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How old?


Brian Cockburn
 

Given a model number and a serial number is there a way to look up or estimate the time of manufacture?

Thanks, Brian.


ArtekManuals
 

Brian

Not really ...Tek serial numbers have nothing to do with time

Only way that gets you close is looking at date codes on caps and IC's

-DC
manuals@...

On 5/3/2018 9:21 PM, Brian Cockburn wrote:
Given a model number and a serial number is there a way to look up or estimate the time of manufacture?

Thanks, Brian.

--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com


Pete Lancashire
 

It would be quite the surprise if somebody found the records for serial
number release from manufacturing. To make matters worse when Tek started
to divisionalize many did it their own way. I Can Only Image the Holy Grail
being corporate records in customer service.

In other words don't hold your breath

-pete

On Thu, May 3, 2018, 6:40 PM Artekmedia <manuals@...> wrote:

Brian

Not really ...Tek serial numbers have nothing to do with time

Only way that gets you close is looking at date codes on caps and IC's

-DC
manuals@...

On 5/3/2018 9:21 PM, Brian Cockburn wrote:
Given a model number and a serial number is there a way to look up or
estimate the time of manufacture?

Thanks, Brian.

--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com






 

If the unit has a cooling fan, there is often a date stamped (in ink) on them. I had to replace the fan in my 545B, and once out of the case, I was able to see the date as 1968. The stamping on the aforementioned fan motor was located on the laminated iron core.

On 5/3/2018 10:21 PM, Pete Lancashire wrote:
It would be quite the surprise if somebody found the records for serial
number release from manufacturing. To make matters worse when Tek started
to divisionalize many did it their own way. I Can Only Image the Holy Grail
being corporate records in customer service.

In other words don't hold your breath

-pete

On Thu, May 3, 2018, 6:40 PM Artekmedia <manuals@...> wrote:

Brian

Not really ...Tek serial numbers have nothing to do with time

Only way that gets you close is looking at date codes on caps and IC's

-DC
manuals@...

On 5/3/2018 9:21 PM, Brian Cockburn wrote:
Given a model number and a serial number is there a way to look up or
estimate the time of manufacture?
Thanks, Brian.

--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com






 

Given a model number and a serial number is there a way to look up or estimate the time of manufacture?
You can try this:
https://www.tek.com/mytek_support_status

David Garrido found this. Works with the TDS scopes. Don't know how far back it goes...

Jay


Brian Cockburn
 

Thanks Jay,

Sadly no 'Ship Date' for my 2245A.

Brian.


Mlynch001
 

On Fri, May 4, 2018 at 05:13 am, Brian Cockburn wrote:


Thanks Jay,

Sadly no 'Ship Date' for my 2245A.

Brian.
I recently worked on a T922 and it actually had a date hand written inside the case in "Oct 20 1978", not sure if this was standard practice or not. My TDS460 had several date stamps on various components, including the CRT and mains transformer.


Brian Cockburn
 

Next time I have it apart I'll check all to obvious (and non-obvious) places for date codes. I'm sure that there'll be loads of chips with date codes. The youngest chip sets the limit on the maximum age, barring replacement - but the soldering would give that away.


Brian Cockburn
 

Artekmedia, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "serial numbers have nothing to do with time". Are serial numbers not monotonically increasing? And I've always assumed that each model has its own serial number sequence, rather than there being one Tek-wide serial number sequence. Does anyone know definitively one way or the other?


Chuck Harris
 

If you search the group, there was a post by a former
tektronix line manager that explained why the numbers
cannot readily be used for estimating quantities of an
instrument made, or as indicators of age.

In brief, the number sequences made whole jumps when the
production line was restarted after a significant pause,
or a change in the design. The instruments made during
a production run, could be sold over multiple years if
they over built, or there could be multiple runs in a
year, if there was great demand.

About all that could be said is the production in a
group of instruments was monotonically increasing, and
that the production managers at one point had logs of
which groups were made on which dates, but they don't
appear to have been saved, as they weren't very important
long term.

-Chuck Harris

Brian Cockburn wrote:

Artekmedia, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "serial numbers have nothing to do with time". Are serial numbers not monotonically increasing? And I've always assumed that each model has its own serial number sequence, rather than there being one Tek-wide serial number sequence. Does anyone know definitively one way or the other?




Pete Lancashire
 

Are serial numbers not monotonically increasing?

yes see below

And I've always assumed that each model has its own serial number
sequence, rather than there being one Tek-wide serial number sequence.

wrong, see below.


Let me try.

Other than rare occasions Tek when the adopted the "six digit" serial
number system it went like this

The letter identified the manufacturing location. The number 0 - Zero was
also used.

the next two digits were for design changes during the manufacturing life
of the product, the digits started at 101.

the remaining four digits where starting at 0001 the build sequence number.

So far example the first 7704 of the line at Beaverton would have the
serial number B010101.

An exception is when a design change was major. There the serial numbers my
go from B041234 to B050101.

I think the 465 did this, but don't hold me to it.

In these cases a new service manual was produced.

Hence if you have in front of you two 7704's and one is B021234 and the
other is B071514, the only thing you
can say is the on with serial number B071514 was built after the other one.



Many years ago I posted the complete list of sites codes etc, but others
may have it now.

-pete



On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 7:43 AM, Brian Cockburn <
brian.cockburn.1959@...> wrote:

Artekmedia, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "serial numbers
have nothing to do with time". Are serial numbers not monotonically
increasing? And I've always assumed that each model has its own serial
number sequence, rather than there being one Tek-wide serial number
sequence. Does anyone know definitively one way or the other?




Richard Solomon <dickw1ksz@...>
 

Ask any Collins Collector !!

73, Dick, W1KSZ

On Wed, May 9, 2018, 7:43 AM Brian Cockburn <brian.cockburn.1959@...>
wrote:

Artekmedia, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "serial numbers
have nothing to do with time". Are serial numbers not monotonically
increasing? And I've always assumed that each model has its own serial
number sequence, rather than there being one Tek-wide serial number
sequence. Does anyone know definitively one way or the other?




Pete Lancashire
 

The most complete list of instrument / serial number / dates I say when I
was at Tek was in possession of customer service.

It was updated daily and was on green-bar, later one could get the same
information on a 3270 terminal.

One use of that information was to determine if a item was still within the
warranty period

In fact looking back I used CS's database at times when I worked in
component engineering then I did corp's systems

Only if I had kept a few of those 9 track 1/2 inch tapes !!

-pete

On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 8:01 AM, Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

If you search the group, there was a post by a former
tektronix line manager that explained why the numbers
cannot readily be used for estimating quantities of an
instrument made, or as indicators of age.

In brief, the number sequences made whole jumps when the
production line was restarted after a significant pause,
or a change in the design. The instruments made during
a production run, could be sold over multiple years if
they over built, or there could be multiple runs in a
year, if there was great demand.

About all that could be said is the production in a
group of instruments was monotonically increasing, and
that the production managers at one point had logs of
which groups were made on which dates, but they don't
appear to have been saved, as they weren't very important
long term.

-Chuck Harris

Brian Cockburn wrote:
Artekmedia, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "serial numbers
have nothing to do with time". Are serial numbers not monotonically
increasing? And I've always assumed that each model has its own serial
number sequence, rather than there being one Tek-wide serial number
sequence. Does anyone know definitively one way or the other?






ArtekManuals
 

Yes increasing but not necessarily continuous and never tied to any particular date code that you can determine with your secret Tektronix Decoder Ring

-DC
manuals@...

On 5/9/2018 11:39 AM, Pete Lancashire wrote:
Are serial numbers not monotonically increasing?

yes see below

And I've always assumed that each model has its own serial number
sequence, rather than there being one Tek-wide serial number sequence.

wrong, see below.


Let me try.

Other than rare occasions Tek when the adopted the "six digit" serial
number system it went like this

The letter identified the manufacturing location. The number 0 - Zero was
also used.

the next two digits were for design changes during the manufacturing life
of the product, the digits started at 101.

the remaining four digits where starting at 0001 the build sequence number.

So far example the first 7704 of the line at Beaverton would have the
serial number B010101.

An exception is when a design change was major. There the serial numbers my
go from B041234 to B050101.

I think the 465 did this, but don't hold me to it.

In these cases a new service manual was produced.

Hence if you have in front of you two 7704's and one is B021234 and the
other is B071514, the only thing you
can say is the on with serial number B071514 was built after the other one.



Many years ago I posted the complete list of sites codes etc, but others
may have it now.

-pete



On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 7:43 AM, Brian Cockburn <
brian.cockburn.1959@...> wrote:

Artekmedia, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "serial numbers
have nothing to do with time". Are serial numbers not monotonically
increasing? And I've always assumed that each model has its own serial
number sequence, rather than there being one Tek-wide serial number
sequence. Does anyone know definitively one way or the other?



--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com


ArtekManuals
 

Brian

Chuck Harris' email reply took the words right out of my mouth

Tek serial numbers  have nothing to do with an actual  manufacturing date and not always continuous over m
long periods of time.

For those of you who are just tuning in, Since Brian didn't include the prior posts and are wondering what all this is about I have included them below for calcification and continuity

_*
*__*PRIOR POSTS*_

On 5/3/2018 9:21 PM, Brian Cockburn wrote:
Given a model number and a serial number is there a way to look up or estimate the time of manufacture?

Thanks, Brian.

ArtekMedia Replied:

Brian

Not really ...Tek serial numbers have nothing to do with time

Only way that gets you close is looking at date codes on caps and IC's

-DC
manuals@...

--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com


ArtekManuals
 

Pete
If you had kept those tapes you would likely have a box full of brown dust today :-)
\-DC

On 5/9/2018 11:44 AM, Pete Lancashire wrote:

In fact looking back I used CS's database at times when I worked in
component engineering then I did corp's systems

Only if I had kept a few of those 9 track 1/2 inch tapes !!

-pete



On Wed, May 9, 2018 at 8:01 AM, Chuck Harris <cfharris@...> wrote:

If you search the group, there was a post by a former
tektronix line manager that explained why the numbers
cannot readily be used for estimating quantities of an
instrument made, or as indicators of age.

In brief, the number sequences made whole jumps when the
production line was restarted after a significant pause,
or a change in the design. The instruments made during
a production run, could be sold over multiple years if
they over built, or there could be multiple runs in a
year, if there was great demand.

About all that could be said is the production in a
group of instruments was monotonically increasing, and
that the production managers at one point had logs of
which groups were made on which dates, but they don't
appear to have been saved, as they weren't very important
long term.

-Chuck Harris

Brian Cockburn wrote:
Artekmedia, I'm not sure I understand what you mean by "serial numbers
have nothing to do with time". Are serial numbers not monotonically
increasing? And I've always assumed that each model has its own serial
number sequence, rather than there being one Tek-wide serial number
sequence. Does anyone know definitively one way or the other?



--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com