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10 EASY WAYS TO TROUBLESHOOT WITH AN OSCILLOSCOPE


Carl Moon <carl.moon@...>
 

These 10 simple exercises — beginning with the simplest and moving to the more difficult — will help sharpen your skills in the field.

https://baninii.com/2020/09/07/10-easy-ways-to-troubleshoot-with-an-oscilloscope/


Randy.AB9GO
 

Well this article assumes you know something about connecting a scope to a
live AC circuit. A differential probe is a great starting point. Also
using a battery powered scope and a making certain no path to ground
exists.

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Bob Headrick
 

Yes, the guide seems to be lacking common sense. The comment measuring the line voltage (and frequency) brought a smile. I remember back 40 years or so ago an instructor at a well known university was attempting to show class the waveforms on a triac circuit. I walked out after he connected the scope ground to the hot line and tripped a breaker. Unfortunately, I missed the greater fun, when (I heard later) he managed to get himself connected to the hot side of the line while holding a grounded microphone. The mic went flying....

The suggestion that a scope can be used as an autoranging DMM does not apply for most of the scopes folks have in this group. None of the half dozen scopes I have are autoranging, connecting any of them to line voltage without careful understanding of settings and probe limits would likely result in damage.


amirb
 

please research the author first before debating the article !


saipan59 (Pete)
 

Looking at the author's site, it *appears* that he has good intentions, and enjoys learning about a wide variety of things, but lacks actual expertise/experience (at least in electronics).
He may not realize that a scope is NOT essentially an auto-ranging DMM, and that advising newbies to make AC line measurements is a Bad Idea.

Pete


EJP
 

please research the author first before debating the article !
Why? This is unscientific. Debatable advice is debatable no matter who utters it.

EJP


Thomas Garson
 

Pete,

Some (many young?) people think "scopemeters" are the Real McCoy, having never used a traditional oscilloscope and may think no one else alive has either.

OTOH, The digital heads only think in 1s and 0s and somehow conceive that oscilloscopes are no longer needed because analog is dead and every signal running around inside a digital device is a clean high or low state (1 or 0). (I do agree with them that antenna theory is at least partly witchcraft)

Many years ago (1980s?)I introduced the head of the electronics department at the best of the bunch area community college to a semiconductor curve tracer. He didn't know they existed. To his credit I could see a bright light flashing right through his eyes when I explained what he was looking at, and he was a relatively recent EE! Quite some time later, he informed me that he had requisitioned one for his department, got it in their lab, played with it for a few days, and procured several more. Curve tracing various types of semiconductors, and documenting the meaning of what is displayed became a required part of the degree path for his students. I suspect his graduate placement rate went up considerably. Sadly, he is only a few years my junior and may be on his way out, perhaps already retired. I can only hope he had a hand in choosing his replacement.

Anyway, my point is that, previously, this same CC had been graduating students with an associate degree in electronics with the barest consideration of discrete component behavior beyond resistors and capacitors. Linear was nearly all opamps and digital was all logic probes on engineered student experiment platforms that had been carefully designed to produce precise, repeatable results. No Surprises! With that sort of mentality driving many of our schools, how can we expect the general public, even the smart ones, to know they don't know?

It took me many years of study, and more than a few years learning, to realize how little I know. I don't even poopoo my friend who is in search of perpetual motion and/or free energy. I just tell him to build it and show me it working and let me play with it in my lab. If it still works after an inquisition, we'll become rich and famous unless, of course, were killed first to suppress it.

Thomas Garson
Aural Technology, Ashland, OR
By my calculation, the dynamic range of the universe is roughly 679dB,
which is approximately 225 bits, collected at a rate 1.714287514x10^23 sps.

On 9/7/20 6:24 PM, saipan59 (Pete) wrote:
Looking at the author's site, it *appears* that he has good intentions, and enjoys learning about a wide variety of things, but lacks actual expertise/experience (at least in electronics).
He may not realize that a scope is NOT essentially an auto-ranging DMM, and that advising newbies to make AC line measurements is a Bad Idea.
Pete


magnustoelle
 

Good day, 
while the author certainly had good intentions, the recommendation to probe live utility power per sections 2 and 3 without proper safety  precautions or links to the known safety standards & best practices is unbelievably risky and unnecessary. Why pose such a risk for beginners? Why the author fails to recommend some low voltage probing as a start is beyond comprehension.
Cheers,
Magnus

Pete,

Some (many young?) people think "scopemeters" are the Real McCoy, having
never used a traditional oscilloscope and may think no one else alive
has either.

OTOH, The digital heads only think in 1s and 0s and somehow conceive
that oscilloscopes are no longer needed because analog is dead and every
signal running around inside a digital device is a clean high or low
state (1 or 0). (I do agree with them that antenna theory is at least
partly witchcraft)

Many years ago (1980s?)I introduced the head of the electronics
department at the best of the bunch area community college to a
semiconductor curve tracer. He didn't know they existed. To his credit I
could see a bright light flashing right through his eyes when I
explained what he was looking at, and he was a relatively recent EE!
Quite some time later, he informed me that he had requisitioned one for
his department, got it in their lab, played with it for a few days, and
procured several more. Curve tracing various types of semiconductors,
and documenting the meaning of what is displayed became a required part
of the degree path for his students. I suspect his graduate placement
rate went up considerably. Sadly, he is only a few years my junior and
may be on his way out, perhaps already retired. I can only hope he had a
hand in choosing his replacement.

Anyway, my point is that, previously, this same CC had been graduating
students with an associate degree in electronics with the barest
consideration of discrete component behavior beyond resistors and
capacitors. Linear was nearly all opamps and digital was all logic
probes on engineered student experiment platforms that had been
carefully designed to produce precise, repeatable results. No Surprises!
With that sort of mentality driving many of our schools, how can we
expect the general public, even the smart ones, to know they don't know?

It took me many years of study, and more than a few years learning, to
realize how little I know. I don't even poopoo my friend who is in
search of perpetual motion and/or free energy. I just tell him to build
it and show me it working and let me play with it in my lab. If it still
works after an inquisition, we'll become rich and famous unless, of
course, were killed first to suppress it.

Thomas Garson
Aural Technology, Ashland, OR
By my calculation, the  dynamic range of the universe is roughly 679dB,
which is approximately 225 bits, collected at a rate 1.714287514x10^23 sps.

On 9/7/20 6:24 PM, saipan59 (Pete) wrote:
Looking at the author's site, it *appears* that he has good intentions, and enjoys learning about a wide variety of things, but lacks actual expertise/experience (at least in electronics).
He may not realize that a scope is NOT essentially an auto-ranging DMM, and that advising newbies to make AC line measurements is a Bad Idea.

Pete


Carl Moon <carl.moon@...>
 

Thank you all for your response. I have actually learnt a lot from your responses than from the article itself. It think this group is full of big brain and am happy am here. I will be consulting with most of you before writing any future article. Thank you all once again.
Carl