it
on as-needed rather than let it be automatic. I would like to have a
huge
tall tank that hold a lot of air; but they can be expensive. I need to
go
to some auctions and find a six foot tall belt driven compressor that can
run only every so often and let it on automatic.


On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 9:59 PM Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info>
wrote:

On Wed, 1 May 2019 14:53:04 +0200, you wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?
Compressed air isn't. There's not enough room in the an.


Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?
The fluid evaporates, produces gas, and that's what your "compressed
air" happens to be.



I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air?
Liquid for one, which you don't want, and then again, what's the
liquid that's evaporating to give you this "air"?

Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Depends on what's evaporating. Butane would work, so would freon, so
would a lot of other things, includin propane.

Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?
er..... what's in that liquid?


Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air
compressor?

Because they don't have an air compressor. Because they don't know
the difference. Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor.
Because they don't have the driers and particle filters to clean up
the output air from the compressor (which may or may not have oil in
it from the air pump).

Harvey


Thanks.










Tony Fleming
 

You are right Dave about need for air in a lab...
But the 25% coupon doesn't apply on compressors and other tools - call them
before you go there.
I have couple of their portable air compressors and I do not have much
trouble with them.
I also made this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVyGpwZZK6M&t=2s
Now it isn't much, but for my lab it works great and cost me nothing to put
together....
My plan is to add a large compressor in the garage and put in high pressure
lines in all 3 labs.
But that said, I need to add one more garage to my existing one; and that
is gonna bee sometimes in the future.
I bought lots of other products from HF and they do work fine, but they
aren't for professionals, who abuse them a little.
Tony

On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 11:51 AM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Your idea is correct, the large belt driven compressors are the best and
places like Harbor Freight has them brand new for a reasonable price. "

Yea, I have been tempted a few times to use the 25% off coupon to get one,
but I usually do not hear good things about there electrical tools.

There is an elderly lady down the block that we are friends with. Her
husband (dead 20+ years now) has one of those six foot belt driver
compressors near their garage door; I think it is hard wired. She might
use it once a year. When I turned it on, it was amazingly not deafening.
It looks like it was built very well. I can't get her to give it or sell
it to me - lol. I kind of pine for it. It is very old, but still works
great and I am sure built better than anything harbor freight has. Anyway,
I'm not sure I should offer much because of its age and I might be better
off with a new one. They probably all need the pressure/electric switch
changed every few years and I am not sure where to get that part. My
original one in the dog house, probably 29 years old now and still looking
nice, needs that pressure switch. I could never find the MFG parts list
and you wouldn't get one from them after all these years. I haven't found
generic ones either. Maybe there is generic kits to re-plumb old air
compressors? I'll have to look.

Sorry, this is off topic, but I feel every electronics repair lab should
have compress air. Heck where I worked, before GE moved everything, and
our jobs overseas, I used a nice high pressure air line. I could wash
boards off with Simple green and then ISO and blow dry them do dry that I
could power them up right away without letting them dry overnight. The air
sound drove other around me nuts, but you do what you have to do. At one
point, maintenance was going to change my compressed air plumbing to the
nitrogen line (we had a huge nitrogen tank outside) for the drying of
boards, then our closing was announce and no one gave a shite about
anything for the next year and a half 8-(. So nitrogen would be better for
drying and dusting board than compressed air, but I would not want to foot
that bill.

Dave

Dave

On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 11:48 AM Tony Fleming <czecht@gmail.com> wrote:

Your idea is correct, the large belt driven compressors are the best and
places like Harbor Freight has them brand new for a reasonable price.
Don't forget the water filtration and drain the water from the tank. You
could make a "self draining" or "automatic" condensation purge with an
Arduino or ESP32/ESP8266 and few more parts to open valve.
But a reminder once a month should give you time to check the system and
drain the water from the tank.


On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 10:24 AM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor. "

That's the biggest problem. In the garage, I built a compressor dog
house
with six inch walls with insulation on all side. Even the access door
is
6" thick with insulation. It worked great, but the air compressor got
used hard. Well know the saying "out of sight, out of mind"? That's
the
problem. It never got maintenance. Now, I just let it be noisy in the
garage as needed. I don't use it that much, so I just go out and turn
it
on as-needed rather than let it be automatic. I would like to have a
huge
tall tank that hold a lot of air; but they can be expensive. I need to
go
to some auctions and find a six foot tall belt driven compressor that
can
run only every so often and let it on automatic.


On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 9:59 PM Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info>
wrote:

On Wed, 1 May 2019 14:53:04 +0200, you wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?
Compressed air isn't. There's not enough room in the an.


Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always
the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?
The fluid evaporates, produces gas, and that's what your "compressed
air" happens to be.



I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air?
Liquid for one, which you don't want, and then again, what's the
liquid that's evaporating to give you this "air"?

Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Depends on what's evaporating. Butane would work, so would freon, so
would a lot of other things, includin propane.

Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?
er..... what's in that liquid?


Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air
compressor?

Because they don't have an air compressor. Because they don't know
the difference. Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor.
Because they don't have the driers and particle filters to clean up
the output air from the compressor (which may or may not have oil in
it from the air pump).

Harvey


Thanks.












Leon Robinson
 

The pressure switch is available at Graingers.

Sent from K5JLR

-------- Original message --------
From: David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com>
Date: 05/02/2019 11:50 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Compressed air

" Your idea is correct, the large belt driven compressors are the best and
places like Harbor Freight has them brand new for a reasonable price.  "

Yea, I have been tempted a few times to use the 25% off coupon to get one,
but I usually do not hear good things about there electrical tools.

There is an elderly lady down the block that we are friends with.  Her
husband (dead 20+ years now) has one of those six foot belt driver
compressors near their garage door; I think it is hard wired.  She might
use it once a year.  When I turned it on, it was amazingly not deafening.
It looks like it was built very well.  I can't get her to  give it or sell
it to me - lol.  I kind of pine for it.  It is very old, but still works
great and I am sure built better than anything harbor freight has.  Anyway,
I'm not sure I should offer much because of its age and I might be better
off with a new one.  They probably all need the pressure/electric switch
changed every few years and I am not sure where to get that part.  My
original one in the dog house, probably 29 years old now and still looking
nice, needs that pressure switch.  I could never find the MFG parts list
and you wouldn't get one from them after all these years.  I haven't found
generic ones either.  Maybe there is generic kits to re-plumb old air
compressors?  I'll have to look.

Sorry, this is off topic, but I feel every electronics repair lab should
have compress air.  Heck where I worked, before GE moved everything, and
our jobs overseas, I used a nice high pressure air line.  I could wash
boards off with Simple green and then ISO and blow dry them do dry that I
could power them up right away without letting them dry overnight.  The air
sound drove other around me nuts, but you do what you have to do.  At one
point, maintenance was going to change my compressed air plumbing to the
nitrogen line (we had a huge nitrogen tank outside) for the drying of
boards, then our closing was announce and no one gave a shite about
anything for the next year and a half 8-(.  So nitrogen would be better for
drying and dusting board than compressed air, but I would not want to foot
that bill.

Dave

Dave

On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 11:48 AM Tony Fleming <czecht@gmail.com> wrote:

Your idea is correct, the large belt driven compressors are the best and
places like Harbor Freight has them brand new for a reasonable price.
Don't forget the water filtration and drain the water from the tank. You
could make a "self draining" or "automatic" condensation purge with an
Arduino or ESP32/ESP8266 and few more parts to open valve.
But a reminder once a month should give you time to check the system and
drain the water from the tank.


On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 10:24 AM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor.  "

That's the biggest problem.  In the garage, I built a compressor dog
house
with six inch walls with insulation on all side.  Even the access door is
6" thick with insulation.  It worked great, but the air compressor got
used hard.  Well know the saying "out of sight, out of mind"?  That's the
problem.  It never got maintenance.  Now, I just let it be noisy in the
garage as needed.  I don't use it that much, so I just go out and turn it
on as-needed rather than let it be automatic.  I would like to have a
huge
tall tank that hold a lot of air; but they can be expensive.  I need to
go
to some auctions and find a six foot tall belt driven compressor that can
run only every so often and let it on automatic.


On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 9:59 PM Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info>
wrote:

On Wed, 1 May 2019 14:53:04 +0200, you wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?
Compressed air isn't.  There's not enough room in the an.


Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to shake
the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it always the
case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?
The fluid evaporates, produces gas, and that's what your "compressed
air" happens to be.



I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon and
they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with compressed
air?
Liquid for one, which you don't want, and then again, what's the
liquid that's evaporating to give you this "air"?

Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Depends on what's evaporating.  Butane would work, so would freon, so
would a lot of other things, includin propane.

Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?
er..... what's in that liquid?


Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air
compressor?

Because they don't have an air compressor.  Because they don't know
the difference.  Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor.
Because they don't have the driers and particle filters to clean up
the output air from the compressor (which may or may not have oil in
it from the air pump).

Harvey


Thanks.










Eric Schumacher
 

Hi Dave
Some observations from a long time compressor using hobbyist.
Universal Pressure switches are cheap and plentiful on ebay.
Belt driven iron piston compressors are best for long life if you change the oil every 10 years.
If you are only going to blow out things small cheap diaphragm types (think Speedair, 35 PSI max) are a solution.
Add an obsolete propane BBQ tank if you want more volume.
If you don't use it a lot and like quiet a nitrogen cylinder and regulator. Cylinders and regulators are common at swapmeets here in SoCA. Don't be intimidated by cylinders having the wrong type of gas, the valves are easy to change.
When I got a big 35 gal compressor my wife wanted me to move out and take my noisy machine with me. Solution was to add 3 ft long muffler made out of 3 inch PVC pipe. Connected to intake with Poly urethane hose (material very important) details on Youtube. Took about 10 db of low stuff out of the racket and saved marriage.
Lotsa Luck Eric

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of David Kuhn
Sent: Thursday, May 02, 2019 9:50 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Compressed air

" Your idea is correct, the large belt driven compressors are the best and places like Harbor Freight has them brand new for a reasonable price. "

Yea, I have been tempted a few times to use the 25% off coupon to get one, but I usually do not hear good things about there electrical tools.

There is an elderly lady down the block that we are friends with. Her husband (dead 20+ years now) has one of those six foot belt driver compressors near their garage door; I think it is hard wired. She might use it once a year. When I turned it on, it was amazingly not deafening.
It looks like it was built very well. I can't get her to give it or sell it to me - lol. I kind of pine for it. It is very old, but still works great and I am sure built better than anything harbor freight has. Anyway, I'm not sure I should offer much because of its age and I might be better off with a new one. They probably all need the pressure/electric switch changed every few years and I am not sure where to get that part. My original one in the dog house, probably 29 years old now and still looking nice, needs that pressure switch. I could never find the MFG parts list and you wouldn't get one from them after all these years. I haven't found generic ones either. Maybe there is generic kits to re-plumb old air compressors? I'll have to look.

Sorry, this is off topic, but I feel every electronics repair lab should have compress air. Heck where I worked, before GE moved everything, and our jobs overseas, I used a nice high pressure air line. I could wash boards off with Simple green and then ISO and blow dry them do dry that I could power them up right away without letting them dry overnight. The air sound drove other around me nuts, but you do what you have to do. At one point, maintenance was going to change my compressed air plumbing to the nitrogen line (we had a huge nitrogen tank outside) for the drying of boards, then our closing was announce and no one gave a shite about anything for the next year and a half 8-(. So nitrogen would be better for drying and dusting board than compressed air, but I would not want to foot that bill.

Dave

Dave

On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 11:48 AM Tony Fleming <czecht@gmail.com> wrote:

Your idea is correct, the large belt driven compressors are the best
and places like Harbor Freight has them brand new for a reasonable price.
Don't forget the water filtration and drain the water from the tank.
You could make a "self draining" or "automatic" condensation purge
with an Arduino or ESP32/ESP8266 and few more parts to open valve.
But a reminder once a month should give you time to check the system
and drain the water from the tank.


On Thu, May 2, 2019 at 10:24 AM David Kuhn <Daveyk021@gmail.com> wrote:

" Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor. "

That's the biggest problem. In the garage, I built a compressor dog
house
with six inch walls with insulation on all side. Even the access
door is
6" thick with insulation. It worked great, but the air compressor
got
used hard. Well know the saying "out of sight, out of mind"?
That's the problem. It never got maintenance. Now, I just let it
be noisy in the garage as needed. I don't use it that much, so I
just go out and turn it on as-needed rather than let it be
automatic. I would like to have a
huge
tall tank that hold a lot of air; but they can be expensive. I need
to
go
to some auctions and find a six foot tall belt driven compressor
that can run only every so often and let it on automatic.


On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 9:59 PM Harvey White <madyn@dragonworks.info>
wrote:

On Wed, 1 May 2019 14:53:04 +0200, you wrote:

I hear conflicting reports on what one should do. What's your take?
Are there different types where you should or shouldn't?
Compressed air isn't. There's not enough room in the an.


Druckluft 67 (aka Dust Off 67) from Kontakt / CRC says not to
shake the can "or otherwise the fluid might come out", but is it
always the case with all types? What is that fluid for, anyways?
The fluid evaporates, produces gas, and that's what your
"compressed air" happens to be.



I read reviews of some cheaper compressed air products on amazon
and they complained about the quality. What can go wrong with
compressed air?
Liquid for one, which you don't want, and then again, what's the
liquid that's evaporating to give you this "air"?

Two things people brought up were one brand produced very weak
pressure, and another produced flammable rather than inert gas.
Depends on what's evaporating. Butane would work, so would freon,
so would a lot of other things, includin propane.

Druckluft 67 touts as being oil free. Are there other things that
might go wrong?
er..... what's in that liquid?


Why would someone use canned compressed air rather than an air
compressor?

Because they don't have an air compressor. Because they don't
know the difference. Because they don't have a "quiet" air compressor.
Because they don't have the driers and particle filters to clean
up the output air from the compressor (which may or may not have
oil in it from the air pump).

Harvey


Thanks.










Jim Strohm
 

Add to the list of resources -- scuba air. If you're a certified scuba
diver, you can get your tank filled for a few bucks at any scuba shop.
Used tanks are relatively plentiful and cheap, but know that they require
annual inspections and a great many of the older aluminum tanks have a
limited number of fill cycles before the necks start to crack.

They won't blow up, they just won't hold air and if they start to develop
cracks, no shop will fill them.

73
Jim N6OTQ