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New acquisition: Soviet 7000-series copies

cmjones01
 

Just yesterday I picked up the latest addition to my Tek-related collection of equipment: an actual example of the Soviet-era Tek 7000 series copies. These come up for sale from time to time in central and eastern Europe, but they're often in very poor condition or are missing plugins. I snapped this one up because it's in great shape (all the plugins still have their factory seals intact) and it has an interesting selection of plugins.

The haul includes:
C1-122 (S1-122) mainframe
Ya4S-89 pulse generator
Ya4S-90 dual trace vertical (x2)
Ya4S-91 dual timebase
Ya4S-97 multimeter
Ya4S-100 dual trace sampling vertical
Ya4S-101 sampling timebase
Ya4S-102 dual delay line
2K11 calibration plugin

So far I've only had time for the briefest of tests, but the mainframe basically works, with readouts on the screen, and I have managed to get a trace out of it. I'm looking forward to experimenting and documenting it in more detail on TekWiki. It's like familiar technology but from a parallel universe!

One thing I really want is the sampling head to go with the Ya4S-100 plugin. The seller is hunting around to see if he's got it anywhere, and I'll keep looking, but otherwise it might be a case of improvising with a 'western' sampling head to get it working.

Chris

Craig Sawyers <c.sawyers@...>
 

Just yesterday I picked up the latest addition to my Tek-related collection of equipment: an actual
example of the Soviet-era Tek 7000 series copies. These come up for sale from time to time in
central
and eastern Europe, but they're often in very poor condition or are missing plugins. I snapped this
one
up because it's in great shape (all the plugins still have their factory seals intact) and it has an
interesting selection of plugins.
That sounds awesome - download some pics please!

Craig

Roger Evans
 

Fascinating find, is the pulse generator intended to go with the sampling units? It would be interesting to find out what sort of performance the Soviets were achieving.

Regards,

Roger

cmjones01
 

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 02:45 am, Craig Sawyers wrote:
Just yesterday I picked up the latest addition to my Tek-related collection
of equipment: an actual
example of the Soviet-era Tek 7000 series copies. These come up for sale
from time to time in
central
and eastern Europe, but they're often in very poor condition or are missing
plugins. I snapped this
one
up because it's in great shape (all the plugins still have their factory
seals intact) and it has an
interesting selection of plugins.
That sounds awesome - download some pics please!
Will do, when I get a chance.

Chris

cmjones01
 

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 03:40 am, Roger Evans wrote:
Fascinating find, is the pulse generator intended to go with the sampling
units? It would be interesting to find out what sort of performance the
Soviets were achieving.
Yes, it is, as far as I can see. Having spent a few minutes playing around with it, it seems that the sampling timebase has no ability to free-run or obtain an internal trigger signal. It needs an external trigger, which is provided by the pulse generator (or, I guess, the trigger output of the delay line if you're observing an external signal). The only way I could get a trace out of the sampling timebase was to connect the trigger output of the pulse generator to its trigger input. Then both repetitive sweep and manual/external scan work fine. The sampling vertical plugin appears to do sensible things, too, so I'm really itching to get my hands on the sampling head.

I'll have a look at the risetime of the pulse generator too. It may be a useful tool in its own right!

The standard timebase doesn't seem to be quite working properly. It will only sweep in response to each press of the single-sweep-reset button, though it does trigger correctly each time. It's as if it's getting stuck in the holdoff state. The sweep is offset to the left, too. I'll do the usual edge-connector-cleaning routine and see if that helps, otherwise it's time to break the factory seals, which is a shame. However, I've already spotted a couple of tunnel diodes visible through the perforated side panels :-)

Chris

cmjones01
 

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 02:45 am, Craig Sawyers wrote:

Just yesterday I picked up the latest addition to my Tek-related collection
of equipment: an actual
example of the Soviet-era Tek 7000 series copies. These come up for sale
from time to time in
central
and eastern Europe, but they're often in very poor condition or are missing
plugins. I snapped this
one
up because it's in great shape (all the plugins still have their factory
seals intact) and it has an
interesting selection of plugins.
That sounds awesome - download some pics please!
I've put a couple of quick photos of the ensemble on the workshop floor into the album "Soviet 7000-series copies":

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=46228

I'll add more when I've had time to take better ones. The sharp-eyed will spot that the pulse generator plugin is upside down. I wasn't looking too carefully when I stacked them!

Chris

stefan_trethan
 

Interesting that the MF and installed plugins are german while the
others have cyrillic writing.
I can already see one thing that the Russians improved: the latch won't break.
But how come one of them doesn't have a latch?

Looking forward to the non-potato pictures.

ST

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 5:57 PM, cmjones01 <chris@...> wrote:


I've put a couple of quick photos of the ensemble on the workshop floor into the album "Soviet 7000-series copies":

https://groups.io/g/TekScopes/album?id=46228

I'll add more when I've had time to take better ones. The sharp-eyed will spot that the pulse generator plugin is upside down. I wasn't looking too carefully when I stacked them!

Chris

cmjones01
 

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 10:07 am, stefan_trethan wrote:
Interesting that the MF and installed plugins are german while the
others have cyrillic writing.
Yes. I've seen pictures of them with both German and Russian labelling, but no other languages, even here in Poland. I have some German-language instruction manuals which have pencil annotations in Polish.

I can already see one thing that the Russians improved: the latch won't break.
Having played with the plugins a bit, there's another reason for that: the edge connector is a somewhat finer pitch than the Tek one (has more contacts) and so alignment seems more critical. Even slight movements of the plugin make the readout go crazy. The mechanical tolerances seem a little more generous, such that it's sometimes necessary to loosen one plugin to get another in next door to it, so everything shuffles around a bit until the screws are tightened.

But how come one of them doesn't have a latch?
That's the delay line which, analogous to the Tek 7M11, is entirely passive (has no edge connector or other connection to the mainframe). It's also incredibly heavy, presumably being full of hardline coax. Maybe they intended it to be mostly used outside the mainframe. If fitted in the mainframe, however, there's a real risk of it falling out and injuring someone's foot!

Looking forward to the non-potato pictures.
:-)

Chris

cmjones01
 

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 10:07 am, stefan_trethan wrote:
Looking forward to the non-potato pictures.
I've started adding some pictures and description to TekWiki. They're a bit rough and ready at the moment and I've only done the mainframe and one plugin, but you can see the results here:

http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/%D0%A11-122
http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/%D0%AF4%D0%A1-89

I'll keep adding more as I get time to work on it.

Chris

ykochcal
 

Now your just teasing us, what's under that cover of that plugin?????

But really, thanks for your work posting, these are very interesting

John

-----Original Message-----
From: TekScopes@groups.io [mailto:TekScopes@groups.io] On Behalf Of
cmjones01
Sent: Thursday, May 03, 2018 8:03 AM
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] New acquisition: Soviet 7000-series copies

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 10:07 am, stefan_trethan wrote:
Looking forward to the non-potato pictures.
I've started adding some pictures and description to TekWiki. They're a bit
rough and ready at the moment and I've only done the mainframe and one
plugin, but you can see the results here:

http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/%D0%A11-122
http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/%D0%AF4%D0%A1-89

I'll keep adding more as I get time to work on it.

Chris

ArtekManuals
 

I'll give them one thing at least they have what appears to be a simple and probably rugged screw lock for holding plug-ins in vs Tek's "pull-tab" approach :-P

-DC
manuals@...

I've started adding some pictures and description to TekWiki. They're a bit
rough and ready at the moment and I've only done the mainframe and one
plugin, but you can see the results here:

http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/%D0%A11-122
http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/%D0%AF4%D0%A1-89

I'll keep adding more as I get time to work on it.

Chris

--
Dave
Manuals@...
www.ArtekManuals.com

 

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 10:38 am, cmjones01 wrote:


even here in Poland
Poland ?

Jak cie macj!

No I don't speak it, just know a few words. Like coorva, if I am spelling it right. And pivo. And of course zlaty to pay for those goodies.

I heard parts were hell to get there. That repair shops were like junkyards and did alot of cannibalizing. And I don't know if it applies, I was told the Russian CRTs were junk, always bad. However, that was in TVs and might not apply to scopes.

Bob Albert
 

I don't think cannibalizing is happening only in Poland.  It's my main source of repair parts here in California.  I have torn apart many a monitor, amplifier, computer, and more, salting away the parts in my stock.  If I need a part, it's almost always there.
The down side is all the space it takes.  I have many drawers full of screws and other hardware.  Lots of transistors and ICs, capacitors and resistors (especially the less common fusible ones), diodes, switches, heat sinks, cables, transformers, LEDs, relays, connectors, ferrites, spacers, and the list goes on.  The last several repairs I have made didn't require buying parts, since they are all right here.  If I can find them.
Bob

On Thursday, May 3, 2018, 10:04:26 AM PDT, Jeff Urban <@JURB> wrote:

On Wed, May  2, 2018 at 10:38 am, cmjones01 wrote:


even here in Poland
Poland ?

Jak cie macj!

No I don't speak it, just know a few words. Like coorva, if I am spelling it right. And pivo. And of course zlaty to pay for those goodies.

I heard parts were hell to get there. That repair shops were like junkyards and did alot of cannibalizing. And I don't know if it applies, I was told the Russian CRTs were junk, always bad. However, that was in TVs and might not apply to scopes.

stefan_trethan
 

I think that is understood in all of eastern Europe no matter how you
spell it. ;-)
Reminds me of the time a Czech colleague was teaching us some choice
words, that one foremost, and two guys from Ukraine happened to be
within earshot. Given their shocked reaction I think they understood
just fine.

Anyway, I often find rare or obsolete parts in Poland. It's a little
bit like China, only quicker shipping, and they don't care if
something is in a little bit of a grey area.

During the cold war under COCOM it must have been very different, my
colleagues often tell about having to put resistors in series/parallel
because you couldn't get the right values. Back then only the military
could get the good stuff, but now "everything is in Poland", as they
like to say.

ST

On Thu, May 3, 2018 at 7:03 PM, Jeff Urban <@JURB> wrote:

No I don't speak it, just know a few words. Like coorva, if I am spelling it right.

Dave Seiter
 

Why does it say "Made in USSR" in english?  Seems odd that they'd need that.
-Dave

From: cmjones01 <chris@...>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 3, 2018 8:03 AM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] New acquisition: Soviet 7000-series copies

On Wed, May  2, 2018 at 10:07 am, stefan_trethan wrote:
Looking forward to the non-potato pictures.
I've started adding some pictures and description to TekWiki. They're a bit rough and ready at the moment and I've only done the mainframe and one plugin, but you can see the results here:

http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/%D0%A11-122
http://w140.com/tekwiki/wiki/%D0%AF4%D0%A1-89

I'll keep adding more as I get time to work on it.

Chris

 

On Thu, May 3, 2018 at 08:20 pm, Dave Seiter wrote:


Why does it say "Made in USSR" in english?
You get the observant award of the day. I didn't even think of that and if I had I might have dismiss it as English being a "universal" language, which is actually a farce. English speaking is not in the majority even though it is spoken by people of many tongues as a second language. My UScentroism leanings is the reason, and I freely admit that.

But that of course does not answer your quite astute question. Why indeed ? Unless they intended it to be found by US ians knowing we are the most unilingual people on Earth. (if even that lol)

Thanks for refreshing my brain here.

Dave Seiter
 

I was trying to figure it out, and the only thing that seemed to make any sense was advertising- They wanted to ensure that any English-speaking person who happened to see such a fine scope would know that the great soviet was responsible for it (and it was all their own design, of course!)
-Dave 

From: Jeff Urban <@JURB>
To: TekScopes@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, May 3, 2018 10:49 PM
Subject: Re: [TekScopes] New acquisition: Soviet 7000-series copies

On Thu, May  3, 2018 at 08:20 pm, Dave Seiter wrote:


Why does it say "Made in USSR" in english?
You get the observant award of the day. I didn't even think of that and if I had I might have dismiss it as English being a "universal" language, which is actually a farce. English speaking is not in the majority even though it is spoken by people of many tongues as a second language. My UScentroism leanings is the reason, and I freely admit that.

But that of course does not answer your quite astute question. Why indeed ? Unless they intended it to be found by US ians knowing we are the most unilingual people on Earth. (if even that lol)

Thanks for refreshing my brain here.

Michael A. Terrell
 

According to Lt. Sulu on Star Trek, the Russians invented everything!

Michael A. Terrell

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave Seiter <d.seiter@...>

I was trying to figure it out, and the only thing that seemed to make any sense was advertising- They wanted to ensure that any English-speaking person who happened to see such a fine scope would know that the great soviet was responsible for it (and it was all their own design, of course!)
-Dave

Nikolai Nashutinskii
 

This is an export version as we can tell by German words used. And the «made in" mark appeared on almost everything intended to go abroad.

The same scopes for local market don’t have this marking on the front panel (may be somewhere in the back and most certainly in Russian) - check the one selling now on Russian site:
https://www.qrz.ru/classifieds/detail/oscillograf-s1-122_283950


Nikolay

4 мая 2018 г., в 6:19, Dave Seiter <d.seiter@...> написал(а):

Why does it say "Made in USSR" in english? Seems odd that they'd need that.
-Dave

Ed Breya
 

I googled it up and found:

"It was supposed to say "Hecho en USSR," but the Chinese supplier of the labels misread the French font company's tag dimensions from the English screen printing service's East Germany office's spec sheets. This simple English-metric conversion error caused their IBM 360 to have a floating-point error, and it jumped to the wrong pattern list altogether, so the wrong export label was generated. The printer/typographer noticed it and reported the problem, but nobody knew what to do about it - they shipped anyway, and forwarded the report. When the plates arrived in Vilnius, the Fubar Technology Correction Office took note of the report, and determined that it would be OK as long as this batch of units remained in the Eastern Bloc."

So there you have it - no big deal.

Ed