Topics

Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery

Craig Cramb
 

Anyone had to locate replacement batteries for this unit. Only marking on the battery is 1A.
Original Tektronix description is: 1.5V, 650MAH, Alkaline-Manganese Dioxide
Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery
Pictures on link with dimensions required.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=76872

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

I have two of these. The batteries are used for is to provide a DC offset "bucking voltage" of 0.3V
via a resistor network and adjustable resistors R8/R9 that sets zero output at 1.2V p-p.

If R10/R11, which are usually 120k at 1.5V are increased to 348k then the common 3V tagged cells could
be used with the same sensitivity of adjustment of R8/R9.

Having just worked that out, I've just worked out how to resurrect my own!

Just need to find a suitable tagged 3V battery that can take 7.5uA draw 24/7.

Craig

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Craig Cramb
Sent: 26 October 2018 03:52
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery

Anyone had to locate replacement batteries for this unit. Only marking on the battery is 1A.
Original Tektronix description is: 1.5V, 650MAH, Alkaline-Manganese Dioxide Tektronix 067-0625-00
Peak to Peak Detector Battery Pictures on link with dimensions required.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=76872

Kerry Burns
 

Hello Craig

I've recently had to replace the original 1.35v mercury batteries in my 067-0625-00. I used 1.5v alkaline A1PX-BP1 batteries. Readily available and they are an exact fit - but you do need to have the battery supplier spot weld tags on to them for soldering. I got mine from my local 'Battery World' store, but you can get them from various online suppliers, such as 'Battery Direct' (https://www.batteriesdirect.com.au/shop/product/12224/a1px-bp1.html).

I've put two photos of my device with the new batteries ( both wrapped in black tape to reduce the chance of shorting) in the album 'Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery'. I also had to replace the 50ohm input resistor in mine as a previous owner had broken this trying to remove the RF input section (contrary to the instructions in the manual).

Mine seems to work OK now, but I haven't yet checked it right out to 500 MHz.

Kerry

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

That is really neat! Apparently available in Australia and NZ. But so far no luck finding in the UK or
Europe.

I'll try out my solution and report back what the result is.

Craig

Hello Craig

I've recently had to replace the original 1.35v mercury batteries in my 067-0625-00. I used 1.5v
alkaline
A1PX-BP1 batteries. Readily available and they are an exact fit - but you do need to have the
battery
supplier spot weld tags on to them for soldering. I got mine from my local 'Battery World' store,
but
you can get them from various online suppliers, such as 'Battery Direct'
(https://www.batteriesdirect.com.au/shop/product/12224/a1px-bp1.html).

I've put two photos of my device with the new batteries ( both wrapped in black tape to reduce the
chance of shorting) in the album 'Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery'. I also
had to
replace the 50ohm input resistor in mine as a previous owner had broken this trying to remove the RF
input section (contrary to the instructions in the manual).

Mine seems to work OK now, but I haven't yet checked it right out to 500 MHz.

Kerry

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

OK - the correct physical size is 1/3 AA. Although tagged batteries of that size are available, they
all seem to be rechargeable 1.2V.

But, the physically smaller 1/3 N (11.6mm dia, 10.8mm long) at 3V and solder tags is Varta
https://uk.farnell.com/varta/6131201501/battery-lithium-cr1-3n-170mah/dp/1781983

At 170mAh that should give about three years life at 7.5uA drawn. That is about half that of the
original battery, which should have given 7-8 years' service (although Tek suggested that they be
replaced yearly).

Craig

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Craig Cramb
Sent: 26 October 2018 03:52
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery

Anyone had to locate replacement batteries for this unit. Only marking on the battery is 1A.
Original Tektronix description is: 1.5V, 650MAH, Alkaline-Manganese Dioxide Tektronix 067-0625-00
Peak to Peak Detector Battery Pictures on link with dimensions required.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=76872

Craig Cramb
 

Thank you Craig and Kerry,
I see that this battery setup isn't an easy solution to just go and buy the replacement. Seems Kerry has been thru this himself. Let me know how your result works out. I will keep looking for the battery that Kerry is advising but prefer to locate in the US.

I've recently had to replace the original 1.35v mercury batteries in my 067-0625-00. I used 1.5v alkaline A1PX-BP1 batteries. Readily available and they are an exact fit - but you do need to have the battery supplier spot weld tags on to them for soldering.

battyhugh
 

In case anyone wasn't aware - soldering stainless steel is very easy - you need a (small) drop of 20% orthophosphoric acid. Solders instantly (so you don't heat the battery) - wipe it off when you have finished.
You don't need to tab.
Hugh.

Chuck Harris
 

You cannot heat the button on a SS battery case to soldering
temperature without melting, and damaging the internal seal.

Spot welding is the only way that is safe for the cell.

Send me the cell, and return postage, and I would gladly do
the job for anyone that needs it done.

-Chuck Harris

battyhugh wrote:

In case anyone wasn't aware - soldering stainless steel is very easy - you need a
(small) drop of 20% orthophosphoric acid. Solders instantly (so you don't heat the
battery) - wipe it off when you have finished.
You don't need to tab.
Hugh.



 

Use the rust remover liquid (dilute HCL) found in hardwares as the flux. Then u can direct solder onto batteries with low heat in about 3 or 4 seconds. No spot welding needed.

Chuck Harris
 

I used to think that, and had a nice temperature
controlled iron with lots of mass. It would solder
in less than 1 second start to finish. But every single
time I did it, the cell whose "+" terminal I soldered
would leak electrolyte through that seal some time down the
road. It even happens sometimes when you use a spot welder
on cells where you spot weld on a heavy tab, such as a
terminal on a cordless tool pack. I always would find
those cells to leak when I rebuilt dead packs.

-Chuck Harris

Ancel wrote:

Use the rust remover liquid (dilute HCL) found in hardwares as the flux. Then u can direct solder onto batteries with low heat in about 3 or 4 seconds. No spot welding needed.



battyhugh
 

Surprisingly no ... I have used this technique even with 312 cells (for radiotracking critters) - critical issues - hot enough and well tinned iron, 22g cored solder and quench it immediately with a wet tissue or cloth. Pays practicing on some old cells.

 

I have soldered and NOT spot welded on the specialty Tadiran cells to keep the RAM alive in the 2465A....that's since 2013 and 5 years running .....solder with the rust remover flux, applied with a wooden toothpick.
I use a 260 C temperature controlled station and it the 63/37 solder wets almost instantly. The cells were an odd size and were cylindrical. Something like a N cell, but wider diameter. Re-flowed with thin gauge copper to make the connections.
Mounted it with hot glue.
Kester SN63Pb37, type 44, 3.3%, Rosin core, 0.8mm , ANSI J STD 006C is my effective solder.

battyhugh
 

I tend to avoid using hydrochloric acid on things electronic - as it's incredibly corrosive - unless you wash everything off and dry thoroughly. It's great for rejuvenating ironware such as files (full strength) or things like corroded battery contacts.- wash and oil immediately after. Just rejuvenated a collection of jeweller's files. Phosphoric acid is far less volatile so doesn't cause collateral damage- so more appropriate for electronic applications.

Chuck Harris
 

The lithium cells have an entirely different seal
structure than do alkaline and nicad/mh cells.

In the NiMH/CD cells, and the alkaline cells, the
positive electrode is part of the seal/gas vent.
The plastic used in the seal is soft and melts well
below soldering temperature.

Because it would be a catastrophe if any moisture
got into a lithium cell (including the moisture in the
air), they have a seal that must never pass anything
in or out, and is quite remote of the exterior
terminals. In the case of consumer grade liION cells
(1650, 1850, ...), there is actually a FET switch and
fuse between the internel cell and the "+" terminal,
put there to protect the cell from conditions that might
cause the cell to detonate.

Lithium cells use plastic in their cell structure,
so heating the whole cell to above 140F can result in
a spectacular display, in the case of the lithium ion
type... not so much for the tadrian primary cells.

From a manufacturing point of view, it would be cheaper,
quicker, and easier to solder the cells. They would
do it for the same reason you want to do it: No desire
to buy/build/maintain an expensive CD welding system.

They don't, and can't, because the cost of making the
cells withstand the soldering operation greatly exceeds
the cost of requiring everyone use a CD welder.

I will again extend my offer. I will gladly weld tabs
on anyone's cell if they send it to me with return
postage. I have the equipment, bought for a government
battery charger research job, but now it mostly sits idle.

One or two cells, is free. If you need something more
extensive, we can talk.

-Chuck Harris

Ancel wrote:

I have soldered and NOT spot welded on the specialty Tadiran cells to keep the RAM alive in the 2465A....that's since 2013 and 5 years running .....solder with the rust remover flux, applied with a wooden toothpick.
I use a 260 C temperature controlled station and it the 63/37 solder wets almost instantly. The cells were an odd size and were cylindrical. Something like a N cell, but wider diameter. Re-flowed with thin gauge copper to make the connections.
Mounted it with hot glue.
Kester SN63Pb37, type 44, 3.3%, Rosin core, 0.8mm , ANSI J STD 006C is my effective solder.

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

OK - I tried this. The Varta 3V batteries have welded on tabs normally for PCB mounting for memory
battery backup. But if these are bent at right angles they solder right in.

Now the new voltage of these is just over 3.2V, so R10/11 had to be increased from 120k to 390k.
(Calculation based on 3V was 348k)

And the unit works perfectly. It confirms that my SG503 is well within specification.

Craig

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Craig Sawyers
Sent: 26 October 2018 09:53
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery

OK - the correct physical size is 1/3 AA. Although tagged batteries of that size are available,
they all
seem to be rechargeable 1.2V.

But, the physically smaller 1/3 N (11.6mm dia, 10.8mm long) at 3V and solder tags is Varta
https://uk.farnell.com/varta/6131201501/battery-lithium-cr1-3n-170mah/dp/1781983

At 170mAh that should give about three years life at 7.5uA drawn. That is about half that of the
original
battery, which should have given 7-8 years' service (although Tek suggested that they be replaced
yearly).

Craig

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
Craig Cramb
Sent: 26 October 2018 03:52
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: [TekScopes] Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector
Battery

Anyone had to locate replacement batteries for this unit. Only marking on the battery is 1A.
Original Tektronix description is: 1.5V, 650MAH, Alkaline-Manganese
Dioxide Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery Pictures on link with dimensions
required.

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=76872



Craig Cramb
 

Craig,
Thanks for working on this and the results you got can be used. Sourcing the original batteries at the correct voltage wasn’t easy but I got some 1.5v. And they did fit well. But after getting them installed I found that the unit was non-functioning. I did work on trying to get a good result which I didn’t. So I returned the unit to the Ebay seller. I’m really struggling to get some functional calibration tools. I spend a fair amount of time working on the oscilloscopes. Then I get stuck trying to figure out how to correct calibration tools. Well anyway I’ll keep looking for the Working Tools then tune them as needed. I’m sure there are lots of these items lost in work shops never to be used again.

Craig C

On Oct 31, 2018, at 3:20 AM, Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...> wrote:

Now the new voltage of these is just over 3.2V, so R10/11 had to be increased from 120k to 390k.
(Calculation based on 3V was 348k)

And the unit works perfectly. It confirms that my SG503 is well within specification.

Craig

Kerry Burns
 

Hello Craig

I had a similar experience with the 067-0625-00. Put in the 1.5V batteries, but the unit wouldn't work. I found that the 50ohm input resistor was broken - probably because someone had removed the the RF end section of the device while replacing the batteries at some point. Replacing the resistor was not that hard although a bit awkward. Although the device now works, I haven't as yet been able to check its performance out to the 500Mhz limit.

Kerry

Harvey White
 

On Wed, 31 Oct 2018 19:14:46 -0500, you wrote:

Craig,
Thanks for working on this and the results you got can be used. Sourcing the original batteries at the correct voltage wasn’t easy but I got some 1.5v. And they did fit well. But after getting them installed I found that the unit was non-functioning. I did work on trying to get a good result which I didn’t. So I returned the unit to the Ebay seller. I’m really struggling to get some functional calibration tools. I spend a fair amount of time working on the oscilloscopes. Then I get stuck trying to figure out how to correct calibration tools. Well anyway I’ll keep looking for the Working Tools then tune them as needed. I’m sure there are lots of these items lost in work shops never to be used again.
If you wish to go the way Tektronix did, then the TG501, PG506, SG503
and SG504 (latter two depend on frequency range of the scope you're
testing) along with a TM506 are what they'd recommend for performance
testing and calibration. With a TM5006, you could go with the above
or one of the CG5000 series. Be aware that the CG5000 series needs a
leveling head that is generally removed before sale. (it's a wire,
why'd you need that?) ((because it has stuff attached to it that the
gadget needs?))

If you have multiple 7000 series scopes, then you may want some of the
input standardizers, pick one that goes with the bandwidth of your
scope if possible.

Harvey




Craig C
On Oct 31, 2018, at 3:20 AM, Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...> wrote:

Now the new voltage of these is just over 3.2V, so R10/11 had to be increased from 120k to 390k.
(Calculation based on 3V was 348k)

And the unit works perfectly. It confirms that my SG503 is well within specification.

Craig

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

Be aware that the CG5000
series needs a leveling head that is generally removed before sale. (it's a wire, why'd you need
that?)
((because it has stuff attached to it that the gadget needs?))
What receivers do when a company goes bust is make a pile of electronics to sell, and put all cables
or anything that looks like a cable, in a large bin and sell that as a single lot.

Since a (detachable) levelling head looks like a cable, into the bin it goes. So just about every
SG504 for sale anywhere is minus the levelling head. Hence Ancel's replacement head (and another
physical design that Dave Partridge did).

Earlier Tektronix levelled generators had a captive levelling head, so don't suffer the same fate.

Craig

 

and another physical design that Dave Partridge did
and I do still offer it. For details please refer to <
http://www.perdrix.co.uk/SG504Head/index.htm> where you'll find full details
of the design, construction and test results.

Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of Craig
Sawyers
Sent: 01 November 2018 07:10
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] Tektronix 067-0625-00 Peak to Peak Detector Battery

Be aware that the CG5000
series needs a leveling head that is generally removed before sale. (it's
a wire, why'd you need
that?)
((because it has stuff attached to it that the gadget needs?))
What receivers do when a company goes bust is make a pile of electronics to
sell, and put all cables
or anything that looks like a cable, in a large bin and sell that as a
single lot.

Since a (detachable) levelling head looks like a cable, into the bin it
goes. So just about every
SG504 for sale anywhere is minus the levelling head. Hence Ancel's
replacement head (and another
physical design that Dave Partridge did).

Earlier Tektronix levelled generators had a captive levelling head, so don't
suffer the same fate.

Craig