Topics

2465 Fan Collet Thingy


saipan59 (Pete)
 

Hi Ray,
I see the "Files" section in the menu on the left side of the page, when looking at this page:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/topics

Here's a link to the "collet" search, which then shows a PDF file:
https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/filessearch?q=collet

Pete


saipan59 (Pete)
 

And I would add for folks that are going to fabricate a piece: Don't overlook *wood* as a possible material. Wood comes in a zillion types (at a woodworker's supply store), and some types have very useful properties for "making stuff", while being easier to work with (perhaps) than metal or plastic.

Pete


Chuck Harris
 

Log onto your groups.io account. It should open with your "my groups" screen.
Click on "Tekscopes".

On the left side of the messages screen there is a list of areas associated
with tekscopes. One of them is marked "FILES".

-Chuck Harris

Raymond Cote wrote:

And just WHERE IS THE FILES SECTION???
I dont see any link to it. Never have
In matters of style, float with the current. In matters of Principle, stand like a rock. “. — Thomas Jefferson —

On Aug 8, 2020, at 06:55, Martin <@musaeum> wrote:

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 01:55 PM, DaveC wrote:
Can you please provide a link to he location of these files? I looked in the group files and there aren’t many. I didn’t see anything relating to a collet.
Hi Dave,

it was explained somewhere in this thread: go into the files section and search for "collet".

cheers
Martin





Li Gangyi
 

Very quickly drew up a STL for people who wanna try 3D printing the plastic
bit, I believe the original part has a metal stud for the nut to thread
onto, you're gonna have to drill and tap the center for a stud.
Do let me know if you've tested it out and if it works good.

I have access to a small lathe, however I'm not equipped to do slits as of
yet, if there is interest I might get around to adding that capability.

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 12:45 AM Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

Log onto your groups.io account. It should open with your "my groups"
screen.
Click on "Tekscopes".

On the left side of the messages screen there is a list of areas associated
with tekscopes. One of them is marked "FILES".

-Chuck Harris

Raymond Cote wrote:
And just WHERE IS THE FILES SECTION???
I dont see any link to it. Never have
In matters of style, float with the current. In matters of Principle,
stand like a rock. “. — Thomas Jefferson —

On Aug 8, 2020, at 06:55, Martin <@musaeum> wrote:

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 01:55 PM, DaveC wrote:
Can you please provide a link to he location of these files? I looked
in the group files and there aren’t many. I didn’t see anything relating to
a collet.

Hi Dave,

it was explained somewhere in this thread: go into the files section
and search for "collet".

cheers
Martin







Li Gangyi
 

Completely forgot the link, here it is.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4564817

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 1:24 AM Gangyi Li <li.gangyi@...> wrote:

Very quickly drew up a STL for people who wanna try 3D printing the
plastic bit, I believe the original part has a metal stud for the nut to
thread onto, you're gonna have to drill and tap the center for a stud.
Do let me know if you've tested it out and if it works good.

I have access to a small lathe, however I'm not equipped to do slits as of
yet, if there is interest I might get around to adding that capability.

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 12:45 AM Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

Log onto your groups.io account. It should open with your "my groups"
screen.
Click on "Tekscopes".

On the left side of the messages screen there is a list of areas
associated
with tekscopes. One of them is marked "FILES".

-Chuck Harris

Raymond Cote wrote:
And just WHERE IS THE FILES SECTION???
I dont see any link to it. Never have
In matters of style, float with the current. In matters of Principle,
stand like a rock. “. — Thomas Jefferson —

On Aug 8, 2020, at 06:55, Martin <@musaeum> wrote:

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 01:55 PM, DaveC wrote:
Can you please provide a link to he location of these files? I looked
in the group files and there aren’t many. I didn’t see anything relating to
a collet.

Hi Dave,

it was explained somewhere in this thread: go into the files section
and search for "collet".

cheers
Martin







 

Hi Li,

would it be possible to add a guidance hole for the insert? Like some 2mm diameter and 5mm deep...

It seems crucial the hole is drilled in the very middle of the piece for the fan not to wobble around. Without guidance that seems rather difficult to obtain.

cheers
Martin


Chuck Harris
 

The slits can be done with a hacksaw blade ground
down to a slightly thinner thickness.

-Chuck Harris

Li Gangyi wrote:

Very quickly drew up a STL for people who wanna try 3D printing the plastic
bit, I believe the original part has a metal stud for the nut to thread
onto, you're gonna have to drill and tap the center for a stud.
Do let me know if you've tested it out and if it works good.

I have access to a small lathe, however I'm not equipped to do slits as of
yet, if there is interest I might get around to adding that capability.


Li Gangyi
 

Done. There is now a pilot hole.

I tried test printing a few pieces. You'd have to orient the part sideways
instead of the usual top down orientation to avoid it splitting, at least
with PLA.

The problem with sideways orientation is the lousy surface finish and
dimensional tolerance on home 3d printers at least. I ran mine thru a lathe
with the part slightly oversized to get it looking good. Seems like a
usable part to me. (I don't own a 2465).

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020, 4:23 AM Martin <@musaeum> wrote:

Hi Li,

would it be possible to add a guidance hole for the insert? Like some 2mm
diameter and 5mm deep...

It seems crucial the hole is drilled in the very middle of the piece for
the fan not to wobble around. Without guidance that seems rather difficult
to obtain.

cheers
Martin





victor.silva
 

On Sun, Nov 10, 2019 at 01:46 PM, Siggi wrote:



I did machine a batch of these collets from delrin/acetal, and those will
work just fine - delrin will hold the thread just dandy. (I've been
shipping these out for postage, but I'm out of stock now - alas).

Siggi
Siggi,

Will you be having more produced? Depending on the cost I would like to have 10 or 20.
If you aren't about to order some, can you release the manufacturer of the Delrin collet to sell some to a third party?
I would place the group order myself.

Although I collaborated with Tom Jobe for the design of the Brass collet that led to the 2D in the files section,
I never liked the fact the initial samples were made of brass. Brass made the impeller much heavier than it needed to be
putting unnecessary stress on the motor bearings.

Thanks,
Victor


Tam Hanna
 

Hello,
I volunteer to print one, but do not have the scope. Physical location is Budapest, Hungary, Europe.

Tam
---
With best regards
Tam HANNA (emailing on a BlackBerry PRIV)

Enjoy electronics? Join 14k other followers by visiting the Crazy Electronics Lab at https://www.instagram.com/tam.hanna/


Li Gangyi
 

Just experimented a whole bunch more.

With a FDM printer and PLA material, ,vertical printing is tough, even with
the collet split 3 ways I have layer adhesion issues, perhaps a different
material might work (PLA has almost no give), horizontal printing will
sorta work, you'd have to sand / machine away the exterior (scale it a
little bigger for that), however there is no good way to put a thread on
there (I tried printing it with a 4mm shaft but trying to tap on that shaft
just shreds layers away). You'd have to use the model with a pilot hole,
drill it out and push in an insert with say a soldering iron.

I do have access to an SLA printer, but I've not set it up as of yet. Would
be interesting to know if I can just print the threads as is (no
machining). Update with results later probably.

One again the models I have created are over at

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4564817


EricJ
 

He probably made them himself. This part is so small I don't think the
weight will make a difference to the motor bearings. If nobody else has
time I could make some.

--Eric

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020, 9:32 AM victor.silva via groups.io <daejon1=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

On Sun, Nov 10, 2019 at 01:46 PM, Siggi wrote:



I did machine a batch of these collets from delrin/acetal, and those will
work just fine - delrin will hold the thread just dandy. (I've been
shipping these out for postage, but I'm out of stock now - alas).

Siggi
Siggi,

Will you be having more produced? Depending on the cost I would like to
have 10 or 20.
If you aren't about to order some, can you release the manufacturer of the
Delrin collet to sell some to a third party?
I would place the group order myself.

Although I collaborated with Tom Jobe for the design of the Brass collet
that led to the 2D in the files section,
I never liked the fact the initial samples were made of brass. Brass made
the impeller much heavier than it needed to be
putting unnecessary stress on the motor bearings.

Thanks,
Victor




Siggi
 

On Sun, Aug 9, 2020 at 6:40 PM EricJ via groups.io <wyzkydd2358=
yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

He probably made them himself. This part is so small I don't think the
weight will make a difference to the motor bearings. If nobody else has
time I could make some.
Yes, I turned these out of 1/2" Delrin rod, and then slit them on my mill.
All manual machining, so it's fairly labor intensive.


Dave Ahrendt
 

I do have two fdm printers but do not own a 2465 only a 2236. I assume that the threaded portion is 6-32 or is it metric (M3.5)?
I'm not sure what the threaded portion threads in to so how much torque is normally applied?
I've got some carbon infused PETG that I can try if anyone is interested.


Siggi
 

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 1:17 PM Dave Ahrendt <dave@...> wrote:

I do have two fdm printers but do not own a 2465 only a 2236. I assume
that the threaded portion is 6-32 or is it metric (M3.5)?
The threaded portion is 4-40, if I remember correctly.


I'm not sure what the threaded portion threads in to so how much torque is
normally applied?
The stud that threads into the collet is used on one hand to pull the
collet into the impeller, which clamps it to the motor shaft. This happens
when the 8-32 nut on the outside of the impeller is tightened, and I'd say
there's a fair bit of torque involved. On the other hand, the 4-40 thread
is used to eject the collet from the impeller when loosening it. This is
done by turning the stud with a flat-blade screwdriver, which pushes the
collet via the 4-40 threads.


n4buq
 

If I'm not mistaken, the end of the stud that goes into the collet is #4-40 and the other end that protrudes through the impeller is #6-32. The stud has a shoulder between the two threaded ends that bottoms out on the collet. The intent was for the user to loosen the nut and turn the stud CCW with the screwdriver slot which would force the shoulder against the inside of the impeller and push the collet free. Of course, if you try that these days, the plastic has gotten brittle and you're very likely to break things. As Chuck has iterated, best to loosen the nut and give the stud a gentle tap which will force it to open it without twisting it.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Siggi" <siggi@...>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Monday, August 10, 2020 12:28:55 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 1:17 PM Dave Ahrendt <dave@...> wrote:

I do have two fdm printers but do not own a 2465 only a 2236. I assume
that the threaded portion is 6-32 or is it metric (M3.5)?
The threaded portion is 4-40, if I remember correctly.


I'm not sure what the threaded portion threads in to so how much torque is
normally applied?
The stud that threads into the collet is used on one hand to pull the
collet into the impeller, which clamps it to the motor shaft. This happens
when the 8-32 nut on the outside of the impeller is tightened, and I'd say
there's a fair bit of torque involved. On the other hand, the 4-40 thread
is used to eject the collet from the impeller when loosening it. This is
done by turning the stud with a flat-blade screwdriver, which pushes the
collet via the 4-40 threads.




Li Gangyi
 

Setup my MSLA printer to give this another go, I have gotten the front flex bit useable, am still experimenting with attaching a stud on the other end to complete this. Getting there. I personally do not feel that the resin is strong enough to be threaded for a nut, which is why I'm going the stud route. Added picture of where I am at now on the thingiverse page.

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4564817


Michael W. Lynch
 

Good Job! The resin printer would seem to have the best chance of making a usable part. is it possible to add a good sized radius at the bottom of the stud? That sharp transition of the stud to the body will create a stress riser, which the radius will eliminate.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR


n4buq
 

If the resin isn't strong enough for a threaded stud, then perhaps just leaving a hole suitable to tap to #6-32 and a short section of threaded rod would work better. It may not be as strong as an embedded metal insert but would probably be strong enough to close the collet without stripping the threads.

Thanks,
Barry - N4BUQ

----- Original Message -----
From: "Michael W. Lynch via groups.io" <mlynch003=yahoo.com@groups.io>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 3:54:37 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] 2465 Fan Collet Thingy

Good Job! The resin printer would seem to have the best chance of making a
usable part. is it possible to add a good sized radius at the bottom of the
stud? That sharp transition of the stud to the body will create a stress
riser, which the radius will eliminate.

--
Michael Lynch
Dardanelle, AR




SCMenasian
 

A bit of background. I am not a 3D printer guy. If I were making this part, I would machine
it with a lathe and a milling machine. Also, I might make it entirely out of metal, depending upon the ultimate application. That having been said - If I were making t out of plastic, I would consider tapping a 6-32 hole at the stud end and epoxying in a metal stud ( sawed off piece
of a machine screw). This should end up much stronger than an all plastic part. The epoxy would ensure strength and reliability and guard against unscrewing.